Editorial

1

Gawain and Christabel

39

School Notes

1

The People of the Trowel

40

Ate Distribution

2

What They Think Of Us

41

The Headmaster Replies.

3

Kesmag Christian Forum Report, 1973

43

Plantatree Seventy Three-

5

Home Reports

44

In Which Seven Boys Set Out to Clean a River

6

A Handy Guide to Palmistry

45

"The Dragon"

7

Music

47

Youth Action

8

Mrs. Egan

48

The Daily Bath

9

Visit to Treeton Colliery

49

The Stradivarius

11

Junior Chess Club

50

An Architectural Appraisal of the Upper School

12

Michael Szpakowski - Private Investigator

51

Cry For Help

13

Natural History Society

52

The Fight

14

Chess Report

52

Report on Darwin Lane-..

15

Riding..

53

How To Do It

17

Film Society - Writers Club - Stable News

54

Hadrian's Wall in the Depths of Winter

19

Kesmag Kwiz

55

A Day in the Life of a Teacher

20

Kestours

57

Mr. Finch

21

Easy Kesword

59

Ode to an Assistant Caretaker..

23

Crossword

60

The Government Inspector ..

24

Prize Kesquiz

61

Poems

25 to 34

Howlers

62

Hunt the School Dinners Van

35

Sports Reports

63 to 78

Fund Raising

36

Answers

79

Did You Know?

37

Kesads

80

EDITORIAL STAFF

E. Kershaw, A. Seale, D. C. Amery, S. D. Baggott, M. Szpakowski, J. Drought, M. Hoytink, J. Szpakowski, F. Ebling, J. Stittle, S. Fenwick, G. Fellows, G. Orton, N. Abbott, J. Hoyland, A. Ryder, C. Young, R. Owen, A. Walker, Mrs. M. Ward, Mr. P. N. Wood, Mr. J. Sallabank.

Design and Layout S. Robinson, Mr. P. O. Jones, Mr. P. Farmery.

Photographs: B. Marshall, R. Ibbotson. G. Fellows, Mr. R. Stittle. Sales: Mr. D. Holdford

EDITORIAL

If schooldays really are the happiest (and we assume that somebody did once actually say that) then it follows that Kesmag should, if it does its job, be a merrier mag. than any periodical you might read amid the tribulations and responsibilities of adulthood. We think it is. Why waste your schooldays worrying about what's going to happen when they're over?

But school is far more than lessons and activities. It is a human thing which should play a full, active and responsible part in society; it is a collection of individuals and the magazine needs to reflect this. This year, for the first time, we have committees in both buildings; the number of people involved in the production of Kesmag is colossal and if anybody in the school has done anything worth­while or interesting during the last year we like to think it's mentioned here. If you want to know about a swimming pool with no water, an ex-Rhodesian policeman, holidays in Broomhill - or simply want to see your name in the U 13 soccer squad - then this is your magazine. In fact it's difficult to keep out of Kesmag these days.

SCHOOL NOTES

We send our best wishes to staff who have taken up new appointments. Mr. Shenstone is now Head of Classics at Ecclesfield School, where he can be found at most times practising his run up for the coming cricket season. Mr. Law moved on to Silverdale, where he is now Head of Music and Mr. Caley to Kelvin Flats where he is now a youth worker. We also bade farewell during the year to Mrs. Civico, Miss Wyatt, Mrs. McKinney, Mrs. Rudland and to Mr. Thompson, economist, itinerant folk-singer and enthusiastic Kesmag researcher. We wish them all well.

We managed only two marriages this year. Miss Glass re-appeared as Mrs. Couldwell and Mr. Stead forsook his bachelor status later in the year.

The future of the staff children's party, however, seems assured. Since the last Kesmag we have welcomed the birth of Katy Victoria Davies, Ian James Powell, Christopher David Watson, lain Stuart McKinney and Julie Clare Frith. 

PRIZE DISTRIBUTION

The Prize Distribution was held in the City Hall on November 23rd. In the absence of Ald. Owen, Mrs. Mingay chaired the proceedings and prizes were presented by Paul Harvey, Professor of Clarinet at the Royal School of Military Music and Trinity College of Music, London and an Old Edwardian.

In his report the Headmaster urged the need to balance the claims of old and new, stressing that "we must neither make a religion of change nor blindly worship tradition". As an illustration of the continued re-assessment which he advocated he pointed to the adoption of a five-year 'O' Level course for all candidates and to other changes within the curriculum. Despite a pass rate of only 70% at 'A' Level - good by national standards but not up to our results of previous years - a record number of 106 pupils had proceeded to Further Education and both 'O' Level and C.S.E. results were well up to standard. Our sporting activities continued to flourish with no fewer than 45 teams representing the school in a variety of activities, all of course fully reported in Kesmag - "a highly entertaining, highly disrespectful and highly recommended production". Traditional activities which continued to flourish included the Concert, Carol Service and the Junior and Senior Plays. An equally welcome innovation was the Dance Evening, which attracted an audience of 350, which barely outnumbered the performers. Other activities ranged from Youth Action volunteers supervising paraplegic football matches to Scouts holiday yet more jumble sales and trips apparently penetrating every corner of Europe. What was stressed yet again by the Headmaster was that, remarkably, all this was achieved by a school labouring under the burden of split sites and inadequate accommodation. That so much could be achieved was a tribute to the energy and enthusiasm of the staff.

We don't often have prizes presented by someone who has shared a recording studio with the Beatles. Prof. Harvey's main recollection of them was that they were frustrated, "on the verge of opting out", an attitude which he suggested was "the most negative next to suicide". Obviously a man who enjoyed his work, he stressed the importance of balancing job satisfaction with financial reward although he admitted that a professional musician needed to be "a ruthless, single-minded fanatic". Even if, as he told us, F sharp harmonic minor was easier to understand than human relationships, he had some valuable thoughts on teaching - "You improve yourself; it's a mutually-beneficial two-way activity" - and on his own activities as a composer - "It's definitely worth it. Everyone has creative possibilities". He obviously knew his way around a Speech Day, taking us back to the days of Dr. Barton and to the politic renaming of 'Come Let Us Walk Together', which emerged as 'Sea Interlude' in honour of the visiting admiral. He ended by stressing the need for healthy ambition. "It is necessary in everyone for a success to be made of the epoch-making period which lies before us."

Prof. Harvey disappointed us by not bringing along his clarinet, but made up for it by successfully interceding for the customary day's holiday. The evening concluded with a varied and thoroughly appropriate Musical Entertainment.


The Headmaster has kindly answered these questions which the magazine committee thought were both interesting and relevant.

(1) Is the school council to meet again, and if so, what would you envisage as its functions? Why do you think that the old school council failed - or did it?

I'll answer these questions in reverse! I think the original School Council was a partial failure and this was basically because a democratic procedure was imposed upon a formal, hierarchical situation - it was used as a means rather than an end. But I think it was one of the elements which contributed to the present atmosphere in the school, in which a Council could well thrive. As for its scope, I could write a Burke-type essay on democracy, but I won't; in brief, it could be an opportunity to inform each other, to respect each other's priorities and to create a mutually concerned society.

(2) In these times what do you see as the importance of school uniform? What would you say to the suggestion that people old enough to leave school should be allowed the clothing of their choice at school?

Two positive and two negative answers here. I was very hard up when at school and some families today are equally pushed financially, so it's clear to me that uniform, with its limited demands (and the opportunity for the School to help privately with second-hand uniform) is a welcome relief from the fashion rat-race. This is a point of view I can make but you can imagine that those to whom it most applies are not likely to identify their problem by admitting it. Their parents do, however. The second positive reason is that it is practical: industrial clothing is quite acceptable in adult life and the uniform is - in part - designed to be safe and sensible in the school situation. The 'layered look' in a laboratory might be a menace!

Of the two apparently negative answers, the first is probably unpersuasive and unattractive to you. Uniform - even one like ours, which allows older pupils considerable flexibility - identifies the wearer and inhibits anti-social behaviour in the locality. (You've only got to think how invading armies, or visiting soccer supporters can behave when free from local restraints to see that!) But the second one you probably will admit: just as the hard work of the term enhances the idleness of the holidays, so the limitations of school uniform give an extra pleasure to the wearing of the clothes of your choice out of school.

(3) Apart from the obvious advantages to career and university entrance of purely academic qualifications, how important do you feel these qualifications to be, and do you feel that the amount of time devoted to passing exams is justified?

There is a need for an external, impartial assessment of students' achievements and potential - partly to help them decide what to do and partly as a yardstick for University and College admissions' tutors or for future employers. But the key lies in the phrase "purely academic". If you were fed on nothing but examination fodder, you would have cause to complain but within any syllabus there is enormous scope to introduce topics and arguments that go far beyond it - if the teaching is good and if the student responds. As far as the teaching goes, a continuing revision of what and how to teach goes on and the decision to do away with the 4-year 0-level course was based on the realisation that it cut out much that was stimulating and enlarging. But the students also must respond, not merely by working at what is strictly relevant to the examination course but by making time to follow up interests both by themselves and through the non-classroom activities offered at school.

(4) As the headmaster of a very busy and large school it is inevitable that there is some degree of separation between you and the majority of the pupils and that, to many, you become a distant figure. Do you feel that this is so, and if so, do you believe it to be a bad or good thing?

I don't honestly think that the Head's function is to be cosily familiar, though I like to help individual boys and girls in personal situations whenever I'm the right person to do so. But in our set up there are a lot of people en route to me - form supervisors, year tutors, sectional heads and so on, many of whom can do what the Head of a small school used to do. They're appointed to do this because I value their abilities and don't think I'm the only person capable of helping and advising.

Where I'm of most help is in battling with the Local Education Authority for better provision for the school, in deciding the school's priorities and by trying to provide for a community at once unified and flexible. So I try to see things as a whole and yet also to see things in terms of individuals, as a constant flow of staff, parents, boys and girls to my study continually - and helpfully - reminds me.

 

John Drought

IN WHICH SEVEN BOYS SET OUT TO CLEAN A RIVER

A blustery wind of freshly imported Greenland air swirled the fog on the dark Sunday morning in late November, at five minutes past nine as I descended the road from Walkley and saw seven lads leaning over the parapet of Malin Bridge watching the water rush past underneath. These were the rest .of our group who had, unlike me, turned up on time to spend the day working in the river cleaning up the ugly rubbish that so many thoughtless people had tipped. From the bridge, the work we had to do looked endless: in the river, tyres of all sizes outnumbered the stones, sheet and corrugated metal littered the river-bed, and smaller items ranging from wellington boots to bottles were everywhere.

The drizzle turned to snow, but despite the cold we set to work eagerly, and waded boldly into the water: inevitably, it only took Andrew McCaig about half a minute to get his feet soaked, when he stood in the deep mid-channel of the river. And by the time we had been there ten minutes, everybody had given up all thought of staying dry, and had rolled their trouser legs up above their knees.

We worked steadily through the day, and by tea-time had filled the skip that the corporation had lent us, with a huge pile of rubbish: but during the day there were several mishaps. The first came when we were all straining on a rope tied around a large water-filled tyre. Suddenly the tyre moved and Simon Wessely staggered back and fell into the mud on the river bank, letting out a few well chosen words as he did so.

We made quite an impact on the local residents; for they saw us at work, and many of them told us what a good job we were doing, while we tried to educate them not to toss their rubbish large or small, into the River Loxley. However, not all of what we did made a good impact, for when they saw us marching across Malin Bridge carrying bricks and iron rods, wearing wellingtons and rolled up dripping wet jeans, certain of the passers-by almost collapsed with hysterics. And it was our turn to collapse with hysterics when Andrew McCaig sprinted to catch a bus without removing or even emptying his wellingtons, and sprayed sheets of water over the people in the queue at the bus stop. From some of their comments, we gathered that they were not altogether pleased at having been showered.

When dusk drew in, at about half-past four, snow began to fall again. As I trudged up the hill to the Walkley bus-stop, I began to ponder over what someone had said as he strained at a tyre in the water earlier that day, "Why can't they ask us to do this sort of thing in summer?"

Stephen Love.

 

 
Photo: D Fellows

"THE DRAGON" - by Eugene Schwarz

A two-hour Junior Play by a totally unfamiliar Russian seemed unlikely to be a high­light of the pre-Christmas festivities. Just think how many Infants' Schools would be presenting "Dragons" that week. And if the ancient Upper School has for so long practised variations on a semi-thrust stage, what trendy throw-back to Elizabethan days might be imposed on us by the newer building at Crosspool?

Of course, you're quite right: it was all a pleasant surprise. Back to the proscenium arch of all things, to provide that valuable framework for training in elocution, stage movement, and hoaxing of the public which one remembers from one's own staider schooldays. Even more paradoxical, here were boys and girls being themselves in the context of what was claimed to be a profound political fable!

While a privileged seat avoided the hearing problems experienced at the back, it allowed appreciation of the space available on the Lower School stage. However, it is ill-served by lights, a deficiency not entirely overcome by weeks of hard work by the Physics department. With traditional footlights the area forward of the "arch" could be more fully exploited for involving the audience.

The smoothness of the production also testified to the greater elbow-room backstage, for there was none of the subdued murmurings and fluttering side-drops often evident at Glossop Road. Unfortunately, though, the story-line allowed no natural breakpoint for the single interval. The evening was therefore unbalanced by the heavier meat being served for the deliberations of the Third Act, when a tidy denouement, as action packed as the Second Act, would have appealed much more.

Of the principals, the megalomaniac Burgomaster carried a very heavy load, but Philip Hayes played Philip Hayes almost to perfection and added the necessary extra dimension by the time he was power-drunk. He clearly enjoyed every uninhibited minute, even with a throat like sandpaper. His minion, Graham Fellows, produced the evening's most natural performance, whether in gentler scenes with Elsa or as the rather cynical straight man to the Burgomaster. Indeed, his timing at the extravagant buffet-table in the last Act was almost uncanny. Julia Lee's Elsa was very relaxed and level-headed, if not wholeheartedly involved in her contrasting relationships. As Sir Lancelot, the protagonist of "freedom", Stephen Donkersley was coping with more of a cardboard figure and so hardly shared the conviction of the others. Special mention is also due to Jayne Thorpe in the difficult spectator role of the more obviously fantastic Mistress Cat, and to the Dragon, unique in possessing three personae whose voices conveyed its totalitarian character by height of pitch. An earthquake could hardly have deflected the third, Francis Ebling, from his evil course.

Yet teamwork was the hallmark of a production that involved over thirty players, all appropriately costumed, and an even longer list of backstage helpers. The hours of hard work were also vouched for by the easy staging of several well populated scenes, including the downfall of the Dragon's heads from three different points in the flies! So successful a contribution to Lower School activities reflected much credit on the tolerance of all those working there and on the insight and stamina of Mesdames Ward and Ritchie, the producers.

YOUTH ACTION

At the beginning of the school year, the organisation of Youth Action had to be readjusted to deal with a much larger body of volunteers. For the first time, the Fifth Form was given the option of joining Youth Action on Wednesday afternoons, and this change, coupled with the astonishing enthusiasm of the new Sixth Form, boosted the numbers to well over ninety. With so many new jobs to find, it was unfortunate that the Assistant Youth Officer had gone abroad, which meant that we were obliged to make more contacts ourselves among the local clergy and social workers. It was only by the end of the first term that we managed to find jobs for everyone.

As a result of the increase in numbers, the scope of Youth Action activities has naturally widened. One group of volunteers now visits Middlewood each week to make friends with some of the residents. And, after an appeal from Hallamshire Hospital for volunteers prepared to give up free periods to guide patients through the Outpatients Department, we received so much support that we now work a rota of two escorts together, for most of the time from nine to four every day of the week.

The weekly visits to playgroups, and to old, sick and handicapped people, continue and this work too is expanding. Three boys, who have been gardening for an elderly diabetic for eighteen months, have turned this year to decorating his house.

But the more we enquire about work to be done, the more we find; and there are certain problems that even a booming economy and adequate financial support would not solve by themselves.

Thanks are due to Mrs. Couldwell for organising these activities.

 

 

THE STRADIVARIUS

I first started making violins at an early age. I had watched my grandfather make them with an inborn skill. Every piece, every cut was made with loving care and his enthusiasm instilled this love into me. I was old now but my skill and love had increased and I had started on a project to make a perfect copy of a Stradivarius. I travelled to museums, examined every violin I could find, read every document and then began.

I must have examined every piece of wood a hundred times and I shaped it and fashioned it as if it were for the goddess of music herself. Every varnish was made to the instructions of Stradivarius and even­tually the violin was completed after three years of work. It was my masterpiece, the pinnacle of my achievements.

I took it to a well-known antique dealer, more out of curiosity than anything else. I was fascinated to see how well it would stand up to his minute scrutiny. To my amazement he really believed it was genuine and offered to put it up for auction the next week so I agreed, fascinated at this curious turn of events. I waited in trepidation for the auction. I must have been interviewed twenty times and this new "discovery" was headlines in all the national papers.

When the day came I took my place in the large bustling marble hall. After several fine instruments came my violin, the star of the show, and the bidding began. The price crept up slowly at first, then faster and faster. The bidders dwindled and at last the fight was between two men. One was young, arrogant and rich. The other was an elderly gentleman with grey hair and twinkling eyes. He looked with longing at the violin. I felt pity for him and then guilt crept over me. This gentleman was perhaps about to hand over all his money for a forgery, a sham.

As the young man pushed him higher I felt sick with myself. Eventually the arrogant fellow gave up in disgust and the old man hurried forward. My conscience battled within me, forcing me to admit the truth and shame-faced I hurried to the auctioneer. In a low voice I explained the whole story to him. To my amazement he laughed and refused to believe me. Indeed he made no secret of the fact that he thought I must be crazy to suggest such a thing. Eventually he hurried out with the violin and did not return for some time. When he did, the whole room fell silent, straining to hear the reason for the interruption. He was beaming all over his face as he announced that the violin definitely was genuine and he handed it over to the-old man. I tried to protest but the auctioneer merely raised his eyebrows and hurried away.

I walked home, consoling myself with the thought that everyone was happy in the end. The old man had his "Stradivarius" and I had the satisfaction of knowing that I had made such a beautiful instrument that had fooled the best valuers in the country.

Heather Branson 4F

AN ARCHITECTURAL APPRAISAL OF THE UPPER SCHOOL

Seen from the south, the building that houses King Edward VII Upper School appears a great grey-yellow block, greyed to an indeterminate shade by the cleanest industrial air in Europe!

It stands cold and erect in squarish blocks on the side of a hill, originally alone and probably much more impressive. At a distance it must have seemed a great ugly palace. But that was before it was squeezed into a few miserable acres by the rapidly expanding bourgeois suburbia.

The school was designed to reflect the ethos of its Wesleyan builders as a study of the dead Greek and Latin civilisations, whose culture was considered the only fit basis for the education of gentlemen.

From the front the building presents a view grand as it is grim, solid as it is sober. Two wings extend from a Partheonic central block which is approached by a ceremonial staircase flanked by two white Grecian urns and further down by two Victorian gaslamps. The staircase stretches upward in a large triangle to a level where eight enormous Corinthian columns shield a door of lilliputian proportions. The pity is that the door is largely unused, the real entrances being tucked away at either side.

The unused doorway is in a way representative of the whole building - a grand facade; a wartime wedding-cake where the synthetic icing has to be removed before one can see the reality beneath. Yet even the idea of a grand facade is spoilt by a closer inspection of the building. The eight central columns, and the corresponding columns on the wings, prove to be nothing but an outdoor relief spot for pigeons, and their topmost parts stream with white.

A wealth of moss grows in the neglected gutters and the ground is thickly littered with torn paper and crisp packets.

If the front view is depressing and offensive to the eye, then the back is markedly worse. In futile attempts to add to the frontal grandeur, the Victorian designer has directed all the plumbing to run down behind the building, with the result that the whole area is covered with drainpipes, drains and grates. And all the school's outbuildings are clustered around the back, like chicks around a mother hen. The toilets, the kitchens and the new wing have the effect of creating totally unnecessary pockets containing assorted motorbikes, dustbins and mysterious huts with no visible purpose attached to them.

Without losing any of its superficial grandeur, the Upper School is lined with tall, draughty corridors not unlike those of a museum, although the corresponding rooms, unlike the halls of a museum, are pokey and small, with ancient desks arranged haphazardly.

Seventy years ago the chapel was altered to provide Science labs, and twenty years ago the new wing was added for Art, Science and Craft workshops. The school refused to shake off its Wesleyan garb of classical education while insisting on the new look. This resulted, inside the building, in classical honours notices being freely strewn in their oak covers on every available wall, side by side with brightly coloured scientific posters. Outside the building, it resulted in the architectural chaos that exists at present.

Ken Baker.

 

 
Glyn Satterthwaite 2Y

 

 

By J Stittle and F Ebling

 

 

HADRIAN'S WALL IN THE DEPTHS OF WINTER

No, your eyes are not deceiving you. Eleven mad members of the Upper School and Mr. Ayres set off one wet Friday afternoon at the beginning of December. The weather in Sheffield was to remain terrible but at Hadrian's Wall the short days were gloriously sunlit.

Self-catering at Youth Hostels was the chosen mode of accommodation and highly successful it proved to be, thanks to everybody's willingness to lend a hand. Terrace-houses turned out to be the cunningly disguised Y.H. in Barnard Castle. The warden was an easy-going character and made our party, the only people there bar one, most welcome. We managed to sample three delights of the North-East; real coal fires and Newcastle Brown together with lubricated Geordie accents. Saturday night's stop in the apparently sleepy village of Acomb was almost more lively but the Y.H.A. converted farmhouse stables proved more alluring than the local maidens.

On Saturday Blanchland, Chesters and Housesteads Roman Forts and the Winshield Crags area of the wall were visited. Chester's Bath House is one of the most impressive Roman remains in Britain, though for sheer size and location Housesteads is as darkly menacing as it was 1,850 years ago. There were no crowds, of course, at this time of year and we had time to speculate on which story about the grooves in the Housesteads water-tank is true. (Surely not sword sharpening?) Later, we followed the westering sun to Winshield Crags. Despite protesting stomachs, we took advantage of the only Public Convenience in England to have won a Civic Trust Award and climbed to the trig. point at one of the highest parts of the wall. This is one of the best preserved sections of the wall, and the most isolated. At about 4 p.m. a stop for food was finally made in Hexham, a very historic market town.

The necessity to return the minibus within forty-eight hours meant that we could only make a brief stop to see the fossil tree at Stanhope on Sunday. Thanks to Mr. Ayres' incredible driving ability, the vehicle was returned to Thrybergh in one piece.

E. Mark Bell.

 

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A TEACHER

Every morning the teacher gets up and puts on the kettle. While it is boiling he cuts his hair to counter-act nocturnal growth. After he has put away the egg-cup, the kettle is boiling and he fills his small stainless-steel tea-pot specially designed to hold one cup of tea for one person, one day and one mind. HE sits at his place and munches away at his piece of toast and reads a paper, no bother, no fuss, no noise, nobody.

He travels to school in his car accompanied only by a pile of lifeless books. When he gets to the staff room he puts on his outer crust, his crust from which he talks and teaches.

The day goes past with a nasty cut on a boy's knee and then, just for a few seconds, he opens his crust and lets a little of "himself" out.

When he gets home at night he watches the T.V., gets his dinner of beefburger and asparagus and then settles down to mark some books. He looks at the pile and groans but he knows that he needs those books. Outside they are hard plain exercise books but inside they are people, real red, pulsing people with sympathy and generosity and wit as though he is at a party by himself. Finally he locks away his friends in his case and goes to bed, a single bed.

C. Morris 3Q

 

Mr. Finch

Mr. Finch is married and the father of two boys aged eight and ten. He teaches the two year leavers' course and he is the official, qualified driving instructor and car repairs tutor.

During his career he has been an apprentice draughtsman and a bank clerk. He did two years national service in the R.A.F., became an undertaker - just to drive a Rolls - and then a teacher at Birmingham College of Education. Since then he has taught at Wath, Hinde House and for five years (1959-1964) in Rhodesia because of poor pay in the U.K. Political agitation forced him back to England. He taught at Wybourn, Prince Edward's and Greystones before coming to King Edward's.

One recollection of undertaking days is the 'stiff leg' story. "We used to have to go down to the spiker (slang for workhouse), then Fir Vale and the Northern General; the undertakers took it in turn to give those who had no relatives or friends a decent burial service. We arrived there one day with our foreman, a short ex-RSM, very smart and precise, a staunch chapelman and a very good ventriloquist. Realising our candidate was on the top shelf of the fridge at about six feet above the ground, he said. "Now then thee, get yourself down', to which he ventriloquised, 'I can't, I've got a stiff leg'. 'Tha what?' - 'Yeah it's cold up here.'

Another story that he tells took place on one of his expeditions in Bechuanaland around parts of the Kalahari. "We were in the bush, looking for food, and we came across a flock of guinea foul. Their technique is to ignore you until either you poke a rifle out of the Landrover or you put your foot on the ground, As soon as you do they're away and they run for about twenty yards. Then they stop to see if they're being pursued. So you run for nineteen yards, wait for them to stop and then let fly. On this occasion we had a .22 and a lucky shot caught one which flapped about; so I ran to this thing and clouted it with the barrel, because they have these spikes on the backs of their legs which can make quite a nasty wound. Then, forty yards from the vehicle, I picked up the bird, wrung its neck, trotted back to the Landrover and slung it in the back. We moved off. We'd gone twenty yards and someone said "Hold it!" There, twenty yards from where I had been, were two lions lying under a thorn bush, with an expression as if to say 'Look at that silly . . ., fancy running about in the heat at this time of day!" And they hadn't done a thing. Of course I went three shades whiter and quite cold. I think if they had eaten me they'd have got food poisoning."

On the workshop and driving:
"When I arrived I was pleased to see the workshop was here, having mentioned to Mr. Sharrock that it was something I was interested in. We got hold of this old Morris Cowley from Luxicabs; Fieldhouse was then in school and his father kindly gave us this car, which we spent one Christmas making roadworthy, and which has been running now for three years. We anticipated its life to be one.

They are allowed to bring in their own vehicles whether motorbike or car, and this gives us live practical work to do, and teaches responsibility, because a mistake on a car can mean an accident. So far we have had no come-back whatsoever: all our jobs have been 100%."

This is a secondhand account which typifies Mr. Finch's style of discipline. On one occasion he followed a sixthformer who had spat on the ground and said 'Excuse me, you've dropped something.' The boy fumbled in his pockets, looking around, Mr. Finch explained, 'There on the ground - pick it up'. Needless to say he did.

"We've got another school bus. With regard to my own class, doing the new two years leavers' course, this will enable us to get out into the field and study, instead of sitting in a classroom which is very dull indeed. It's time we started to teach them something and to make their lives in school interesting and worthwhile, so that when they leave we can say, for example, 'This person can work without direct supervision and has shown some degree of responsibility'

"I think, in addition to a bus, this school should have some kind of outdoor centre, whether it be an old farmhouse, which we can renovate, an old railway station, or a canal barge. I think there is insufficient time devoted to practical fieldwork on an everyday basis. The norm seems to be to get into a classroom or laboratory and get some theoretical work done and never to apply this theory and put it into practice. This is very difficult at 'A' level I know, because you have a syllabus to cover for entrance requirements. Abroad in Rhodesia we used to take out mechanised expeditions, accompanied by willing scientists, world-famous ornithologists and biologists, in order to study and to put into practice the work they had done in the labs. It was marvellous to work with a world-famous ornithologist instead of having to read his book, to see how he goes about hanging his nets for example. And the same for river biologists. As a result of river ecology they decided the crocodile should be protected.

"I think family life is no longer what it used to be. I think television has had a lot to do with it, although television can be good, it seems to me that you go to someone's house, knock on the door -they say "Come in, sit down, shut up, we're watching telly', and so no conversation ensues. The family gathering at Christmas is not the same; times change obviously. There used to be a gathering in a big room with a piano, and everyone would get stuck in singing carols and so on, but now it's all television centred depersonalised.

"As far as ambition goes, I suppose it's wrong maybe to say I'm quite satisfied as I am.

I find immense job satisfaction. I think if I was ever in the position where a headship was in my reach I should reject it. I would be out of direct touch with kids. And this is what I enjoy most really, talking and working with kids."

JOHN DROUGHT.

 

 

THE GOVERNMENT INSPECTOR

This year's senior school play, produced by Mr. Winder ably assisted by Mr. Ferretti, was a less well known one, written in the first half of the last century by the Russian, Nikolai Gogol, and entitled "The Government Inspector". So as to be more acceptable to a Sheffield audience the setting was changed to a Yorkshire village and this succeeded admirably. The names of the characters had, of course, to be changed as well, and Mr. Winder christened them very appropriately ("Fiddler" for the dishonest judge, "Lerner" for the school superintendent and "Crawley" for the postmaster, the eternal yes-man). There was nothing out of place to suggest that the play was originally intended in any other setting.

It was a comedy, both in its overall conception, the whole comic situation being based on the mistaking of an insignificant and penniless government clerk for a government inspector, and in its details, not least of which were the manifold antics of those two landowners Peters Hobson and Robson, alike in name, nature and costume. Here indeed was the two man knockabout comedy team, Matthew Bannister and Ken Baker, who seemed to have an excellent understanding and timed their replies and gestures almost to perfection, provoking probably more laughter than anyone else.

Almost all the characters were comic, though the remainder in a less pleasant way, than the landowners. All the officials in the town were intent on deceit, as was the government clerk when he realised the possibilities of the quid pro quo, and the mayor's wife was an insufferable person with social pretensions and full of her own importance, though really only a big fish in a very small pool. This role was admirably interpreted by Aileen Anderson who managed to produce very affected mannerisms and speech whilst markedly slipping back into a few Yorkshire vowels and the odd grammatical blunder. Like the other characters but to an even greater extent she was a caricature, her bad points being absurdly exaggerated.

Chris Litherland as the mayor came to terms with his part and cleverly showed the contrast between his overbearing attitude to those under him in HIS town and his attitude of submission to the "inspector" whom he was obliged to placate. Kevin Charlesworth as the other major character, Lestoc-Granville, the "inspector" got great comic effect also from two contrasting attitudes - the first where he was on the defensive, expecting to be imprisoned for debts, the second where he was on top - milking the town's officials dry. But most comic of all between the two was the transition stage where he was becoming aware of the mistake about his identity but still feeling his way and reacting violently at the merest mention of prison or judges. This was a long and difficult part and though Kevin appeared a little forced at times he is to be commended for his performance.

Among the other parts one must mention the incongruity between Luke Lerner's extreme nervousness (manifested by Cliff Watson's tireless and ceaseless twitching) and his job as superintendent - especially in education; also Sam (Chris. Mower)'s authentic cockney accent, and the contrast of innocence and naiveté which Maria (Jeannette Fletcher) alone among the main characters provided. Finally, all the actors are to be congratulated on their very clear and eminently intelligible speech.

The set this year was very simple but to a large extent the magnificence of the costumes (and especially worthy of note were the ladies' dresses) fulfilled the function which would otherwise have been fulfilled by a more complicated set.

This play was undoubtedly a success, mainly because it was a good, and well produced comedy; the characters were exaggeratedly and absurdly funny, but nevertheless basically real. What may have given it a rather more serious note, though fleetingly so, was the appearance of various members of the proletariat, complaining about the way they were both financially and physically misused by those in authority. It suggests that Gogol's knives are perhaps sharper than the major part of the play would lead us to believe; and if it is as much an attack on those in authority either at local or national level as an attempt to entertain, it is surely as valid an attack today as in Russia in the 1830's, especially on some of our local government officials who are only there for the beer, and the title!

 

Chris Priestman; Simon Baggot

 

Peter Sells, 6M

 

Julie Civil 3Y; D Holmes 2W; Chris Priestman; Rhiannon Owen 3P

 

Amanda Walker 3P; Martin Smith 6M; Lucy Mann 1(1)

 

Carol James 2P; Susan Thornton 3A; Simon Baggott

 

 

Anne Seale

 

Amanda Walker 3P; Amanda Ryder 3W; Michael Szpakowski

 

Catherine Binney 3Q

 

Ceri Jones 2P; Martin Archer 6C; Martin Archer 6C

 

Martin Archer 6C; Simon Ward 2P; Rhiannon Owen

 

 

S Robinson

FUND-RAISING

We all know that the School has a new mini-bus and that other purchases are envisaged. How to raise money? Kesmag reports on a few ideas.

One of the Science labs. has turned out a bubbling Asti-Spumanti for the cheese and wine tasting evening which hopes to raise enough to buy the wheels of the mini-bus. After treading the entire crop of rhubarb grown in the unused goal area on the hockey and football pitches, they made 30,000 Tizer-sized bottles and these with a 1/41b. of medium Cheddar cheese should serve adequately the 150 ticket-holders on this special occasion. Please bring a flame-proof tumbler and asbestos gloves may be worn. The Ministry of Defence has expressed an interest in our Crosspool Cocktail.

The School Hall was packed for the first time, for the Swahili Bingo Session at 10p a card. We are optimistically counting the profits as no one called "House" in Swahili all evening and prizes were therefore withheld. In fact, none of the participants seemed to have any of the numbers called.

The "Instant Yoga Course" is recommended after the Cheese and Wine evening. Both are proving to be money-spinners and creating a deep impression!

Our oldest member of Lower School has formed a "Compulsive Choir" and these are really pulling their weight in the fund-raising. Their fee for a couple of dirges is a mere 41/2p or 10'/2p not to sing at all or 15p not even to turn up!

We are sorry to report that the third year's idea for a sponsored night 'cycle ride did not meet with success as again events proved too much for them. In a mix-up, a party of senior citizens due for a quiet evening of bridge organised by Class 3P, were hustled on to awaiting "Chopper" bikes and ordered to pedal to Mam Tor in the gathering dusk. We are waiting for news. Come in, No. 7!

Anne Seale

 

 

 

 

 

THE PEOPLE OF THE TROWEL by E. Mark Bell.

"A post-hole!" Your site supervisor is ecstatic as he views your patch of earth. "I must get that planned". Smiles all round, tinged with curiosity. "Not wishing to appear ignorant, but what is a 'post-hole'?"

Blinking, followed by ten minutes' review of the said supervisors Ph.D. thesis on the subject. Elation.

"You might like to shore up the spoil-heap while you are waiting."

Boredom paralysis. Site supervisors are fetishists when it comes to spoil-heaps, and they slave-drive their volunteers from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. with only a lunch-hour and two 15 minute breaks as respite.

What sort of creatures are they? The site supervisor of popular imagination is a pith-helmeted director of native labour or that epitome of eighteenth century amateurism, the barrow-digging squire of Wessex seeing how many graves his estate workers could pillage in an afternoon. I n reality, ever since A. H. Lane-Fox Pitt Rivers emphasised recording and the importance of the commonplace, the archaeologist has been a scientist not a treasure-seeker.

"Who found these bones?" says the site supervisor, gazing into a finds tray which he forgot to check yesterday, relating to square E7 on his 3D drawings.

"I did, yesterday."

"Why did you remove them? You should have trowelled round."

"You told me to take the section right down." (i.e. to levels that trial trenches have shown are interesting).

"Oh, did l?" (Stalemate) "You should have asked me before lifting them."

The bones are replaced in approximately the right position. The recorder makes notes in a card index. The planner puts little marks on maps. The god of science has been appeased. For all you know they could be canine C.1960 or Roman C.196.

Volunteers tend to work in silence, or talk on some deep question designed to alienate the incognoscenti. There are plenty of foreigners, mostly Americans discussing where they have been and where in a few weeks they will be flying on to. The larger the site the better. New people are constantly appearing and old faces departing; few stay for the whole season and they are usually eccentric enough to remain interesting. They live to work, but there are moments of great excitement even fame on a national scale if some important discovery is made. They make a happy workforce always ready to go slow if the heat of the afternoon proves too much, and working like beavers when the holy of holies comes around, the site director.

The sponsor is very often the unseen member of the "genus archaeologensis". The Department of the Environment - going to endless expense to put "ER 11" and a crown on every piece of equipment it supplies - overspent wildly its miserable budget for archaeology last year.

Local councils are not prepared to forward money for things they cannot see. Excavations, especially using modern methods, are exceedingly expensive. The main hope for the future lies with the private sponsor - not the wealthy aristocrats of yesteryear but the small company that suddenly finds its property contains more than is immediately visible. The die-hards shake their heads with visions of a Wills Trophy for the nest digger of 1984, but the reality is in fact helping archaeology. Wishing to see some return on their money the firms tend to advertise their sponsorship and their temporary museums excite public interest. That is the key. Enough people must care sufficiently to contribute practically or financially so that the great work may continue. Next summer's redevelopment or deep-ploughing may have destroyed what is potentially a fine site of major scientific importance. Once lost, archaeological evidence can never be regained.

 

 

E Mark Bell; J Drought; S Baggott

KESMAG CHRISTIAN FORUM REPORT 1973

O.K., so no-one ever reads Christian Forum Reports. I never used to; I could never think of anything more boring. Kesmag is, to say the least, a peculiar magazine, a sort of mixture of Monty Python and Accountants' Weekly, and one of the few things in it that is supposed to add gravity and poise is the Christian Forum Report. Unfortunately this never works because as stated above, no-one ever reads them. The Kesmag Committee said it wanted gravity and poise, something to lend more seriousness to this otherwise rather flighty edition.

"Jesus is Alive Today". You're all seen the stickers and the posters and most of you have said in one way or another, that someone somewhere is quite insane. You're probably right - a lot of very happy people seem to be going around talking about Jesus Christ; if that's not insanity, then what is? But the basic fact is still true - Jesus is very much alive today.

Since the last Kesmag rolled off the presses a great many things have been happening in this school. First, and most important, a great many Christians appear to have come out into the open, and more keep appearing. There is no logical explanation for this madness - it just happens. Secondly, there has been much more Christian activity going on, especially in the form of prayer meetings. The one thing that a prayer meeting must not become is routine - and ours were beginning to look that way, which is why the regular meetings have stopped and only irregular ones take place. We ask God to keep us well away from routine in the future.

Christian Forum meetings have been flourishing, because there have been many more visits and films etc. and much less gab about things nobody can ever hope to understand. It's always best to have God there when you talk about him - because then you start getting somewhere.

Two major events have caused quite a stir in recent months, the visits of the two gospel groups :- Street People Pageant and the Advocates. A large number of people came to both, and nearly all enjoyed themselves. Some had something to think about and maybe they didn't enjoy that so much.

It's not much use listing past events for you, because if you weren't there then you have missed them anyway - let us just say that many things will be happening in the future. We don't know what they are, yet, but God does, so that's all right.

So if you want to come to a meeting sometime, for a good laugh, maybe, or to put your views, or just to listen, or maybe even to think, please come; you don't need any qualifications. And if you don't want to do that, then just stop a Christian in the corridor and do him, or her, over, verbally preferably, but physically if you must. We don't mind - God's Love is for everyone and we want you to share it.

CHANTRY HOUSE, 1972

The merging of Clumber and Haddon Houses has hardly re-kindled enthusiasm in the Upper School, but there has been plenty of purposeful activity at Darwin Lane. In particular, money is being raised by a variety of means to buy a sonic torch for the blind. A representative from the Sheffield Institute for the Blind has already been to speak, silver paper and U.K. postage stamps are being saved, and a jumble sale will have been held by now.

We fell away badly on finals day of the Athletics Sports, though Perks shared the Intermediate Championship, and our outstanding sports performances have been limited to the soccer field. Here we won the Middle School league championship, as we have done again this season, and the seniors tied for the Upper School title when we should have won it. Apart from the wins of our third-year girls on the tennis courts and our eventually fruitless efforts in last year's distance swimming, a veil is best drawn over our other results, especially at cross-country.

J.R.B.

MONTGOMERY

Interest in sporting activities has declined and as a result the house has had little success. Our thanks are due to those who have persevered and done their best throughout the year. It is unfortunate that our swimmers have not been able to show their talents.

At the Lower School the house continues to meet on Wednesday mornings.

SORBY

Our third year teams have proved the most successful this year, winning both the cross-country competition and the football league. At the Upper School we have had little success; with the swimming-pool out of action the swimming and water-polo competitions in which Sorby usually do well, had to be abandoned. The general lack of enthusiasm spoilt our chances in the football leagues. We can only hope that the warmer weather will bring with it a greater interest in House Games.

Simon Priest.

BOLSOVER

Our main success this year has been on the athletics field, where we triumphed over the other houses by winning Sports Day. We hope to repeat this achievement in the coming term. The performance of our senior teams in the other sports has been less dramatic, although they have played consistently well all season.

Lower down the school we had a very successful first term. Our junior football teams played their first twelve games without a defeat; the second-year boys actually won their league, as well as the cross-country championship. In addition the first-year girls won their netball match. Since then the boys have been charitable to the opposition and the girls to good causes. By the way, shouldn't Veronica Pinfield really be attending Bolsover meetings?

C. Watson and D.A.A.

handA HANDY GUIDE TO PALMISTRY by JTM

Before reading this article it is important to stress that you follow the right lines and guard against taking your hand too seriously as it can lead to arm.

TYPES OF HAND:

IN-HAND: This type belongs to the person who always has matters well under control. It is thus always in the present tense of time - not waiting to be started but still awaiting completion - and in line with the latest fashions. You might say that it was a trendy sort of hand, an IN-hand. This type is also quite commonly found in mutant form on the drinker - the inn-hand.

UNDERHAND: You will always fall short of the mark. Whatever success and popularity you gain will inevitably be undermined when your tactics are discovered. You find it difficult to act openly even when deception is against your interest. Your other main fault is the illusion that you seem honest to those around you and that your actions are unseen.

OUT-OF-HAND: You lack discretion, common-sense and self-control; in fact you have no abilities at all, apart from consistency. Things are continually going wrong for you; you can never cope; you seem accident-prone. You usually manage to mess up any job given to you and exasperate others by your feeble lack of effort. Your ideal partner is (a) of the in-hand type and (b) so kind that he's stupid.

OFFHAND: The owner of this hand is vague, irrational and irresponsible, but his faults are BASICALLY HUMAN. He seems to have no deep interests in work or leisure. Pontius Pilate is the patron of the Offhands, typifying another facet of their general character - that of buck-passing.

PREDICTIONS FROM HANDS:

- Hand in advanced first shape predicts imminent trouble and pain. You may even see your stars. I advise use of legs in opposite direction.

- Large hairy hand predicts a happy marriage with another hairy hand and lots of lovable baby gorillas.

- A wide span suggests a large hand: the owner is likely to be of a generous nature as he can give away more at a time. - Hand in clenched fist belongs to a very mean person. - Sweaty oily palm due to over-greasing. (Commonplace among fortune-tellers and palm-readers).

- The total lack of a left hand makes manifest that anything originally worth reading probably predicted accident or trauma - e.g. amputation of left hand.

- You are wise if your fingers are short fat and hairy.

FINGERS:

- "Crusty pastry-like appearance" is due to presence in too many pies.

- Fish fingers are found on fish hands but may be bought as a rare delicacy in frozen boxed form.

- Fingers with worn-out prints indicate a professional . . . steel string guitar player or cat-burglar.

- Hand with three fingers belongs to a famous Disney star, guillotine expert or butcher.

- Seeming paralysis of index and fore-finger in an extended position will imply that the owner (person at other end of arm) is a Yorkshire man, a show-jumper, a moron or a combination thereof. Threats of official action effect a rapid cure.

- Hand with elongate, weather-beaten thumb indicates desire to travel without means to do so.

- Hand with beckoning index finger shows ability to make others do your travelling for you.

NAILS:

- Bitten nails indicate gluttony, anxiety or cannibalism.

- Coloured nails may be due to the wide range of cosmetics available but blue nail proves lack of marksmanship with a hammer.

PALMS:

- Frequently used for action known as "palming off", ranging from a comparatively mild rebuff made by a young lady to untoward advances, to the vicious physical method of avoiding tackles in rugby football. In any form it is a most cruel and thoughtless tactic. - Tiny triangles on palms are rare and lucky. They are usually found on high areas (mounds or peaks) and close inspection reveals the height above sea-level  in feet! (or in hands on horses) - If you find a single diamond, heart, club or spade shape, or a combination of some or all these shapes in your hand, then you have a damn good hand.

MUSIC

As, at Prize-giving, Prof. Paul Harvey gave his vivid account of the varied and indeed exciting life of an instrumental musician at the top of his profession, it was inevitable that one should ruminate upon the KES musical tradition, its present difficulties, and its problematical future.

"Panta rhei" - everything changes - as the Greek philosopher observed. Then is not the same as now, and it is certain that the future picture will be different yet again. Pardon the platitudes! What is sure is that musical talent will out, and, if the right climate prevails, blossom as well as ever.

When Paul Harvey wielded his clarinet in the School Orchestra most instrumentalists of necessity bought their own instruments and all paid for such little instrumental tuition as was available locally. His successors today can draw on 'pool' instruments and the free services of nine visiting teachers. Currently seventy-nine players are receiving lessons under this scheme. This is excellent, though on the debit side the drop-out rate is higher than one would like. Do people sufficiently value what is free? Is there the strength of character needed to take the long view and really work to acquire a technique?

The First Orchestra, numbering today about fifty-five, is strong in wind but showing a sad decline in the String section. (Do we see in our crystal ball an American High School-type wind band playing "Colonel Bogey" and counter-marching with drum-majorettes at the ball game?). The Second Orchestra is a new creation, small in numbers but great in zeal, designed to follow up the early tuition, and meeting at the Junior School. Outside orchestral work, the Guitar groups flourish, thanks to Miss Hirst's enthusiastic work, as also Mrs. Smith's Recorder Group.

The real curse of the present situation is the split site. A young musician who is under the same roof as his seniors has from the start a standard of performance to aim at. The transport of a dozen players capable of being in the First Orchestra has worked tolerably well each week, but the same is not possible with the Choir.

Paul Harvey was not a singer, but two hundred of his fellows could and did meet each week as a full four-part choir and enjoy choral works large and small, eventually to perform them with the Orchestra. Today the trebles and most of the sopranos are at the Lower School and the tenors and basses at the Upper, with the alto-contralto line split between the two. They only get the full satisfying experience of singing as a unit at the two practices prior to public performance. All honour, then, to those who persevere with regular attendance at practices. In like manner the elders of the Madrigal Group have to kick their heels until the mini-bus delivers the bulk of the 'tune' from the other building. In spite of all only about ten of some two hundred singers failed to brave the fog and a threatened 'bus strike to sing Christmas Music at the Cathedral.

Talent will out, we said, and this has been very true of Paul Webster, composer, pianist, organist and violinist. He is the most gifted musician to have given of his talents to school and local music-making since the pre-Harvey days of the late forties. With a Gold Medal of the Royal School of Music to his credit quite early on, he became a Prize-winning Associate of the Royal College of Organists last summer, bagged both an L.R.A.M. (Piano Accomp.) and the Organ Scholarship to St. Cath's Cambridge within the same fortnight last Autumn, and will most probably be a Fellow of the R.C.O. before the summer is out. We look forward to the day when he returns to distribute the prizes!

N.J.B.

MRS. EGAN

Whilst walking past the office, gaily running around school, exchanging books, buying dinner tickets or buying back belongings, from her little horde of lost property, have you ever stopped to think what Mrs. Egan, Clerk of the Lower School has been doing with herself for the past 21 years? Nonexclusively the truth will be revealed.

Mrs. Egan was born and bred in Sheffield and attended Pupil Teachers Centre until the age of sixteen. She was very happy at school and played in the school hockey and netball teams. She entered for many of the athletic events on sports day. Her favourite subject was Maths, but she disliked French.

She has many happy memories of her childhood, especially when she, along with her brother (who is now married with three sons), and the rest of her family, went camping to Bridlington. They went hiking every weekend in all kinds of weather, and have often been knee deep in snow on the Derbyshire moors.

After leaving school, she would have liked to go to college but this wasn't possible because there were no student grants. So she started working in an office with a view to becoming a secretary. It was at this time that she became interested in foreign languages. So Mrs. Egan went to night school to learn German.

The war thwarted these ambitions as the choice then was either to enter industry or the forces. She went into industry, working for the Aeronautical Inspection Directorale, a job which took her to many parts of the British Isles. She didn't work any more until her son and daughter were at grammar school. Only then did she go to a junior school as a secretary. After three years Mrs. Egan went to a secondary school, Waltheof, which is at Manor Park, where she stayed for five years and enjoyed it very much, making friends among staff and pupils. Then she took the opportunity of working at the education office for three years.

In June of 1971, she came to King Edward VI I school, because she was anxious to get back to-school work. As she says, "I appreciate the total responsibility the challenge presented and always hope to do a good job for the school".

Mrs. Egan has many hobbies, especially knitting and sewing. She makes soft toys which she sends to church bazaars. She also likes reading, flower arranging, ballet and classical music and some pop music. But she "isn't quite the Donny Osmond Type". Mrs. Egan does not support any particular football team, but likes to watch a good match. Her favourite T.V. programmes are "Softly, Softly" and "Sports Night with Coleman". She is very fond of animals and would like to have another dog.

She was born in June and is a Cancerian. Like a lot of people she reads her horoscope in the paper but is very sceptical and is not at all superstitious. She does not believe in ghosts.

Her favourite foods are varied, but she especially likes steak and chips, roast pork and seasoned Yorkshire pud, sherry trifle and fresh cream cakes. Believe it or not, despite the fact that she is constantly turning the ice-cream van away from the school yard, she is passionately fond of ice cream.

Julia Hoyland, Amanda Ryder

 

 

Photo: R Ibbotson

VISIT TO TREETON COLLIERY

Fourteen 5A/B boys accompanied by Mr. Ayres enjoyed an exciting 2.5 hours underground visit to Treeton Colliery in April. Though small by modern standards, Treeton is a profitable long-life pit producing around 1/2 m. tons of top grade coking and industrial coal each year. The visit had a special meaning for one of the party - John Bates - whose father is an underground worker at the Colliery.

The party resembled a walking Jumble Sale as we reported to the Lamp Room to collect our essential underground equipment - one boy wearing snow-white overalls - an outfit which prompted one miner to enquire if he was a finer flour grader!

After tying broad leather belts to our waists, we hooked on the heavy lamp batteries and personal rescuers (gas masks), then donned white helmets, holding cap lamps in our hands. Finally we received two metal discs stamped with the same number - "mottles" to the miner. The alloy one must be handed to the "banksman" before entering the "cage" to descend the shaft; the brass tag is clipped securely to the battery to be kept until the return to the surface. In this simple way, the vitally important check on who is actually below ground is kept accurately.

The cage winder became our friend for life, as against expectations, he lowered us the 450 yards to the pit bottom so gently, we felt we were in a department store lift.

Once below, by alternately walking and riding on two "paddy trains" - one taking us up a 1 in 4 gradient - we reached the Tailgate of No. 9's Face about three miles from the shaft and at a point roughly half way between Whiston and the Tinsley Viaduct. Here the party reached the dramatic highlight of their visit.

After crawling painfully on hands and knees between the hissing hydraulic roof supports for about 20 yards along the 4 ft. high coalface, we crouched down in the hot, black tunnel, illuminated only by our cap lamps, and watched the giant shearer ripping 2 ft. deep slices of coal as it travelled past us, neatly dropping it onto the chain conveyor alongside. 200 yards in the distance, we could just see moving white spots - the cap lamps of miners at the Main-gate end, and could hear their forthright comments over the intercom system about the delays our visit was causing!

In these exhilarating minutes which some of us also felt were more than a little frightening, we could appreciate as never before the unique nature of the miner's daily task. We had seen in grim reality the terrifying circumstances in which the Lofthouse tragedy must have happened.

Nevertheless, far too soon for us, we were handing in our motties, and blinking into the seemingly bright glare of a dull Rotherham day. A welcome shower, and a typical pit canteen meal completed a most memorable morning for us all.

JUNIOR CHESS CLUB

It should not be forgotten that if King Edward's is to keep up its fine chess traditions all prospective players should be encouraged to play as much chess as possible. The Junior Chess Club endeavours to do this, meeting twice weekly and generally bringing about twenty players together.

The Knock-Out Competition, started just before Christmas and finished just after half-term, served to get thirty-four players playing forty-nine games that would probably not have been played otherwise. Not surprisingly it was dominated by the third years who provided all four semi-finalists. In the final G. Orton beat A. Haigh after a comedy of errors that would give any self-respecting grandmaster nightmares, should he ever hear of it.

I hope that more junior fixtures can be arranged and perhaps we will meet with more success than when we lost 101/2 - 1'/2 and 9'/2 - '/2 against Silverdale last year.

I would like to thank Mr. Sutton for his efforts on behalf of Lower School Chess.

Giles Orton.

 

Michael Szpakowski

KING EDWARD VII NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY

K.E.S.N.H.S. is the most active society in school. Every Sunday the group conducts a field meeting into the Sheffield area, and each Thursday evening an indoor meeting is held in the Upper School building. The Society aims at acquainting pupils with the animals and plants of the area, and in addition members are encouraged to consider how the various' local habitats have been altered through time by physical conditions and by man. As a result it is hoped that members will appreciate the finer qualities of the Sheffield area.

Kestrel, the Society's newsletter is published every month and circulated to pupils of a number of city schools and members of the Sorby Natural History Society. Recently members have provided two successful displays of natural history interest in the vestibule of the Upper School. Field work is at present being carried out in the Loxley Valley with an aim to creating a nature trail through the Little Matlock Wood.

The field meetings are enjoyed by everyone come rain or shine; members' amazing appetites are satisfied by kingly feasts at the end of the road. Certain members find difficulty curbing a primitive nutritional instinct at 10 a.m. often due to lack of breakfast during the ten minute rush to depart upon the expedition. However their weakened frames usually survive a game of rugby which has become an enjoyable tradition. The game has no rules and is played with whatever is at hand.

The Society is a success and is open to all who wish to acquaint themselves with a bit of England by tramping the countryside and observing the web of life.

Nigel H. Brown.

CHESS REPORT

The 1971/72 season finished with KES 'A' winning the Sheffield Junior League for the 6th successive season under the able captaincy of P. R. Burley, and also retaining their Yorkshire Schools Champion title!

The departure of several players has left the 'A' and 'B' teams weakened this season, but there seems to be an increasing interest in chess judging by the attendances at Chess Club this year; perhaps this is due to the Fisher -v- Spassky Match last July. So far this season KES 'A' and 'B' have both lost one match but have won their other matches, and everything looks set for a very close finish to the end of the 1972/73 season.

In the Sunday Times National Schools K.O. competition, KES reached the Yorkshire final, beating Doncaster, Abbeydale, High Storrs and Westfield but lost to Bradford in the final.

Thanks are due to Messrs. Bell and Sutton for organising Chess Clubs at Glossop Road and Darwin Lane respectively.

A. Belton 7M

 

photo: Eventer

RIDING

BOYS!! Dare you join your one courageous male compatriot, sit squashed to death by six females yet still undefeated in the back of a rumbling old van, and disembark at last at "Ann Barber's Riding School"?

Obviously, from your outstanding response to this exciting hobby, I think not. It's not all schooling - "Toes up! Heels down! Chest out! Elbows in!" If you want a tour of the countryside, an excuse from P.E., long-lasting admiration from your pals, or good healthy exercise, and fancy yourself as a budding Harvey Smith, remember that we all have to start somewhere and that Ann Barber's is the best place. All this for only 50p with no extra charge for transport there and back.

We promise not to laugh at your feeble first attempts; in fact our self-composure has been disturbed only once, when Mrs. Cooper treated us to an unintentional triple somersault with high kicks and splits, on being unseated.

So come and prove to us that males are not after all the weaker sex.

Anne Seale

FILM SOCIETY

The Film Society made a pronounced loss this year. A few films such as "Zulu" and "One Million Years B.C." proved very popular but attendances were weakened overall by Friday discotheques and Chess Club. Subscriptions to safeguard the future of the society will be greatly welcomed, and should be made to Mr. Jinks. All being well we shall continue next year with a more attractive programme.

Our thanks are due to Robert Holmes for his celebrated posters.

Satish Umaria.

WRITERS' CLUB

A year has passed since I surveyed the Writers' Club situation for the first time. Despite this, circumstances have conspired to keep the club's membership almost exactly the same, in defiance of its intensive recruiting campaign. New members have come and gone, and there have been visitors, the highest number of which were attracted as usual to the music and poetry meeting in January. But the hard core has remained constant, meeting practically every Monday lunch time. This has led to a kind of literary inbreeding. But all tastes are catered for. The membership has its share of doomy pessimists, classicists, romanticists both idealist and cynical, adventure fiction writers, indignant intellectuals and manic depressives. Of course it could be that they are all normal and I am weird.

Simon Baggott

STABLE NEWS

Don't be surprised if one Saturday afternoon this summer, you catch a glimpse on television of a very happy Mr. Ayres in the unsaddling enclosure at fashionable Epsom or Newmarket Races.

He is the part-owner of a classically bred 3 year old filly (a female horse) called "Lornica" and will be very disappointed if her blue and white colours are not first past the post at least once this year, if only in a minor race.

For any thoroughbred experts, Lornica's expensive pedigree is by Furlorn River ex Parthica (Parthion) and she is entered for the famous Epsom "Classic" - The Oaks in June.

 

 

Clare Young, Rhiannon Owen, Amanda Walker

 

     

Without any way marring the shadowy mystique of a settlement that has remained untouched and unchanged for so long, we now at last unveil the rare beauty of Broomhill to the pleasure of thousands of enchanted holidaymakers.

Broomhill is perfectly placed for exploring the region. Those taking the daily excursion to the wind­swept Castle ruins assemble at 1.15 on the beach to receive their hot water bottles. One of the week's highlights is the special excursion on Safari to pene­trate the hidden depths of the Botanical Gardens. Water-purifying tablets are to be obtained from Cornthwaites. We request that visitors restrain them selves from budgie-shooting during the breeding season - the budgies' that is. Only trout may be tickled in the ponds.

The more ambitious may enjoy our highly cele­brated moonlight trip to the bank. Special clothing is provided, including a nylon stocking, a wooden club and a bent fork hidden in the left-hand pocket, Please come equipped with a Marks and Spencer's plain white plastic holdall.

We also strongly recommend an unforgettable afternoon playing "Harry Worth" at the corner of Castle's furniture shop. Other local sports include the famed Broomhill litter chase and the Darwin Lane ball game, played traditionally with eight balls at a time and the whole population. 

Those with a taste for the standard forms of entertainment will not resist the excitement of the amazing death-defying KES Dodgems circuit, placed conveniently nearby the main entrance. Another notable attraction is the Tomlinson's merry-go-round. And every pleasure-seeker must experience at first hand the unique thrill of our central-heated indoor dry-dock swimming pool.

For those regretting the lack of water, the Crosspool laundry offers an attractive alternative, just wander through the door marked "Dry-Cleaning". The spinning feeling soon passes away.

When the time comes for your tearful departure, collect a fond bargain souvenir from MAC Market, if you can get the wire basket past the check-out. We advise that you undertake the expedition in pairs, as a result of the natives' inbred desire that you pay for your goods.

For the benefit of our customers we have included a short vocabulary list entitled "This Way Up" or "Talk Reit in Brum'ill".

"Aaaahh" "I affirm your remark".

"Naow" "I repudiate your remark".

"Gerrartnit".."Pardon me, but you seem to be obstructing my passage".

 "Si'thee""Behold!"

"Aow moouch" "What is the cost of the article in question?"

Anne Seale.

 

 

 

 

 

 

1972 - 73
1st XI SOCCER REPORT

Despite numerous injuries and the customary problem of established players leaving at Christmas, the 1st XI enjoyed a fairly successful season. Exley, the captain, was unfortunately injured and managed only three full games after Christmas, and Scriven, one of only three experienced players who returned from last year's X1, left during the same critical period. S. P. Smith was consistently absent on Yorkshire duty, thereby depriving the side of perhaps its outstanding player.

A young side entered the Yorkshire 7-a-side competition to gain experience and could not follow the exploits of the previous two sides, both of whom reached the finals - they were unfortunately eliminated in the second round.

But what the side lacked in experience they made up in effort, invariably giving 100%. Slack, an untried goalkeeper, made consistent progress and the only regular 'back four' players, Warwick and Lord, always played capably and reliably.

It is indeed indicative of the unsettled nature of the team, when one realises that these were the only "regulars". However, of the others, Mayor rates particular mention for blossoming into an effective and dangerous striker, scoring 19 goals.

The whole team owes a debt of gratitude to Mr. Davies for his hard work and sympathetic refereeing.

Record: P29, W15, D4, L10

E.J.E.

U15 FOOTBALL

Rumour has it that the lack of consistency evident in the team's performances through the season has been the direct result of the events of the preceding Friday night; certain players apparently lacked the stamina to participate fully in both activities.

 

Of the individual players, special mention must be made of Murray who served the team splendidly when deputising in goal for Reaney, absent ill for almost the whole of the first term. After Christmas, Murray earned his place at full-back and by the end of the season was one of the few ever presents in the side.

The nucleus of the side has been the same as in previous years, with the two Smiths providing the power in addition to showing a good deal of the skill which also characterised the play of Johnson, Woodhouse and Broomhead. Prince, as always, contrived to do the unexpected, often baffling opponents and occasionally team-mates. The full back play of Austin and hatchet-man Guest - I still have the scars to prove it - has been sound, whilst Wells and Percy established themselves in the side by the end of the season and can be well pleased with their efforts. Heaton, Palmer, Llewellyn, Shaw and Russell have had varying opportunities to display their talents and their loyalty and readiness to turn out whenever required have been much appreciated.

At the time of writing another expedition to the pin-ball paradise of Blankenberge is in prospect, giving the players their second opportunity to show those Common Market chappies how football should be played.

Playing Record: Played 23, Won 13, Drawn 5, Lost 5, Goals for 85, against 40.

D.M.M.

U14 FOOTBALL REPORT

As we expected our third season was much harder than our unbeaten run of 26 games in the second year. We started the season well with the scores much lower and with fewer draws. Then during the latter part of the season we came to a bad patch and lost 4 games in succession, but after a fine win against Barnsley (at Barnsley and in a game everyone thought was our best) we quickly found our success again. As usual G. Laine was our top goal scorer with some 48 goals, while P. Mellor our brilliant goal keeper made some outstanding saves. Our usual team for the season was:

Mellor, Sweet, Nicholson, Grundy (Capt.), Sharkly, Cooper, Moghul, Lewis, Winslow, Laine, Botherley, Peckett. Wilcock and Thompson also played.

U12 FOOTBALL

The 1972/73 season has been quite successful with results ranging from a 31 - 1 win to an 8 - 4 defeat. Our best team performance was at Maltby Grammar School when everybody played well and constructively. Our captain Ian Lewis has always played well, tackling skilfully and accurately.

OUR RESULTS:

Played

Won

Drawn

Lost

Goals Agst

Goals for.

9

5

1

3

23

44

THE SQUAD:

J. Lee; D. Duckenfield; A. Heaton; J. Pettinger; I. Lewis; J. Green; S. Wilkinson; C. Roberts; R. Sweet; P. Capener; S. Smith; P. Cain; R. Jackson; M. Smith; K. Satterthwaite.

Stephen Wilkinson 1(1)

HEDLEY CHOSEN FOR ENGLAND BUT CANNOT PLAY

Only three days after his selection for the England under-19 schoolboys' hockey team seventh-former Tony Hedley was forced to withdraw from the team with a broken wrist.

He was due to play in the Home International Schoolboys' Hockey tournament on April 10th and 11th and was selected the previous week from forty-six trialists who attended the two-day training session at St. Albans. He was to have played on the left wing and would have been King Edward VII School's first schoolboy international.

Already this season Tony has represented Yorkshire Schoolboys, scoring eleven goals in six matches, and as a result was selected for the North of England team to play in an inter-regional tournament at Loughborough in January. In these four games Tony moved from his usual left-wing position to centre-forward, from which position he scored five goals and earned himself a place in the England trials.

Tony learned most of his hockey at King Edward VI School, Southampton, before joining this school in September 1971, Next year he hopes to join the R.A.F.

I would like to take this opportunity to extend all our congratulations to him on his excellent performances this season and offer him our sympathy for the injury that caused his withdrawal from the England team.

J.R.

 

SPORT SPOTLIGHT '73
THE UNDER-13 FOOTBALL TEAM

Of the sixteen games played so far this season, the Under-13s have drawn one; only recently did they register their first victory. They have scored eighteen goals, five of these coming in the last match, at an average of 1.1 a match. The opposition have put eighty-five past them, at an average of 5.3 goals a match. As their captain Alexander Usborne explained, their poor play in the earlier part of the season was due to lack of communication, as half the team came from Westways. They came together for team practices only occasionally.

So to the team itself - a comical set of characters. The goalkeeper Robert Percy made a poor start but is playing well now. In one match the ball somehow managed to find its way into the back of the net 22 times. Next day he was suffering from a severe backache.

Number 2, Simon Ward is described as a reliable full-back with a big kick. He is also the team's top scorer with seven goals. This is quite an achievement for a defender. But I think I must point out that six of his goals were scored against his own keeper, four in one match. All the same he managed to beat him each time and we must give him credit.

Duncan Munro, nicknamed 'monkey', is another skilful back who has cleared the ball out of trouble many a time. Next comes Russell Barton, a good all-rounder, but especially good in the air and in the tackle. He has scored four goals already this season. Paul Draycott is a large, powerful player whose strong kick has enabled him to score four good goals. The captain Alex Usborne is a dominant player with a forceful tackle. Number 7, Keith Layland, has a good, accurate shot which has brought him three goals. Andrew Palmer, the right winger, is a skilful dribbler but lacks power in his tackling and his shooting, while David Ritchie snaps up easy chances well yet still needs to overcome his fear of heading the ball. John Llewelyn, the number 10, is a good player with a powerful tackle.


 

 

By far the fastest player on the pitch is little John Miller; in addition to his speed he has excellent ball control and a very accurate shot. His one fault is a tendency to hold on to the ball too long. There are others who have played in the team but these are the regular members.

On Saturday the third of March the Under 13s played one of their most important matches of the season, against Huddersfield, the team that had beaten them by 22 - 0. The game was played at Whiteley Woods and I was there on the touch-line to see what I thought would be another thrashing. But they did King Edward's proud. They were well-organised and confident throughout the match, and I would say they deserved at least a draw. At half-time I thought we were even going to win, with the scoreline resting at 4 - 2 in our favour, but two misunderstandings and two goals in the last five minutes brought victory to the Huddersfield team by 7 goals to 5. Our team was bitterly disappointed, particularly because Mr. Meredith, who had been advising them and steadily improving their play for several weeks, had promised them a bottle of pop if they won. I think he knew they were going to lose.

Graham Fellows.

 

 

RUGBY REPORT

UPPER SCHOOL:

  Played Won Drawn Lost For Agst.
1st XV 24 22 1 1 624 85
'A' XV 5 3 1 1 86 60
2nd XV 4 0 0 4 16 232

U15 XV No side this season.

1st XV

This has been a remarkable season for the 1st XV especially when one considers that only about thirty boys in the Upper School play rugby. On a wave of self-congratulation the side has pushed itself to a record minimum of defeats.

The campaign began with a victory over the Old Edwardians when we were surprised by the size and strength of the eight or nine new players. At first, skill and co-ordination were lacking but a determined squad soon developed these qualities. After thrashing Worksop College 2nd XV the team went on to defeat Temple Moor in Leeds and to achieve a notable draw against Crossley and Porter, Halifax, in a game in which we felt very much on top.

Many opposing teams were beaten by the ferocity of the front row, where hooker, Andy Simnett with socks rolled down braved the sharpened studs of the opposition. The second row, though always conserving their energy for the unexpected late rush of scoring, rose on numerous occasions to outjump and outpush more experienced forwards. The fitness and speed of the back row could be accredited to "Henry" Ford's thorough training sessions. Ian Turner, successfully controlled the pack from the No. 8 position. Our half­backs provided respectable service to the threequarters. Scrumhalf, Chris Litherland played two games with a broken hand, while his more punctual understudy, Peter Jones, had a fine game in a tough victory over the College of Education 2nd XV. The three­quarters supplied spectators with several thrilling bouts of handling. Julian Harrison and Charlie Tallent, ex-forwards, adapted themselves remarkably well to their new positions. The side had well-founded confidence in full-back Ford, and only 85 points were scored past him all season, even though - it is rumoured - he often came to the game straight from his previous night out.

The season ended with an impressive victory over a Wath G.S. side which contained several South Yorkshire U19 players.

Many thanks to Mr. Knowles, especially for his work as Secretary, and to Mr. Booth for his considerable encouragement. Also, thanks to our trainer, record-keeper, supporters, and to the reserves who spent so many games running the touch-line.

A. M. Hall
Captain of Rugby.

We entered five boys for the South Yorkshire trials this season: M. J. Ford, J. R. Phillips, A. M. Hall, I. D. Turner and A. W. Reid. Andrew Hall, who has contributed much to the success of the 1st XV in the past three years, and Martin Ford were both selected to play in the South Yorkshire U19 Schoolboys XV. Ian Turner was chosen as a travelling reserve. We are very proud of the fact that Hall was later given a Yorkshire trial and played for his County in the Yorkshire v Northumberland U 19 Schoolboys match at Gosforth.

C. P. K.

U12 RUGBY

The U 12 Rugby team started late on in the season and played three matches. Unfortunately we lost them all. First of all we played Myers Grove, then Aston Woodhouse and lastly Ashleigh. We also entered into the 9-a-side competition and won our first two matches and lost the 3rd. Not a particularly good -season but it could improve.

1st XI CRICKET, 1972.

A record of 5 wins, 8 defeats, and 6 draws was at least as good as expected. With Mann incapacitated till the final week after overindulging his notorious tackling on a dry soccer pitch, only Exley and Higginbotham remained from 1971. This limited experience was reflected in the dominance of low-scoring games. Mann's concentration was precisely what the batting lacked, and only Exley's bold and sometimes desperate use of the open spaces contributed regularly to the scoresheet. His fine undefeated 60 against De La Salle was the only half-century of the term!

With low totals to bowl against, and sodden pitches prevailing in so cold a May, opening bowlers Exley (32 wickets at 13.0) and Higginbotham (39 at 13.6) became increasingly defensive and developed into a most accurate and inexpensive pairing, except when their predilections for no-balls coincided. Their reliability inevitably restricted the opportunities of the talented slower pair, Mick Warwick (32 at 12.2) and Richard Ibbotson (23 at 14.2)', who had as much to offer in attacking roles but whose fingers were often too cold by the time they were called on.

Warwick was also one of only four with a batting average in double figures. Greatorex and Phillips each played several -valuable innings, but neither used his feet enough, if at all. Slack's style promised much more than he achieved, except in the mid-wicket area, Moghul could trust neither eye nor co­ordination sufficiently to attach the half-volley, and Higginbotham, despite the occasional rescue act, was talked out almost as often as he talked out an opponent.

The team's outcricket was again of a high order, with Ford and Moghul excelling close to the bat and Exley setting a captain's example each side of the bowler, especially with his three catches in Ibbotson's 7 -38 against Manchester G. S. The wicket-keeping was rarely dependable enough: there were no "naturals" available, and Slack usually played the part. His hair sometimes got in the way, but he was saved undue embarrassment by the limited use made of the spinners.

The Whit tour, this time in Lancashire, again experienced weather fair enough to play in, but never to enjoy. The first game was washed out as we chased 63, the second was abandoned after we had bowled 65 overs in intermittent drizzle, and our only defeat, by Kirkham, was incurred just as the rain closed in. Finally, at Lytham, an epic draw, involving 158 runs in 5 hours, was played out in conditions more characteristic of Cape Horn: umpires resembled Arctic explorers, bails were not even considered, appeals were made by gesture only, and Parnell's temerity against pace bowling with the gale was matched only by Exley's remarkably accurate 17 overs into it.

Meldrum, Hanwell, Neil Ibbotson, Mower and Ian Turner also played in at least 5 of the 22 games started, while Straker's plimsolls and black socks were allowed a farewell airing against last year's Captain's XI. John Little was an efficient statistician and frequent scorer.

U12 CRICKET

One of our matches for last season was cancelled and this left us with only the match against Myers Grove. Alex Usborne and Timothy West set up a stand of 17 but nobody else scored well. Although their best batsman was bowled first ball by David Ritchie, Myers Grove won by nine wickets.

D. Garlick.

U13 CRICKET

The U13 Cricket team had a good season in the summer; we played 15 marches and lost only 3. In the last match we were beaten by only one run. We kept up a high standard throughout the season, and some good batting was seen, especially from the captain Philip Hayes.

2nd XI CRICKET REPORT

Miraculously enough we managed to persuade eleven people to turn out for every match despite the heavy exam schedule. The team was a mixed combination of thwarted first eleven players, certain individuals who rediscovered the joys of cricket after several years of inactivity and others who were willing to pay exorbitant coach fares.

Special mention must go to the demon front-line bowling attack of Ridgeway and Hetherington, ably supported by Straker, who at Manchester produced the best performance of the season, Smith Hanwell and Parnell. On occasions we had an 'all seam' attack; however the varying styles of these bowlers, some swinging the ball from outside the leg stump to further outside the leg stump, others causing the slips to claim "danger money". This meant the occasional straight ball caused devastation.

Of the batting little need be said; indeed little can be said for there was not much of it. We never recovered from the loss of Turner, I.D., Parnell and Meldrum, our batting stars, who were frequently called to higher duty Although nearly unbeaten, we did lose a few, often by close margins such as nine wickets.

The highlight of the season was when we went to Pontefract Grammar School, watched it rain for two hours and came home again. But team spirit was high even if our concentration on the beloved summer game was low.

M.J.T.

Players:
Turner, M.J., Turner, I.D., Hetherington; Ridgeway, Straker, Smith S.P., Butt, Mower, Hanwell, Meldrum, Parnell, Pardham, Holt, Reid, Clarke, A., Hawksbill, Ibbotson and Charlesworth.

ATHLETICS

In view of the fact that we were Sheffield Champions last year, 1972 was perhaps a disappointing season. However, there were some notable successes at District level where the Intermediate team came first beating the eventual City champions, Westfield School by 9 points. Strength in depth at the Intermediate level was emphasised in the Track and Field league where the boys went forward to the finals at Hillsborough Stadium.

At the Sheffield Schools Athletics Championships the school came fifth with D. Henry and P. Stacey winning medals in the javelin and steeplechase respectively.

We now look forward to the 1973 season and the continuing success of girl athletes like S. Marsden and M. Bradford, but also we would welcome the participation of a greater number of pupils in the enjoyment of athletics.

U12 and U13 ATHLETICS

In the summer term the Boys' Athletics team played two matches and competed in one Championship. The U 12s and the U 13s combined to form the Junior team. One of the matches, which we only just lost, was an evening meeting at West­field. The other match, which we won in spite of having a weakened team, was against Tapton. The City Championship was at Hillsborough Park, and we didn't do at all well in the final.

S. Fenwick.

ROUNDERS

The Rounders team was quite successful last year. We lost a few games and had a particularly hard time against Hinde House. Fortunately our only injuries were a few slips in the mud and bruised arms and shins.

Overall our performance was good, considering the sheer size of some of our opponents.

G. Cooke.

U14 RUGBY

Played

Won

Lost

For

Against

17

8

9

230

344

Throughout the season an injury stricken team tried hard to maintain a satisfactory record. No less than seven members of the team received serious injuries.

We started off poorly with only one win in five games. Then a record win, 48 v 4 against City, boosted the moral when ten very good tries were scored. This was the start of an improvement which we maintained through the consistently through the middle of the season, for out of the ten remaining games half resulted in well-earned victories.

Injuries had struck savagely before the 9-a-side competition was held. C. Jordan, and D. Linsay both had broken collar bones while Sutherland, J. Hudson, Fellows, Whittaker Culver, Markham were also unable to play. A weak but enthusiastic team entered and managed to win their first match but were knocked out in the second.

Two players got half of the season's total points, with Sutherland getting 30 and Hayes 84, which is the team record.

P. Hayes.

VOLLEYBALL

Volleyball has, in certain other countries, and especially in Eastern Europe, been for many years one of the most popular participant and spectator sports. In this country, however, it remains very much a minority one - though it has received a boost in recent years and more particularly since the Munich Olympics.

Since September there has been a volleyball option on fourth year games afternoons and volleyball clubs in both buildings of our school.

Recently we have played our first matches, these being in the Yorkshire Schools tournaments at Huddersfield Polytechnic. The under 16 age group managed to win three out of their four games, easily beating Maltby and Crawshaw and narrowly succeeding over St, Anthony's Middlesbrough - no mean feat considering that this last mentioned has a number of players in the England youth squad!

To the under 15 tournament we sent two teams, though they unfortunately won only one match between them. The 'B' team were heavily defeated, but two of the 'A' team's defeats were in closely fought matches.

The under 18's also won one game, against Crawshaw (though none of our players were of the maximum age) and suffered two defeats, one of which was at the hands of Buttershaw Bradford, who have a team in the Yorkshire first division.

The greatest achievement was by the under 14's who succeeded in gaining third place out of twelve teams in their competition after coming second in their group. The play­off for third and fourth places against a team who had already beaten them was very exciting. Having got a good lead they weathered a startling comeback to get home by two points.

It is hoped that in the future volleyball will develop in our area, and we shall be able to play a leading role. We shall provide one of the teams giving a volleyball demonstration at Sheffield Polytechnic one Saturday early in May and hope to join a South Yorkshire second division of the Yorkshire League which is to commence its first season in October.

We still need interested players from all years to be the stars of the future!

LOWER SCHOOL CROSS COUNTRY REPORT

The 72/73 season was a good one for our Cross-Country team. At times our team was rather small and we dropped a few places in the league when only three turned up at Hinde House, due to illness. At the Club Championship at Graves Park our team came third and Charles, Fenwick and Orton got medals. Next week, also at Graves Park we came 12th in the City Championships. At Disley, the Northern Schools Championship, we came 30th out of the 92 teams and in, the Sheffield School's League we finished 14th. Over all it was a very successful season.

The team was from Charles, Fenwick, Orton, Stittle, Tuke, Leonard, Baker, Bradford, Wilkinson, Chambers, Harrison and a few others.

CROSS-COUNTRY

This year our most successful team has been the intermediates, who have gained first place honours several times. The junior team is showing constant improvement, The senior team, although sadly depleted in numbers, has made determined efforts to make up for lost members and has gained first place honours in some of the league races. P. Stacey, S. Manterfield and P. G. Munn were all chosen to run for Sheffield.

The school was placed third in the 40th Netherthorpe cross-country run in the North Midlands Championships. Particularly pleasing were the positions of Stacey (4th), Munn (9th), Woo (12th) and Manterfield (18th).

The final league positions were as follows :­

Cliff Watson.

Junior runners: Baker, Bell, Bradford, Caplan, Chambers, Charles, Fenwick, Harrison, A. Johnson, P. Johnson, Lee, Lewis, Orton, Pettinger, Smith, Stittle, Thostle, Tuke, Wilkinson.

Intermediates: Boshier, Habgood, Hopkinson, Hunter, Little, Manterfield, Norris, Peake, Robinson, Stacey, Wardle.

Seniors: Belton, Blagden, Dunbar, Eddowes, Munn, Pollard, Poole, Reynolds, Senneck, Watson, Willey, Woo.

ORIENTEERING REPORT

Unfortunately, last year many of our members left. This has brought about a change in the club. It has moved completely away from the "Cross Country Club" and has gained a separate and consistent membership. The club thanks Mr. J. C. Allen, who has spent much time organising events for the club, and it wishes him well in his new job.

C. Watson.

TRIPLE CUP WINNERS IN SHEFFIELD & DISTRICT JUNIOR TENNIS HOCKEY

 
Kevin Charlesworth (left), Under 16 Singles Champion, with his partner Ian McHale, winner of the Under 14 Singles.
Together they went on to collect the Under 18 Handicap Doubles.

Hockey

The third year hockey team has had a good season, in spite of a number of injuries such as broken teeth and badly bruised thumbs They should finish in a respectable position in the league.

The second years have had a less successful season. They have had some very disappointing results, but should soon improve.

 

Played

Lost

Drawn

Won

U14

16

2

7

7

U13

6

3

1

2

NETBALL

 

Played

Lost

Drawn

Won

U14 (A)

6

4

2

-

U14 (B)

2

2

-

-

U13 (A)

11

5

2

4

U13 (B)

5

5

-

-

U12 (A)

3

2

-

1

U12 (B)

2

1

-

1

GIRLS' GAMES REPORT --- MAY 1972 to EASTER 1973

This was a good year with all activities well supported and the games facilities rarely out of use. All results are completed up to going to press.

SUMMER TERM

Analysis of matches

Played

Won

Drawn

Lost

Junior Rounders

6

 

1

5

Senior Rounders

5

3

1

1

Under 14 Tennis 'A' Team

7

5

 

2

Under 14 Tennis 'B' Team

8

4

 

4

ATHLETICS

The teams competed in two track league fixtures, two district sports meetings, City Finals and a friendly match against Westfield. The mixed Intermediate team won their district sports and a mixed Junior and Intermediate team finished fourth in City Finals. Sheila Marsden and Wendy Theaker were selected to represent Sheffield at the Yorkshire Championships in the Intermediate 400 metres and long jump respectively. Sonia Wilson and Wendy Theaker became City Champions in Junior Shot and Intermediate Long Jump.

Intermediate Team: W. Theaker, L. West, S. Marsden, M. Douglas, J. Gonez, E. Heathcote, A. Bottom.

Junior Team: S. Andrews, S. Bloor, C. Gesney, S. Wilson, L. Chadwick, G. Cooke, J. Lee, J. Ellis, M. Bradford, D. Turner, C. Jackson, A. Franklin, J. Civil, S. Biggs, J. Roberts, S. Fellows, S. Moody, C. Goulding, M. Hoytink, P. Daykin, D. Armitage, H. Walford, B. Cutler, J. Ventour, S. Cooke, G. Simm, A. Bardsley, P. Skelton, J. Moulson F. Rodgers, J. Allen, J. Wigmore, A. Wink.

Senior Team: J. Simm, J. Mattocks, E. Cowell, N. Rose, S. Barabosz.

Under 14 Tennis: S. Moody, P. Daykin, H. Walford, J. Woodhouse, J. Moulson, G. Ketteringham, J. Wilson, M. Hoytink, C. Gosney, D. Armitage, J. Allen, G. Littlewood, J. Green.

Senior Rounders: C. Brown, M. Douglas, J. Bates, S. Marsden, J. Gonez, J. Allen, D. Armitage, C. Dallas, J. Skelley, C. Gosney, S. Wilson, A. Bottom, J. Lewis.

Junior Rounders: from - J. Wigmore, M. Hoytink, C. Goulding, V. Stones, G. Simm, J. Mycock,

S. Mycock, G. Cooke, J. Pettinger, D. Gould, S. Blackburn, S. Bingham, J. Bates, J. Beeston, J. Lee, S. Cooke, C. Battye, J. Roberts, F. Bloor, S. Bloor.

HOUSE TOURNAMENT RESULTS:

Winners:

1st year Rounders

Chantry

 

2nd year Rounders

Montgomery

 

3rd year Rounders

Sorby

 

2nd year Tennis

Montgomery

 

3rd year Tennis

Chantry

 

2nd year Athletics

Bolsover

WINTER SEASON

This was a very busy season with many girls participating in the teams. The final league positions were not available at the time of going to press.

Analysis of matches

Played

Won

Drawn

Lost

Under 18 Netball

4

2

1

1

Under 16 Netball

13

8

1

4

Under 14 Netball 'A' Team

9

1

2

6

Under 14 Netball 'B' Team

2

   

2

Under 13 Netball 'A' Team

20

6

2

12

Under 13 Netball 'B' Team

6

-

 

6

Under 12 Netball 'A' Team

8

3

 

5

Under 12 Netball 'B' Team

6

3

 

3

Under 14 Hockey

26

17

7

2

Under 13 Hockey

8

2

2

4

Under 16 Badminton

9

3

 

6

The Intermediate cross country team enjoyed a highly successful season, winning the league championships for the third year running. Four girls were selected for the Sheffield teams which ran at the Yorkshire Championships; they were J. Simm, J. Mattocks, M. Bradford, S. Marsden. In the individual league table, Mandy Bradford was the clear winner and Sheila Marsden finished in third place.

Senior Team: J. Simm, J. Mattocks.

Intermediate Team: M. Bradford, S. Marsden, S. Wilson P. Daykin, F. Rodgers, S. Hilbert. Junior Team: S. Bloor, E. Sutherland, D. Rose, H. Wingfield, H. Thompson, K. Jones, J. Calder.

Under 18 Netball: S. Froggatt, K. Beasley, J. Stainforth, W. Theaker (Capt.) J. Mattocks, J. Simm, M. Douglas, L. West.

Under 16 Netball: S. Moody, J. Hutchinson, J. Fieldsend, J. Wigmore, G. Cooke, M. Douglas (Capt.) G. Littlewood, A. Prince, H. Walford, P. Daykin, S. Marsden.

Under 14 Netball 'A' Team: C. Ashmore, J. Wigmore, K. Moulson, C. Mann, G. Cooke, A. Franklin, C. Goulding.

Under 14 Netball 'B' Team: E. O'Dea, S. Throssell, H. Garvin, S. Burton, R. Walshaw, W. Davidson, J. Evans, J. Chadwick, K. Worrall.

Under 13 Netball 'A' Team: C. Battye, P. Fieldsend (Capt.) F. Bloor, C. Jones, D. Popat, J. Roberts, S. Bloor, S. Cooke.

Under 13 Netball 'B' Team: A. Smith, R. Tomlinson, S. Martin, H. Fawcett, K. Sillitoe, K. Gilbert, A. Doherty, B. Hannerman, E. Sutherland.

Under 12 Netball 'A' Team: J. Alderson (Capt.), M. Turner, E. Chadwick, J. Wainwright, P. Wilkinson, C. Civil, M. Figures.

Under 12 Netball 'B' Team: J. Fielding, A. Fielding, J. Wilcox, S. Donkersley, C. Leversidge, E. Clements, K. Fishburn, H. Orton, L. Mann, A. Pinnington.

Under 14 Hockey: S. Mycock, L. Chadwick, J. Garner, J. Mycock, J. Pettinger, G. Simm, J. Lee (Capt), M. Hoytink, J. Green, S. Bingham, A. Bardsley, J. Crabbe, C. Young.

Under 13 Hockey: A. Ansell, C. James (Capt.), W. Hardcastle, E. Sutherland, D. Rose, A. Smith, J. Bertram, A. Osgerby, H. Wingfield, W. Robson, D. Priest, C. Jones, S. Bloor.

Under 16 Badminton: J. Bates, P. Daykin, G. Littlewood, G. Kennedy, C. Brown, T. Catliff.

The Olympic gymnastics club continued to flourish and grow. Two girls - Katy Sime and Gillian Cooke, regularly attended Park gymnastics club for extra coaching and Katy has been selected for further coaching with the Yorkshire Junior squad. Both these girls also qualified for the finals of the National set sequence competition at Crystal Palace in March. A team was entered for the Sheffield Schools' Gymnastics qualifying competition and they found the experience invaluable. Gillian Cooke was the overall winner in Section 2 and Katy Sime was second in section one. Both girls go through to the finals competition in May. The team comprised:- K. Sime, G. Cooke, A. Wink, G. Mappin, S. Cooke, C. Cower, B. Rains.

The dance group worked hard all year and were honoured once again by a visit from three members of Ballet Rambert in June 1972 who were most encouraging and inspiring in their comments. The group performed 'Kaleidoscope' at the School Concert last year and 'Evil Eye' at the annual dance evening on April 11th this year. Again this was a well attended event with over three hundred girls performing.

Group members: S. Ward, H. Osgerby, J. Moulson, S. Morgan, H. Walford, J. Wilson, S. Hilbert,

J. McKay, J. Fieldsend, J. Hutchinson, D. Gent, M. Organ, M. Coe, D. French, B. Belton, S. Fellows, P. Skelton, K. Sime.

A mixed swimming team competed in the annual district gala at Heeley Baths in March and finished in Fourth place -

Team: K. Steiner, J. Wilcox, P. Fieldsend, S. Burton, A. Doherty, G. Cooke, C. Young, S. Marsden, V. Hirst, S. Faulkner, M. Douglas, J. Mattocks, J. Simm, A. Fielding, J. Fielding, S. Donkersley, J. Calder, S. Gibson, D. Armitage, J. Holmes, J. Williams.

ATHLETIC CHAMPIONSHIPS 1972

TRACK:

EVENT

WINNER

HOUSE

Time/Dist.

80m

First year Boys

J. Spencer

S

12'0

 

First year Girls

R. Tomlinson

S

10'6" R

 

Junior Girls

L. Chadwick

B

12'1"

100m

Junior Boys

C. Jordan

B

14'9"

 

Junior Girls

J. Lee

M

14'8"

 

Inter Boys

D. Perks

C

12.4

 

Inter Girls

S. Wilson

S

14.7

 

Senior Boys

E. Exley

M

12.2 R

 

Senior Girls

W. Theaker

M

14.6 R

200m

Junior Boys

C. Jordan

B

29.9

 

Junior Girls

J. Lee

M

31'6"

 

Inter Boys

D. Perks

C

26'2"

 

Inter Girls

S. Marsden

S

30'1"

 

Senior Boys

E. Exley

M

24.7 R

 

Senior Girls

J. Simm

B

31.1

400m

Junior Boys

A. Moghul

S

72.2

 

Junior Girls

S. Bloor

C

75.4

 

Inter Boys

P. Stacey

B

57.8 R

 

Senior Boys

R. O'Brien

B

54.7 R

 

Inter Girls

M. Bradford

S

69.0

 

Senior Girls

J. Simm

B

72.2

800m

Junior Boys

= S. Crooks

S

2.52

   

= O. Kenyon

S

2.52

 

Junior Girls

S. Bloor

C

3.3.9

 

Inter Boys

P. Stacey

B

2.09.5 R

 

Inter Girls

M. Bradford

S

2.46.7 R

 

Senior Boys

R. O'Brien

B

2.15.8

 

Senior Girls

J. Simm

B

2.45.3

1500m

Junior Boys

A. Moghul

S

5.51

 

Inter Boys

P. Stacey

B

4.47.6

 

Senior Boys

R. Hedley

S

4.52

Hurdles

Junior Boys

D. Munro

B

16.8

 

Junior Girls

G. Cooke

B

13.9

 

Inter Boys

K. Charlesworth

B

19.25

 

Inter Girls

P. Skelton

S

15.4

 

Senior Boys

A. Hedley

S

16.7

Relay

Junior Boys

Sorby

 

61.8

 

Junior Girls

Bolsover

 

62.4 R

 

Inter Boys

Bolsover

 

51.7 R

 

Inter Girls

Sorby

 

60.0 R

 

Senior Boys

Sorby

 

50.1

FIELD: Rounders Ball

Junior Girls

M. Hoytink

S

120'4'/2"

Javelin

Junior Boys

G. Laine

C

74'10"

 

Inter Girls

P. Daykin

B

67'11'/2" R

 

Inter Boys

D. Henry

B

137.32

 

Senior Boys

A. Ketteringham

B

137.5

 

Senior Girls

E. Heathcote

B

44'9'/2"

Discus

Junior Boys

P. Sutherland

M

80'0"

 

Inter Girls

S. Wilson

S

50'6"

 

Inter Boys

S. Joel

S

84'11"

 

Senior Boys

M. Ford

B

104'7"

 

Senior Girls

E. Heathcote

B

60'1"

Shot

Junior Boys

S. Crookes

S

26'9"

 

Junior Girls

M. Hoytink

S

20'11"

 

Inter Boys

F. Smith

S

33'4"

 

Inter Girls

S. Wilson

S

26'5"

 

Senior Boys

M. Ford

B

35'5"

 

Senior Girls

W. Theaker

M

24'4"

High Jump

Junior Boys

P. Whiteley

C

4'2"

 

Junior Girls

G. Cooke

B

4'0" R

 

Inter Boys

C. Teale

B

4'3"

 

Inter Girls

S. Marsden

S

3'10"

 

Senior Boys

P. Burkinshaw

S

5'0"

 

Senior Girls

S. Malone

B

3'6"

Long Jump

Junior Boys

S. Fenwick

B

14'0"

 

Junior Girls

L. Chadwick

B

13'0"

 

Inter Boys

D. Perks

C

18'1"

 

Inter Girls

M Bradford

S

13.111/2"

 

Senior Boys

A. Scriven

M

20'2'/2"

 

Senior Girls

W. Theaker

M

15'51/2"

Triple

Inter Boys

C. Shaw

B

34'9"

 

Senior Boys

P. Burkinshaw

S

36'8"

Pole Vault

Inter Boys

NO EVENT

   
 

Senior Boys

A. France

B

 

CHAMPION ATHLETES                                                                                     

Junior Boys

A. Moghul

S

CHAMPION HOUSE

 

Junior Girls

L. Chadwick

B

   
 

G. Cooke

B

1st BOLSOVER

572

 

J. Lee

M

2nd SORBY

431

Inter Boys

P. Stacey

B

3rd MONTGOMERY

244

 

D. Perks

C

4th CHANTRY

215

Inter Girls

M. Bradford

S

   

Senior Boys

R. O'Brien

B

   
 

E. Exley

M

   

Senior Girls

J. Simm

B

   
 

W. Theaker

M