KING EDWARD VII SCHOOL

SCHOOL CLOTHING.

May we repeat a former announcement, as this seems to be occasionally necessary as a reminder.

Parents are asked as far as possible to see that boys wear a School Blazer and flannel trousers. Favourable comment on the general effect produced by the large majority wearing these has often been made. We should like to see the practice carried out more systematically at the top of the School, and so avoid some undesirable tendencies to extremes which have shown themselves.

May we also point out that some of the more gaudy types of shirt and pullover are not desirable for wearing to school. The occasional practice indulged in of wearing pullovers with collars attached and zip fasteners is to be deprecated. These articles are more fitting for outdoor wear, and usually look out of place and untidy. The zip fastener type also usually obscures the tie, which is often the only sign of membership of the School, since caps are not compulsory above the Third Form.. It is hoped that parents will co-operate and not send boys to School wearing this type of pullover.

In wet weather senior boys are asked to wear a blue beret if headgear is necessary; the variety of cover which often occurs is perhaps amusing, but not particularly dignified.

It is often desirable and necessary for boys to wear Wellington or gum boots to School in bad weather; it is, however, undesirable for them to wear these all day in School. Almost every boy has to have gym. shoes for P.T., and these should be changed into for wearing in School.

MARKING OF CLOTHING, ETC.

We are perturbed at the large amount of lost property which accumulates in the School and which bears no mark indicating who the owner is. Dealing with this takes much time in sorting out and attempting to trace the owners.

We should like to impress on all parents the strong desirability that every article of clothing a boy wears at School should be marked plainly with his name. Items which are commonly not marked are handicraft aprons, lab. coats, swimming trunks, towels, Geometrical instrument cases.

LOCKERS

We should be obliged if you could impress on your son the necessity for keeping his locker locked at all times, and of reporting at once to Mr. Jackson if the lock is found to be faulty, or if he loses the key. Lockers in most cases have to be shared. As the lockers themselves are situated all over the building, it is most desirable that the boy should see that the locker is locked at all times when it contains any articles belonging to him.

SCHOOL MAGAZINE.

We should like to bring again to the notice of parents that the School Magazine provides a complete record of the various activities and results of the School. It is published in the early part of each term, and we should be most obliged if parents would see that their son purchases one.

MEDICAL AND DENTAL APPOINTMENTS.

We are finding that a great deal of time is lost by boys having to attend for these during school hours. This can be particularly harmful in the case of younger boys.

Parents are asked as far as possible to arrange these either on the games afternoon of the boy or for early morning or late afternoon. Work missed through these must be made up. Music Examinations and Driving Tests are other sources of time loss.

ABSENCES.

An unfortunate habit appears to be forming whereby parents expect their sons to be released from school in order to go on holiday on the last day of a term. This is particularly unfortunate at this close of the school Year, when we like as many boys as possible to be present at Final Assembly. The dates of School Terns are supplied to parents and it is hoped that holiday arrangements will be made to fit them. Holidays which have to be taken during the School Term for business reasons are a different matter.

Another type of unnecessary absence is where a senior boy deliberately takes time off for revision before an exanimation. These are too frequent and it is difficult to believe that the reasons given for absence are really genuine. There is no need for this practice, and we hope it will cease. Where special circumstances arise, a request will meet with full consideration.

N. L. CLAPTON.
Headmaster,
22nd July, 1959.