Philip Smith

contents

Editorial

8

School Notes

8

Prize Distribution

9

House Reports

4

Hororscope

6

Poems

8

The Rake's Progress

10 to 12

Talkshop, Youth Action

13

"Plop"

14

The Tear Trap

16

Haw Haw Haw 0

18

Writer's Club, The Art Society

19

School Dins

20

Poems

22

Island of the Winds

24

Poems

25

There's no Gravity

27

The Physicists

28

The Backs ...

30

End of an Era

31

History Society, The Fly-

32

King-ky Edwardian Style

33 to 35

Poems

36

Kestionnaire

37 to 39

What is it? ...

40

What Christmas is

42

A Tribute to Kes Chess

43

Autumn, Natural History Society

44

Thunderstorm, Wet!

45

The School Bus ...

46

A Splash of Oil

48

The Beach, Three Haiku

49

One, Two, Three, Go ...

50

Autumn 1971: Lake District Trip

51

"Robinsons Crusade" ...

52

Kesmusic

53

Christian Forum

54

Sausage, Egg, Chips, Beans

55

Kesquiz

56

Easy Kesword

57

Crossword ...

58

Word-ladder, Under 15 Football

59

Sports Reports

60 to 74

Answers

75

Kesads

76

Solutions to Crossword

77

Word Ladder - A Solution

78

EDITORIAL STAFF

Nigel Wood

Mark Gore

Jean Nelson

Dave Seal

Simon Robinson

Simon Baggott

Janette Fletcher

Fiona Shapeero

Karen Frost

     

THE EDITORIAL

A magazine is nothing if not relevant; that is why image, style and content have all changed over the last few years. We know that we are now comp. and co-ed but perhaps such obvious changes merely disguise the fact that the pupils' outlook has changed as well.

Certainly the mass media would have it that rather than playing our part within the framework of the school, we are now asserting our own individuality despite it.

A school magazine, whether trad or trendy should testify to the fact that although we may all try to wear a similar uniform, we are still individuals for all that. In other words, the school magazine should illustrate the activities of the school and of its individuals, and suggest that the two need not be working against each other but in harmony.

Hence the variety. You want to know how you stand in the pocket money stakes? Consult our questionnaire. You've never trusted yourself to the school mini-bus? We've road tested it. We've walked the Pennine Way, seen Bradford's last trolleybus, played games, written poems and taken lots of photos. Nowadays we like to think we make things happen in Kesmag.

NIGEL WOOD

SCHOOL NOTES

We offer our best wishes to staff who have moved on to pastures new. Mr. Chapman has entered the field of educational administration and Sunday League football in Lincoln and Mr. Reid had moved to a similar position but with Saturday afternoon rugby in Burnley. Mr. Green has moved down the road to the Programmed Learning Unit at Sheffield University while Mr. Hillam has travelled further, to King Edward's School, Fiveways, Birmingham where he is Head of Economics and Chief Scout. We lament the untimely departure of Mr. Vickerman to New Zealand where fortunately the clocks are some hours behind G.M.T. Miss Mappin has taken to the professional tennis circuit where we wish her much success and hope for a few free tickets for the Centre Court.

Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. Sutton on the birth of Alexander Julian, to Mr. and Mrs. Anderson on the birth of Richard Malcolm and to Mr. Marcer on the birth of his Ph.D.

We congratulate Miss Jepson on becoming Mrs. Langsley and Miss Lazenby on becoming Mrs. Civico. The timetable will never be the same again.

PRIZE DISTRIBUTION

The Prize Distribution was held in the City Hall on January 24th. Ald. W. Owen chaired the proceedings and prizes were presented by Mr. J. Stuart Maclure, Editor of the Times Educational Supplement.

In his report the Headmaster stressed that since last year we had waited in vain for any clear plan to give us a school on a single site. He also referred to the present difficulties of accommodation in buildings which had been designed for different purposes and for fewer children. Nevertheless he was able to point to stimulating curriculum development throughout the school and to examination results well up to our former standards. Sport continued to flourish and some of the details were very impressive. The senior soccer and rugby teams both enjoyed their most successful season ever, while we were told that no fewer than 25% of the girls in the school were playing for teams. Traditional features of school life such as the plays and the annual concert continued to be high points in the school calendar but in fact the life of King Edwards was enriched by a variety of school activities and societies too numerous to mention individually. The report concluded with a tribute to the peerless Mr. Waghorn who retired last summer and to a staff which was prepared to expend so much time and energy to make success possible in a geographical situation which was far from ideal.

Mr. Maclure recognised in the invitation made to him to present the prizes a sure sign of his own advancing years; it was the acid test of old age. He hoped he wouldn't make the same faux pas as the Bishop who, presenting prizes at a girls' school, asked several of the girls, "What are you doing when you leave here?" Mr. Maclure said he was speaking to three audiences - staff, parents and pupils. Since exams were designed to test the staff he offered the staff his congratulations. He warned parents that they were in for a difficult time. Things were changing rapidly and in the face of this tolerance and patience were needed. For the pupils there was consolation; prizes, said Mr. Maclure, were by definition for the few and they were not always the most important things. "Education", he said, "is what is left when we forget everything we learned at school." He predicted "a rough ride during the next thirty years; they will be exciting and full of anxiety." His final word to pupils: "Be tolerant to your parents." The Times have certainly changed!

We were very grateful to Mr. Maclure for presenting the prizes and to Ald. Owen for granting the customary day's holiday. The evening ended with the usual varied and thoroughly enjoyable Musical Entertainment.

House Reports

BOLSOVER

The amalgamation of Arundel and Chatsworth has had a fair amount of success in all age groups, which should be extended during the second half of the year. The senior boys tied for 1st place in the football league, whilst the juniors were placed 2nd, which included a 12 - 0 victory over Sorby.

The 3rd Year Girls won the Cross Country and Hockey which gave them overall victory in a four event competition. The junior girls triumphed in the netball competition, whilst the 1st Year boys matched this feat in the Cross Country.

We are grateful for the services of the team captains who often have a very difficult job, though they have managed with obvious success.

CHANTRY

Chantry, the amalgam of Clumber and Haddon, has enjoyed only moderate success during the first two terms of its existence.

Despite contributing half the 1st XI squad, the senior soccer team has been prevented by injuries and the weather from winning any tournament outright. However, the intermediate and 3rd year teams did succeed in doing so, an achievement which promises well for the future.

Apart from football, Chantry has had few opportunities to compete in other winter games competitions. However, it is hoped that the house will achieve greater success in the summer.

MONTGOMERY

The amalgamation of two of the most eminent of the old houses to form Montgomery has been carried out with ease in both buildings and we look forward to much success.

Already the house waterpolo team, under the captaincy of A. W. Gravestock has won both the league and the knock-out competition, conceding only one goal in both competitions. The house also won the Swimming Distance Trophy.

The senior Football team also won their league along with two other houses, and the sevens competition. In the senior school no other competitions have been held, but we have a very strong rugby team and we expect to do well.

The junior school teams have met with little success recently.

We would like to thank all the members of staff in the house for their support and assistance.

M.W.G.

On behalf of the house staff, I would like to thank all the captains for their services.

C.H.B.

SORBY

With the departure of Jepson, the senior school seemed to be lacking in any real strength, which was reflected in their results. Every game was lost in the football and the results were scarcely better in waterpolo. This could not be attributed to lack of effort, but more to a lack of good players in the house.

Ironically the B-team won all their games, and the cross-country team dominated the senior school championship, the first three places going to Reynolds, Dutfield and Willey. Finally, the future looks much brighter judging by the performance of the Junior and Middle Schools who fared much better.


"Euphemism": A strange way to commit suicide.

From a history exam: "The inventor of Communism was Churchill."

From an economics answer: "... prices of goods would go down and so consummation by the local population increases."

From an answer on "Gulliver's Travels": ...when I observed in this abdominal animal a human figure."

 

THE PAST

I remember very well
what my mother
used to say.
"Wash your hands before
eating your food".
Then my father
arguing about my career.
Those were happy years
in my life.

Now there's nobody to talk to.
People take one look at me
and go on their way.

Begging is not
the way to live.
I used to laugh at beggars.
I never thought I would end up as one
myself.

The desert is the only place
where I can think
what will happen
to me
next.

Sharon Swift 3R

 

 

AUTUMN

The cold is strong and wild
Like a strong brown lion.
It crawls under doors at night,
And misery awakes.

The cold is strong and wild,
Like a wolf in pitch of night.
It howls and yelps in day,
And misery grows.

The cold is strong and wild
Like a long, sleek shark.
Its teeth bite in your flesh
And misery grows.

The cold dies down
Like a lion in sleep.
It leaves its mark like shadows
But happiness awakes.

Michael A. Butler 2P

THE SPELL FOR EVERLASTING LIFE.

One hat full of lion's blood
A cat's eyeball, a pound of mud.
Add a touch of spider meat,
Four chickens' hearts, two dragons' feet,
Finely powdered ants' kneecaps,
Plus some butterfly wing perhaps.
Stir in a lock of wizard's hair,
Stir and taste it if you dare.
Drink a spoonful with great care
Then eat the brain of a mad March hare
Through the rain and stormy weather
- Do this and you will live for ever.
But if you wish to shed the curse
Add the ingredients in reverse.

David Pearson 1 (1)

THE THINKER

Alone in a room
No light.
Alone with her soul,
No sound.
Alone with her thoughts,
No one to disturb her.
Alone for the sake of being
Alone.

Her thoughts speak loudly
About the past
And echoes fill the room
The light flows in,
Her thoughts drift out
Around the four white walls.

Jane Wilson 3Y

 

THE WALL

I don't know what's behind the wall,
maybe a knight in armour
on a prancing horse,
with a silver sword
and a great black shield.

I don't know what's behind the wall,
maybe a tiger waiting to pounce,
to give its prey no chance.

Glyn Staniforth 1 (1)

 

 

TRIUMPH

Latin Reading Competition abandoned. Banned from Rugby team for excessively violent play - universally respected.
Reads from "Methodist Recorder" in Assembly, Head Prefect accepts combustible carcinogen.

Father on Board of Governors.

 

TEMPTATION

Judged to be possible Scholarship material. Turns to drink. Subscribes to 'N.w St.t.sm.n.' Reads 'L.ttl. R.D Sch..lb..k'

 

11

I

 

 

TALKSHOP

Talkshop isn't a conventional school society. As the name implies, it's an informal get-together where people are encouraged to talk. First of all though, they listen. Mrs. Kelly of Sheffield Society for Psychical Research got everybody thinking; so did Detective Sergeant Herald of Woodseats C.I.D. The following week there's a follow-up meeting where people raise points and offer opinions.

Now it's up to you. Who would you like to hear? Who would spark off a good discussion? Ideas to Mr. Wood or Mrs. Ward.

YOUTH ACTION

For nearly everyone, Youth Action is not a soft option at all. Perhaps I am thinking particularly of those who visit the Oughtibridge Spastic Centre, or Lodge Moor Hospital, or the Handicapped People's Centre on Psalter Lane; in many cases these visits involve long bus journeys there and back, stark white hospital corridors and hospital beds, people who have been crippled from birth or will be crippled for the rest of their lives. Yet they are people, and those who visit them can do some tremendous work to help them, and gain in return friendship - and perhaps once a year a five course Christmas dinner.

Of course, this give and take applies also to the other aspects of Youth Action; there are girls and boys who help out with young children's play groups, and are, I am sure, thoroughly entertained as well as exhausted; there are those also who visit old people, to do their shopping or just sit and listen - listen, I say, because loneliness has a remarkable power to loosen the tongue. "Dead boring?" In fact it is not boring at all to those who are wide awake to all that is fascinating in everyday life. These visits are made every week, and some of them are even continued through the holidays.

In addition, Youth Action organises gardening and decorating groups to help old people who cannot afford to pay. The biggest single event of the year is the shopping trip to Pauldens, a rare outing for many old people from all over Sheffield. But, while they have a chance of seeing, if not buying, the new lines that are in the shops, their Youth Action helpers are at the same time given the chance of proving their skill at manoeuvring a wheel chair, and avoiding the stalls, the other wheel chairs and the ankles of the regular shoppers.

Thanks are due to Miss Glass for organising all these activities.

Behind my dressing table there is, of all things, my father's home-made wine. "It's the warmest place in the house, and it's out of the way," my father says.

My bedroom is at the top of the house, you see, and it might be out of the way for him but it certainly isn't for me.

Endless nights I have lain awake listening to the infernal "plop, plop" of his rhubarb wine fermenting, counting the plops instead of sheep. One thousand, three hundred and thirty-three, one thousand three hundred and thirty-four.

In winter it is worse, for then my room is the coldest in the house and he rigs up a ray lamp to keep it warm (the wine, not me).

The famous ray lamp has also hindered my sleep. On cold winter evenings when six degrees of frost cover the house, I love nothing more than to settle down to a sleepless night with the buzz from the ray lamp and the infernal plop. A pleasant duet. How I wish I could be rid of the poisonous concoction from behind the dressing-table! Why doesn't he take up something sensible like karate or jam-making?

Jayne Parkinson 5B

The tinker was in court charged with stealing an overcoat.

"My man", said the Judge, "three years ago you were before me charged with the same offence." "I know", said the tinker, "how long do you think an overcoat lasts?"

14

"I am not the half,"
The older man than lucky from Great Wars,
"The half the man",
Than clean-shaven from light-brown snapshots
"The man",
(Even than clogs on cobbles)
"I used to be".
Said.

But your industrial
And clerical Training,
Added to your not unobtrusive Age problem,
Persuade me that the building trade
Is not to be your last years' vocation.
(And even lavatory attendants are now in little demand).

David Smith 8MS

LEADING SEAMAN HEATH

The P.M. was a happy man,
Though he'd got no right to be,
With half his country starving
And their wages all at sea.

But when he wasn't smiling,
Or sailing on his yacht,
Or playing on his organ,
He really did a lot.

He held a cabinet meeting
A dozen times a week,
To try and stop his country
From sailing up the creek.

He argued with the miners
To try and cut their pay,
And when they asked the reason
This was all that he could say:

"We'll give you a Better Tomorrow
For your daughters and your sons".
To which they answered simply:
"Tomorrow, Never Comes!"

Simon Chandler 5X

 

 

 

6

I

 

 

H.B.D. (or "Herbie" as he is more widely and affectionately known) did not view the idea of a personal profile as an alarming one because as he quickly pointed out, his predecessors in this spot in "Kes Mag" have all in some measure, in the school or out, achieved promotion. Therefore, conscious that the eyes of the education authorities will be riveted to this space, we wish him good luck.

However, "Herbie" has never been an exactly reticent character, a trait he may have inherited from his native Keighley, a particularly hard and tough environment with one of the highest crime rates in the country at that time. At the local school, he became House Captain and confesses a certain affection for Maths, especially with the legendary "Basher" Braithwaite brandishing his rubber tubing as teacher, and of course, French with "Snakeyes".

Finally, H.B.D. was glad to leave Keighley and after university, taught at Sale G.S. and Hinde House Comprehensive before coming to K.E.S. He enjoys Sheffield mainly because of the amount of greenery, especially trees, so near and even in the city centre, unlike Manchester, which he still hates. Indeed he is very concerned about pollution and our attempts to overcome it. In many ways he puts it down to a lack of visual awareness in the English and regrets the lack of an artistic education at an early age here.

This was just one of the varied reasons why he finally decided to be a teacher. One of the greatest evils of the present system is the lack of imagination and as there is very little more important than the next generation, the alternatives seem less of a challenge. At university, he remembers the most able man he knew there went off to eventually sell sticky tape. So, as marketing steel ingots or dog biscuits held no interest, H.B.D. turned to helping a younger generation.

"Herbie" is also a great traveller. He has walked from Cologne to Zurich in his youth and has also hiked among his favourite Alps which he found stimulated his imagination by its very alien character. However, he does confess to a liking for the Perche area of Normandy. Why? Because of its individuality.

He admires George Braques most because of this quality and also because of his simplicity which H.B.D. has always tried to emulate. Thereby he finds that riches would indeed be an embarrassment and a temptation he is dubious about. But if he could withstand its lure, the life as a country gentleman in the Tyrol region of Austria seems most attractive.

Not surprisingly, he has found it frequently hard to conform and regrets that teaching needs a subjection of one's character to its disciplines. When asked what quality he most admired, however, he did not find time for flair or the more "flashy" attributes. His advice to any youngster is to persevere. Many people he knows have not had the enormous advantage of brilliant native intelligence yet have made the grade through sheer hard work. There is no "magic" in the world and as long as one holds fast to one's beliefs, satisfaction is never far away. One belief H.B.D. has held on to is that the supernatural must not be dismissed. Ever since his acquaintance with a poacher in Sutton-in-Craven without legs or substance, his doubts about the existence of ghosts have somewhat decreased!

NIGEL WOOD

WRITERS' CLUB has this year been an institution which has been a melting pit for new ideas and innovations, and also has seen great inconsistencies of attendance ranging from five (including three teachers) to more than forty, at Percy Pringle's group's musical recital in the L.L.R.

This has led to the formation of the Writers' Club Committee, to decide on a definite policy for the society. Apart from the usual functions of the Club, the committee is currently thinking in terms of grand experiments, such as spontaneous dramatics - this is all part of the new dynamic image of the Club, which lamentably few people from outside the hard-core of members seem to have noticed.

Writings of various descriptions continue to provide amusement, disgust and food for thought, many fruitful discussions having lasted until five past two, brought to a close only by the call of sixth period.

Meetings of the Club remain amongst the most regular in the school, and are a source of boundless pleasure for a growing number of people on Monday lunchtimes.

Simon Baggott.

The Art Society, a nebulous body of like-minded individuals, exists on a mostly informal basis through the efforts of several stalwarts of the department. Most lunchtimes see something produced, and much that is worthwhile owes its origin to that indigestive hour.

S. Robinson, whilst keeping us amused with his production line of school-life parodies has largely shouldered the responsibility of advertising this magazine with his screenprinted posters.

Our star of stage, screen, and Radio Sheffield, K. S. Ruttle, put on an excellent one man exhibition of oil painting in the Dining Hall during April. Averaging a painting a week since last October his output has been so prodigious that it has only been possible to stage a representative display.

We did quite well in the 1972 Exhibition of Children's Art held at the Graves Gallery in March. Ian Joynes, 2nd Prize 15-17 yrs. and David Slater, 1st Prize 12-14 yrs. both deserve our congratulations. David in particular has had the distinction of having his work retained by the Gallery for its schools loan service. Other work by Neil Dunbar, Paul McFarlane, Rosemary Johnson, Robert Matthews, Roslyn Neal, John Nash, and Kathleen Worrall was on show.

Lastly, to all the volunteers who have helped in so many ways towards the school plays, painting sets, designing programmes, and notices far parents evenings and concerts, etc, etc,     many thanks.

P.O.J.

 

 

 k

DREAMS

Dreams rise then fall dying
Slowly away
like
the wind that blows and
is gone.

David Henry 4X

THE PIN

Pointed spear
Silver gleaming
Weapons of the minute
Lying on the battlefield
A relic of a recent battle.

David Pearson 1 (1)

SHANTY

Let's get together and sail our ship away,
Yo, ho, ho, and sail her away,
Out on the ocean where the mermaids stay,
Yo, ho, ho, where the mermaids stay.

Let's get together and we'll go by the weather,
Yo, ho, ho, and we'll go by the weather,
We'll be sailing on the seas light as a feather,
Yo, ho, ho, as light as a feather.

Sailing along on the ocean blue,
Yo, ho, ho, on the ocean blue,
You can come too, there's plenty to do,
Yo, ho, ho, there's plenty to do.

Out on the ocean, sailing on the seas,
Yo, ho, ho, sailing on the seas,
See the choppy ocean and feel the cool breeze
Yo, ho, ho, and feel the cool breeze.

Sandra Crisp 2T

AFTER THE CULTURAL REVOLUTION

Look at you!
You're only forty
and you've got your long hair
and your beads!
You sit there,
or rather slouch there
smoking your guts out
and playing your guitar.
Must you listen to those noisy records
and wear those clothes?
Dad! This is 1990!
Why can't you be like other dads
and listen to Tchaikovsky, like us?
Carol's dad tries,

but you!

You're so ...... so old fashioned!

Martin Archer 4E

GOURMET'S DELIGHT

I know that in towns throughout France
They boast fine chefs by the score
And the smell of Hungarian Goulash
Makes you hunger still for more.
You can travel the whole world over,
Sample delicacies so rare
Like Chicken Chow Mien from China,
But nothing that can compare
With a delicious vinegary aroma
That makes you lick your lips,
That's known the whole world over
As English Fish and Chips.

Hurrah for you, English Fish Fryer,
Backbone of the British Empire!

Mandy Bradford 3W

 

A BOY I KNOW

At break he sits on the window sill
Looking into space.
He eats his apple
And his health biscuits.

His fair hair and short sideboards,
His cackling laugh
Make people laugh themselves
And people sometimes tease him.

I pretend
To turn him into a frog
And he picks up his books
And hides behind them.

Steven Knight 2P

23

 

ISLAND OF THE WINDS

Attempting to follow in the wake of highly successful past productions and the difficulties presented by a school on split sites, would deter many experienced producers, but Mr. Shenstone met and overcame these problems and must be congratulated on giving such splendid entertainment in his first attempt at stage direction.

Graham Fellows impressed with his sustained performance in the key role of Marco, the romantic hero, eventually successful in winning the suitably blonde and beautiful Princess Graziella (Jayne Thorpe).

Much of the audience's plentiful amusement was provided by the gloomiest character - Depression No. 3 - exquisitely acted by Julia Lee. Her timing and stage presence showed genuine promise.

Jonathan Jones was clearly the audience's favourite as the diminutive, timid wizard, Nadir. This was a charming cameo part, delightfully -acted. Trevor Bell's East Wind was splendidly belligerent but in the play's dramatic climax he met his match in the regal Sally Fellows (North Wind), cleverly made up to overawe her rival.

Impressive sound effects and imaginative props and costumes combined to round off a very enjoyable evening's entertainment. "Island of the Winds" ranks as a worthy successor in the tradition of excellent Junior Plays at King Edward VII School.

IN WHICH OUR HERO CREATES DEATH

 

The day my great aunt died
I was six or perhaps seven and
All the world was a playground
And my bed was a mystery
Land where orange juice
From the welfare clinic grew on
Trees and the stakes were
Measured in
Ribena.

But my aunt had died and my
Father came in and told me and I
Thought I should cry or perhaps
Show my grief in some suitable
Way.

A few days later as I was
Coming home from Wolf Cubs
(As they were then called)
I created death and the first
Seeds of fear began to
Sprout in my mind together
With the cabbages in my
Grandfather's garden.

Michael Szpakowski 4E

OLD AGE

I had thought old age
Was a happy summer evening,
With the western sky on fire
And little drops of gold
Seeping through the trees.
A little, thatched cottage,
In a dell of green and brown,
An oak-timbered tavern
And happy laughter.

It is not.
It is a wet pavement
And a dirty terraced row,
A damp, stinking room
And a newspapered floor,
A bench by a telephone-box,
And standing blue veins,
A half-heard threat,
And a fear of the end.

David Jardine-Smith 5X

DRIFTING

Drifting,
Clinging, to a beachcombers anyday find;
Salt-crust face and desert throat.
Swollen body
Wrinkled like toes and fingers, in a bath too long.

But the sea,
Tired with its toy,
Swells and lashes
Luck to the beachcomber,
And you to one last, proud moment. Then, sucked down,

Down,

Down,

And the holes in your face
Stretch and fill, till,
Taut agony
Slackens into limp death.

David Seal 8BC

 

ANACONDA

It glides through water or on land
With precious jewels engraved on its back.
The colour merging.
You pick it up but it
Writhes through your hands.
All that's left is the slime
Dripping from your body,
The evil face watching you
With wide eyes and a wide mouth
Like a dangling rope, soggy and slimy.

T. Peake 2Y

THE WORM

A dew drop
Radiant and dazzling in its beauty,
A worm
Slimy and skulking in its repulsiveness.
Together under the morning sun.

Together?

No; you move, slithering across the sodden grass
Rounded body, wet and dirty.
I lift my foot,
You stop.
I lower my foot, You die,
A squashed mass on the lawn.
I leave you, heavy with my murdering heart,
Yet I do not repent my sin.

A dew drop
Radiant and dazzling in its beauty,
A worm
Mangled and disembowelled in its deathbed,
Together under the morning sun.

Lindsay Morris 3E

 

 

 

THERE'S NO GRAVITY!

I was sitting at my desk writing away, acting like an angel as usual, when I began to feel queer. My arms shot out into the air and I could not pull them back. Then. my legs went and I shot out of my desk. I was flying - or was I floating?

"Down, sit down".

"I can't, sir", I said.

"You can and you will because you're missing all my lesson".

 "Oh, I don't mind", I said, feeling happy.

"Go down to Mr. Ruding and tell him I sent you - at once!"

"Don't you mean 'float out'?"

"Oh, get out!"

"Yes sir", I said.           

"Goodbye everyone", and I floated casually out of the door. I then decided to play truant so out of the door I floated and down to Ranmoor.

I was lying on my back when I felt queer again and I began to fall - down - down. Guess where I landed - right on the church spire.

So if you're ever by Ranmoor Church, please HELP     

Dawn Cass 2Q

 

 

THE PHYSICISTS

Courageously departing from tradition, Messrs. Winder and Ferretti presented a powerful production of a modern play by a Swiss author. In these days of growing concern over pollution and the possibility of a scientific Armageddon, it captured the rapt attention of the audience. Moving as it does through a vein of satirical, black humour with attacks on psychiatry, the police, the church and many other aspects of society, it deals a moral knockout which was especially well staged.

The central figure in the play is Mobius - the scientist who has entered the madhouse escaping from a vicious world in order to protect it from itself. Nigel Wood gave a superb rendering of this many-faceted role. His feigned madness, his resolution in driving his family away, the pathetic determination in his rejection and destruction of Nurse Monika, the passion he put into the struggle to win over his fellow scientists and his ultimate despair after apparent triumph, all delighted the audience.

Durrenmatt's most difficult roles fall to ladies. The tremendous exigencies of the part of Fraulein Doktor von Zahnd were ably met by Margaret Lawson. We were inspired by the versatility of this young actress. Her skilful portrayal of the ageing, decadent though apparently benign aristocratic psychiatrist lulled our suspicions. Splendidly she evoked sympathy in offering Frau Rose charity for her erstwhile husband; her grief at the third murder, "my best nurse. I loved her like a daughter", convinced us she was plunged into despair. How great was our surprise in the second act when the mask was flung aside and Margaret forcefully revealed the magnitude of this character's deviousness, viciousness and rapacity. It was an outstanding achievement though Margaret's powerful portrayal of this terrifying freak was to the detriment of her voice. It was remarkable how far she succeeded in assuming the appearance of this terrifying monster.

Mark Bell and Paul Grover faced similar difficulties through the dual nature of their roles. Mark Bell excelled as a foppish Sir Isaac Newton, being perhaps slightly less comfortable in effecting the transition into a modern secret agent; but the show down with Eisler (formerly Ernesti alias Einstein) was conducted in an amusing burlesque fashion. Paul Grover gave an excellent performance as a convincingly German-Jewish Einstein. He is to be commended for mastering at such short notice a part which depended on his transforming himself into a suave, cynical minion of a thinly disguised totalitarian regime.

Elizabeth Cowen did will as the love-sick nurse Monika Stettler, though the part would have allowed her to be slightly more gushing; Jeanette Fletcher gave a moving interpretation of the down-trodden little woman, contrite over her divorce of Mobius but sincere in her desire to follow her new missionary husband, played by Andrew Spencer who reduced the audience to fits of laughter with his superb display of idiotic pedantry. Chris Litherland as the Police Inspector was inescapably concerned with cigars and brandy. The sons of Mobius were most effective in their reactions to their father's insanity. Their contribution to the humour would have been more effective had they been more strictly Teutonic in dress and mannerisms. The guards were novel and howlingly satirical. The set, lighting, costumes and make-up were proof of what talented people can achieve even when working in far from ideal conditions.

authoritative, if

28

 

photo: D. Fellows

Congratulations to all concerned in this fine production; may we have many more of this quality,

H.B.D.

29

30

 

ORIENTEERING REPORT

This is a relatively new sport which has only recently been taken up by members of the school. In spite of our initial ignorance of the sport, we have had remarkable success with teams and individuals gaining first place honours. Special reference must be made to S.A. Dutfield who among other honours has won the Richmond Castle 900 Trophy. P. G. Daykin was also third in the East Midlands Schools event and A. F. Thomson has also gained individual honours. The club wishes to thank Mr. J.C. Allen who introduced us to the sport and has also done much of the work involved in arranging events for us.

The club consists of :­

S.A. Dutfield, A.F. Thomson, R.C. Thomson, J.C. Allen, P.G. Daykin, C. Watson (Sec.), S. Manterfield, D.A. Sykes, P. Jones, A. Belton, D. Little, A. Little, R.G. Hunt, M.D. Willey, (.Rotherham, M.J. Eddowes.

END OF AN ERA

It was on March 26th, 1972 that sixty one years of trolleybus operation in Great Britain ended, in the same city where it started, Bradford. Two days earlier the last day of public operation of trolleys had ended on route 7 City to Thornton. The following day, four special trips had been held to tour the entire system.

The final day saw two special trips starting at 9.30 from the city centre. Following the trolleys were preserved vehicles from as far apart as Bournemouth and Sunderland.

At three o'clock the specially decorated last trolley, 844, made a full tour of the city with the Lord Mayor and official guests on board. It was escorted by a police car and about fifty private vehicles. When the trolley arrived at Thornbury depot, it was greeted by about a thousand people. As 844 turned into the depot for the last time, police and officials placed barriers across the entrance to prevent people entering. After a while a few people were allowed into the depot to hear the Lord Mayor and other officials make the final speeches, and to see the Lord Mayor switch off the power.

So after sixty one years of trolley bus operation, the trolley bus in Britain is now dead.

John Giles
Charlie Nelson

HISTORY SOCIETY 1971

Arising out of interest shown by the Sixth Form in the Spring Term, a nucleus was formed and the Society blossomed anew. Lectures, four in all, were arranged. Attendances rose, reaching the dizzy heights of eighty pupils and two staff for Mr. Hemming's talk on "Sheffield in the 1920's". A coach-tour took thirty members and Mr. & Mrs. Ayres to Burghley House and Lincoln, taking in the architecture of Stamford. Sights seen ranged from 700 Old Masters, through turtle-heads to a spot of ... Evensong, in the watery gloom of the Cathedral.

In the summer an expedition was despatched to darkest Wiltshire (see under "Dig '71"). Enough historical fervour remained for a local sortie to one of Sheffield's more obscure industrial complexes, Wilson's Sharrow Snuff Mills. After viewing the various processes, eleven members emerged' bearing a small box of "Best S.P. Snuff" and their handkerchiefs, the heady atmosphere making their eyes stream. Another success was Mr. L. D. Harris' slide lecture, on "Elizabethan Ships and Seadogs" - Room 8, resembled the lower decks of a stinking galley, such was the attendance! My thanks are due to Robert Holmes, for his audacious publicity, Max Willey, for being my alter ego and Mr. Stittle, for his constant encouragement.

E. Mark Bell.

 

THE FLY

I'm the fly
Attracted by the odour of sweat On your face.
You do not like me,
You squirt the contents of unpleasant
Aerosol cans at me
You hate my monotonous tone.
A million images of you
Strike at me with rolled up copies of
The Glasgow Herald.

Buzz, Buzz,
I'm the fly
Attracted by the odour of sweat
On your face.

Roger Gilbert 4E

32

 

33

k

 

CA

35

GORNFIT

Drawlbrawler mosey over
Pause
(A lawman lines a doorway)
Cityslicker flicks a whiskey
Brawldrawler's shouldered roundly

Flashaglancer slicky-citter
Pause

(A lawman's loaded barrel)
Droolyercooler drawlerbrawler
(Keepaneyeout)
Pause
(Please lawman)

Quicka cityslicker's clicker
Drawerlerbrawler's louder powder

Sickagutup, sickly slickly

(And a lawman fires a brawler)
Drapeyer entrails, droopydrawler
Pause.

David Smith 8MS

EPILOGUE

Our Father,
Who was in heaven
Hallowed was thy name.
The Kingdom came,
Thy will was done in Earth
As it was in heaven.
Thou gavest to us war and death,
But forgave us not our wrongs,
As we forgave not, others who wronged us.
Thou ledst us into temptation and we succumbed.
Thou deliverest us not from evil,
For thine was an evil kingdom
And thine was the power and glory in it,
As it nevermore shall be.

Amen

(So be it)

David Henry 4X

HEROES

Life is fought by sacred men
Who'd rather be elsewhere ... .
Or somewhere,
Who walk alone lest the willing
Find out by simplicity;
And fear is worth it?
An endurance tried and true
Has its own satisfaction.

Life is fought by angry men
Who'd rather believe in something else ....
Or something,
Who cannot accept love
Or show it;
And anger is worth it?
An acceptance tried and true
Has its own futility.

Life is fought by hurt men
Who'd rather believe in someone else ....
Or someone,
Who are nice and hate no-one;
And innocence is worth it?
A tenderness tried and true
Has its own insight
And a man tried and true
Has his own emptiness
Has his own despair
That too much life kills.

Nigel Wood

 

36

 

KESTIONNAIRE

Photos: E. G. Chadwick

'How about a questionnaire for the Lower School' someone suggested at the Kesmag meeting. 'Great' was the universal response. Had we realised just what we were letting ourselves in for, we might not have been quite so enthusiastic.

Questionnaires were distributed to the entire Lower School, and we received about 480 completed answer sheets. With ten questions on each, this amounted to almost 5000 answers to be analysed. Nevertheless, with much appreciated help from Jean Nelson and Mark Gore, we managed it. Results below.

Q.1      Which football team, if any, do you support?

A predictable answer to this one, although the margin was not as great as might have been expected. Sheffield United came first, with 202 votes, followed by Wednesday with 155. Perhaps more revealing is the fact that United and Wednesday had almost equal support among the boys, but among the girls United led by a factor of 2:1 - perhaps an indication of United's greater star appeal. Also mentioned were Chelsea and Leeds. 31 of the participants said they supported no team.

Q.2      Which is your favourite pop singer or group?

Again predictable, T. Rex sweeping the poll, with the New Seekers a long way back in second place. Here, for your edification, the KES top-ten.

1.

T. Rex

102

6.

No favourite

15

2.

New Seekers

56

7.

Deep purple

13

3.

Gilbert O'Sullivan

20

8.

Elvis

12

4.

Slade

19

9.

Led Zeppelin

8

 

David Cassidy

19

10.

Faces

7

Clearly a victory for Bopper Bolan and Bubblegum - although among the 47 groups mentioned virtually every taste in music was represented. Choices ranged from Chelsea Football Team, through Michael Jackson, Cliff Richard, Cilla Black, 4 Tops, Supremes, to Lindisfarne, Curved Air, Yes, Pink Floyd and Jimi Hendrix. The day of the Beatles seems over, however - they collected only two votes

 

 

37

Q.3      Which is your favourite television programme?

This question produced a list which would have astonished even the television authorities. Top of the list came Match of the Day. although with its support almost entirely among boys. Top of the Pops and Steptoe had more general appeal.

Top Ten

1.

Match of the day

68

6.

Monty Python

23

2.

Top of the Pops

48

7.

Bless this House

20

3.

Steptoe and Son

32

8.

The Liver Birds

13

 

Tom and Jerry

32

 

Appointment with Fear

13

5.

Alias Smith & Jones ...

28

10.

Benny Hill Show

10

Q.4      How much T.V. on average do you watch each night?

Stand up the 84 children with square eyes! Or perhaps sore eyes might be more apt - this number claiming to watch 5 hours, or more - some simply writing 'all night'. However, thankfully for the eyesight and homework of the lower school, the majority 60% - watch between 1 and 3 hours per night, with the biggest single group, 15%, watching 2 hours. Congratulations also to the 16 children who watch 1/2 hour or less.

 

 

I

Q.5      What time do you go to bed?

This produced some interesting and revealing statistics, as will be seen from the accompanying histogram. The peak for bedtime become later as the year is higher. But in fact, 2/3rds of the Lower School is in bed by ten o'clock. The girls appeared to appreciate the value of beauty sleep more than the boys - girls comprising only one quarter of those going to bed after 11 o'clock. The other major fact revealed is that bed-time at weekends is often up to 2 hours later than during the week - the latest time recorded being 2 a.m.

 

 

Q.6      How much pocket money do you get?

At first sight, this question might be expected to give financial nightmares to parents - almost 10% of the sample getting £1 or more. However in most of these cases the money appears to be intended to cover clothing and all expenses, or in others included money earned on paper rounds. Of those in the 0 - 80p bracket, which is probably 'pocket' money, there is a slight rise over the years, with 60% of the sample getting 30 - 50p per week. One interesting revelation of the survey - the number of people still working in £.s.d. Not only were many of the amounts in £.s.d. 'round figures' - 25p, 371/2p, 50p - but they were frequently written down in £.s.d. Congratulations, Lord Fiske!

38

 

Q.7      If you could change one item of school uniform, which item would it be?

To satisfy the whole lower school, it would apparently be necessary to change the entire uniform. But by far the most unpopular items were the blouse and shirt. Among the girls, 82 would like to change the blouse, and 106 boys would like to change the shirt (with a heavy write in vote for Ben Shermans). For the girls, the skirt (66) was the next most unpopular - with many preferring to wear trousers. Next came the coat (24) and the tights (15). After the shirt, most boys disliked the blazer (62), followed by the tie (34) and the trousers (18).

Q.8

Would you like to be a prefect?

Rumours of the perks attached to being a prefect would not appear to have percolated to Darwin Lane. Only 145 of the participants (32%) answered Yes. By a very slight margin the girls seem to be rather more aware of the advantages of power than the boys.

Q.9      Should games be optional?

'Yes' was the answer of 286 (62%) of the participants - perhaps not such a large proportion as we might have expected. However the state of some of the answer papers would appear to suggest than some of them were uncertain as to how to answer. Only one person wrote anything apart from 'yes' or 'no' - a blunt demand to 'Ban cross-country'.

Q10 Which person do you most admire?

This should go down in the annals of Kesmag as 'The Question we ought never to have asked' - not so much due to the type of answers as to the sheer number of them. We received almost as many names as there were answer papers. There seemed to be some doubt as to how to interpret the question - many of the girls, and some of the boys taking it as 'Who do you most fancy?' As a result the girls listed such names as :- Pete Dual (7), George Best (6), Ben Murphy (5), and Mick Jagger, and the boys :- Raquel Welch (5) - usually spelt Rakol Walsh; or Varushka (2).

Among those who answered the question more aptly, sports-stars - Tony Currie, Nobby Stiles, Pele, Henry Cooper, Harvey Smith, Yvonne Goolagong - or T.V. personalities - Wilfred Brambell, Robert Dougal, Morecambe and Wise figured prominently. On a rather higher plane, Einstein, Douglas Bader, Princess Anne, and Ludwig van Beethoven also appeared. Members of staff also received a vote of confidence - Mr. Ruding, Mrs. Ward, Mr. Powell, Mr. Davies. But it was good to see that, for some at least, home remained the source of inspiration - 9 participants nominated Mum and Dad, one My Grandad and one - My Dog.

 

 

 

 

A puzzle for your edification.

2

 

 

Some photographs taken from unusual angles at both buildings of the school. Can you recognise them? If not, see page 75

4         5

 

6              7

 

 

 

Photos: Brian Marshall Edited by Simon Baggott

 

WHAT CHRISTMAS IS

Christmas is crowds in city streets
False goodwill and salesmen's treats,
Presents that we can't afford
And cracker jokes that leave us bored.

Christmas is old folk alone in flats -
Not for them turkey or fancy hats,
Pushing and shoving on buses too full;
Don't think of the homeless - that's too dull.

Washing up after Christmas dinners,
Don't go to church, that's for sinners.
And after Christmas is all done
We wait for next year, more games, more fun.

Carmel Rose    2X

"Did you know I'm engaged to an Irish lad?" "Oh, really?"

"No, O'Reilly!"

Overheard:       'All those staying for dinner put their hands up. No, we'll do it another way; all those not staying for dinner keep their hands down.'

 

r

 

 

42

A TRIBUTE TO KES CHESS            

Why is there a Junior Schools Chess League except for the pleasure of indoor mental activity? It cannot be because of the stimulating competition between the schools, because for a number of years, and one or two more to come I hope, the Junior Schools Chess League Champions have virtually been announced before the season has started. That's right, you've guessed it; King Edward VII always sweeps the board with the two teams coming first and second.

Not only do we have the best Sheffield school teams but when the best of the two teams are put together, the first team have been Yorkshire Schools Champions for three consecutive years, although with the departure of valuable members of that team it now seems doubtful whether next year will be the fourth.

These are not the only achievements of KES chess teams. A year or two ago the first team not only won the Yorkshire Schools Jamboree but went on to the semi-finals of the 'Sunday Times' knockout Competition and thus proved themselves one of the best school teams in England.

If this record is not something for the school to be proud of then I can't think what more needs to be done. I am sure that we aren't sufficiently aware of the achievements of our Chess Teams.

B. Wardle 4X

 

'However, the results or this experiment cannot be taken as accurate, because the weights fell off three times, the string fell off five times and the whole apparatus fell over once'. (Physics Exercise Book).

43

i

AUTUMN

Brown leaves crackle,
The sun, - very faint
A cool breeze blowing
Through the empty trees.

The wet grass glistens.
Smoke from Autumn fires)
The sun filtered -
On acorns strewn among the leaves.

The fresh smell of country-side
Goldens, chestnuts, browns,
All colours of Autumn
Light the shortening days.

Long shadows fall,
The bare trees shiver and shake
The cold, icy Autumn night
Falls.

Laura Chadwick 2P

 

NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY

Our society has been very active this year, more so than many others. In the first four months of our existence, we had more than twenty meetings. These are divided up into one indoor and one outdoor meeting per week, and are usually attended by a faithful core of members. However, the field meetings seem to have the greater following.

At least two of our meetings started from Lodge Moor, and more ended there. The other places where we have been let loose are quite varied including, Rivelin, Clumber, Killamarsh, Flamborough and Bradfield. The main activity of the society is watching "dickups" (birds), but interest among the members is more varied - mammals, mosses and plants. The spirit of the meetings is added to by our familiar rotund friend, "Debbie". An example of his humour: "If this bxxxxx rain goes on much longer, we'll be growing tadpoles in the bxxxxx binoculars!"

Finally we would like to thank Mr. Holdford, and Mr. Finch for submitting to the perils of transporting us and to S.T. Elliott and N.H. Brown for renewing the activities of the society after an          interval of six years.

James Singleton, Simon Elliott.

 

44

 

I

THUNDERSTORM

A flash of lightning
Like street lamps coming on,
A roll of thunder
Gone.
All of a sudden rain
Like the raging torrent of Niagara
Hitting a blank sheet of stainless steel
It bounces down like a tennis ball
Hitting its racquet
Then calms down a little,
But then again the lightning
Lighting up the midnight sky,
Followed by the ear-bursting thunder.
I can think only of the poor creatures
Out in this terrifying storm.

Catherine Cowen 2Z

WET!

The morning was so wet
That it was spitting
Down with force
Like lightning.

The morning was so wet
That it was like the shock
Of diving into the sea
In mid-winter.

The morning was so wet
That it was like a waterfall
Beating the rocks
With deadly force.

Duncan Munro 1(1)

From the Geography Dept:

'This City is well described as an unending bungaloid excrescence.'

 

45

THE SCHOOL BUS.

What school bus? You may very well ask that. But, believe it or not, King Edward VII School, Sheffield has been the proud owner of a school bus since October, 1971. At least, some of us have been proud owners; those of us who know about it, that is.

You may have seen it, on a rain-soaked and windswept winter morning, standing forlornly in the shelter of the shed next to the garage. It can't stand in the garage because it is far too big to get through the tiny doors - a masterpiece of planning.

It is a Commer, Two Ton, two and a half litre personnel carrier, with a four cylinder petrol engine. That much is certain. Apparently, little else is. There are even basic doubts about its age. Mr. Finch, who led its lengthy renovation, told us confidently that it was made ('created' perhaps?) in 1960; however, Mr. Hemming emphatically stated that it is of November, 1963 vintage.

It was in Mr. Finch's own words, "Mr. Hemming's brainchild" (passing the buck, perhaps?) and Mr. Hemming refers to it tactfully as an experiment.

It came 'at a very reasonable cost' from the Welfare Services Fleet, at their depot on Gayton Road and Mr. Hemming specifically asked that we extend our grateful thanks, which, of course we do, even though we are somewhat sceptical about the chances of anyone at Welfare Services reading 'Kes mag', zippy magazine that it is, or claims to be. They also supplied us with a spare engine; someone, somewhere is really optimistic about it, we can tell. It was used there as a personnel carrier (predictably) and was mainly used for carrying O.A.P's., until it was put on the transfer list and was signed by K.E.S. for a moderate fee. Welfare Services have been extremely helpful and have supplied servicing and spares.

The bus came to the school to fulfil a dual purpose. Firstly it is used to transport small parties - and is available for any 'sound school purpose' - and secondly as a vehicle for training projects, for aspiring K.E.S. mechanics. The slight problem of the garage entrance was not mentioned.

New seats have been put in by the Craft Department, and since it came to school 4N have been bringing it up to scratch. We easily believed that it needed a lot of work doing on it but what we found slightly less credible was that it passed the M.O.T. test three weeks before half-term. The Minister must have had an off day.

46

 

 

 

 

No one is quite sure what the fuel consumption is, apart from the fact that it does consume fuel, because concerning this problem have only just been sorted out. Mr. Finch guessed at 18 - 22 m.p.g. He also guessed that it would be able to reach the dizzy speed of 50 m.p.h.

All this conjecture results from the fact that it has not, as yet, been fully tested. No one even knows how many it will carry, although that number is probably fourteen. But it has a big airy body (an imitation of a wind tunnel, perhaps?) and it is capacious and roomy    for what?

Its various drivers, and anyone over the ripe old age of twenty five with a CLEAN licence may drive it, say that its engine and gearbox are good but the steering is heavy. "Maybe a little too heavy for the ladies on the staff." So much for Women's Lib. You will doubtless have noticed that we do not mention who, on our illustrious staff, does not qualify for the second condition. We found our way strangely blocked. Maybe some enterprising person would like to carry out a survey for the next Kes mag?

As we have already mentioned it is available for any legitimate school purpose. To date it has carried games' teams and societies, a fell-walking party and will take a party sailing on the Broads at Easter (might do better as a boat). The orienteering team has already used it (thought they were supposed to run).

So that is the school bus. Mr. Finch believes that 'A better vehicle than this is wanted in this school'. It is said that Rowlinson has a brand new Ford Transit, centrally heated, with automatic transmission, synchromesh gearbox and gold plated hub caps.

Back to reality: "Maybe", said Mr. Hemming, "if the people who use it and find it a benefit, were sufficiently interested to wash it and clean it out leave it as they'd like to find it

11

What School Bus?

5X D. Jardine Smith D. Parnell

I

47

 

A SPLASH OF OIL

The tanker has been and left its mark,
A ring of colour in the wet road.
Red for danger
Green for go
A circular rainbow
Richard Of York Gains Battle In Vain
You can see them all
Over and over again
Until they disappear.

Wendy Hardcastle 1

SHE WILL NEVER BE FORGOTTEN          

She sat there on a stool looking out of the window, thinking. Her name was Elizabeth. She was thinking of the past. The doorbell had rung only a few minutes ago and her mother and father had answered the door, as they knew who it would be. Elizabeth's mother was weeping and was very upset because she knew it was going to happen sometime.

The visitor was their family doctor who had come to tell them the sad news. Elizabeth had not gone downstairs but had listened from the landing. She knew it would happen some day but she couldn't bring herself to believe it somehow.

Elizabeth had a sister called Marrietta. She was fourteen, two years older than Elizabeth. They had always been very close to each other. When Marrietta was born the doctors said that she would only live until she was about twelve as she had a hole in the heart and nothing could be done about it. He could have phoned only their phone happened to be out of order.

When she heard, Elizabeth ran up to her room. She didn't cry because her mother had alway told her that when Marrietta died she did not want Elizabeth to be upset about it because it just could not be helped. Marrietta was never told of the illness. She had always been a happy child and had cared a lot about Elizabeth. She had to be taken to the hospital every month but she never guessed anything because her mother pretended that Elizabeth had to go also and she would take Elizabeth with her to the hospital and the doctors examined both of them.

As Elizabeth sat on the stool looking out of the window, she thought of all the happy times she had had with her sister, but now they were all over, she was gone. Elizabeth's mother promised that when Marrietta died she would not be forgotten, and that was the way Elizabeth wanted it. She gazed around her sister's bedroom; photographs and belongings were still in her bedroom and Elizabeth wanted them to stay just as they were, for always, so that Marrietta would never be forgotten.

Angela Kehaya 3Y

48

The beach is like the palm of a hand, rough and deserted with not a soul in sight. I feel like a second Crusoe all alone with the sun beating down on my back. This beach seems to go on like a desert. My only friend is the sea which seems to carry whispers along its foaming waves.

The sandy beach is almost white and lifeless. It is waiting for colour to be put into it. I feel I have been on the beach for so long that it belongs to me. The lifeless feeling, the air around, everything I feel is mine.

In the night the air changes. It is cold and the beach wakes up. The voices of everyone who has been on the beach speak; all the voices are soft, all blend in, but I know I only imagine it. It's being alone on this lonely beach that does it.

The sun rises early like a ghost coming into a desert town with bits of withered bushes blowing along the sand.

Sonia Wilson 3A

 

THREE HAIKU

The stag leaps high.

The fish swim-deep.

On a wilted desert tree

Below on the ground

Cool at the bottom of the lake,

The vulture perched

The leaves whistle past

Heat above the water

As the sun sank beneath the dunes.

Robert Matthews 2Y

'Bernard of Clairveaux, founder of the Cistercian order, and inventor of the St. Bernard dog '

(Architecture essay)

49

 

One … Two … Three … GO!

Mrs. Langsley, the head of girls games, was most reluctant to be interviewed, but Kesmag insisted she must not be allowed to hide her many lights under a bushel.

Born and bred in Sheffield, Mrs. Langsley attended Marlcliffe Junior and High Storrs schools. Her sporting career began when she-was still at school when she played hockey for S. Yorkshire juniors. Whilst at school she also played, besides all the more conventional games, ladies cricket, at which she was a good all-rounder, or as she put it with customary modesty, "general dogs-body". She did not continue in the game however, after leaving school, when she found the game was actually taken seriously. What was lost to the cricket-field, however, was gained by the hockey pitch, for Mrs. Langsley was chosen to represent Yorkshire at hockey.

Among her hobbies, Mrs. Langsley lists climbing and her husband is also an expert climber. Both are very fond of the Swiss Alps, to such an extent that they were married at Grindlewald, a small Swiss village where they had both climbed often. In doing so, they surmounted with true mountaineering determination, the tremendous obstacles posed by Swiss law, Foreign Office red tape, the language and preparing for the wedding in the middle of a field where they were camping, in pouring rain. All the red tape and preliminaries took so long that only four days of honeymoon were possible on the mountainside. Mrs. Langsley described the wedding as "one of those wild ideas that came off".

She no longer has much time for climbing and says she has become quite domesticated. In the time that is left her from her heavy school commitments, she enjoys cooking and music, being able to play both the piano and cello.

Mrs. Langsley has no ambitions for the future, although when younger she hoped to play hockey on an international level. She enjoys the work she is doing now; being involved with young people, and teaching subjects which interest her most, particularly gymnastics and modern dance.

Mark Gore

50

'The Welland Canal was built because it was unprofitable to sail ships over the Niagara Falls'.

(Geography Exam.)

AUTUMN 1971: LAKE DISTRICT TRIP

The autumn invasion of the Lake District by a coachload of Fell-walking club stalwarts provoked the usual complaints about the weather and blisters. Having sampled the continental delights of down quilts at Mereside Youth Hostel the three senior groups parted company, following a carefully devised itinerary avoiding the official school party at Grasmere and then Coniston. John Lindley, Brian Nuttall and Stewart Dutfield spent two nights in Eskdale Hostel, separated by an eventful and very wet surmounting of Scafell.

Via Bowfell and the Langdale Pikes, from which we made a seventeen minute descent to the bus stop - is this a record? - we re-encountered our friends from Mereside in Elterwater Youth Hostel. The following day we discovered that the school party had spent some time being blown and washed off the tops too.    

Stewart Dutfield.

Facing the cold rock, legs trembling,
As onto microscopic bulges I cling.
My life merely a question mark in time.
A puzzle to be solved,
As fingers weaken, aching muscles wither,
And clockwork time is ticking away.
Until soon it will stop.
Flesh and bones, warm blood
Transplanted to the cold black print
Of an obituary.
And time, time is ticking on,
My life, my existence, my very soul
Is contained in that patch of crumbling rock
Staring, ready to shrug me off.
I must move, or fall
As a fragment of stone spinning downwards.
The mainspring of time is weakening.
Quaking, I reach upwards
Fingers clasping into eternity.
But Eternity is infinite!
I Plunge!
Tick, Tock, Ti ….. ?
Paul Rollinson 5X

51

52

KESMUSIC

KESMUSIC has failed to meet the KESMAG deadline for several issues, so we take a look at the scene as it adapts (or fails to adapt) to the changing structure and atmosphere of the school.

For the Concert we field an Orchestra of about seventy whose figures: 13 fiddles, 4 violas, 6'celli, 1 Bass (but five in training), 7 flutes! 2 oboes, 2 bassoons, 11 clarinets! 7 horns! 10 trumpets! 2 trombones plus percussion, show perhaps a certain imbalance. It is fed by the labours of ten peripatetic teachers training some sixty players. Some departments flourish, others show a disappointing drop-out or irregularity rate.

Most heavily affected by the split-site conditions is the Choral Society, most of whose top practice perforce at the junior school, while the 'men' sing topless (as it were) at the senior school. (Nor is the conductor's ulcer improved as he worries it will all add up in performance). The Madrigal Group has weathered conditions quite well. The Girls' Choir which built up well in its second year of existence has fluctuated rather in numbers as other activities have exerted their pull, but it goes into the Concert over sixty-strong and in good heart. A generous tribute is due to the nucleus of zealous and regular week-by-week singers and players, and to the mini-bus and car drivers who ensure that the right people get to the right school at the right time.

Large guitar groups at both schools flourished for the one term when a visiting teacher was available, but Miss Hirst was first in the field here and has continued to lavish her time and enthusiasm to great effect in this area. Gratitude, too, is due to Mrs. Smith for her work with recorder players.

We are fortunate to have a number of very talented musicians, and it is perhaps not realised that they are also active in Sheffield music generally. All cannot be mentioned, but a number of local societies have had the benefit, for instance, of Paul Webster's varied talents, and he is to be congratulated on becoming an Associate of the Royal College of Organists a year ago, winning the prize for the best performance to boot.

During the Easter holiday the Junior School reverberated to the sound of the British Youth Symphony Orchestra, here on a week's course. Towards the end of it we thought Andrew Barlow, now at Keble, looked a little worn from playing the trombone for seven hours a day - but this is an orchestra to be recommended to the really proficient player.

In all the tribulations of 'reorganisation' Mr. Law has toiled manfully and we wish him every success in his new field as Head of Music at Silverdale where they are actually taking steps to accommodate music, and where, under one roof, his split-site schizophrenia should begin to heal.

NJB

4th Year Biology answer: "Foresters plant trees because they knead the prophets."

'From Exeter we go to Heeley   : (Essay on Gothic Cathedrals)

CHRISTIAN FORUM

Open meetings have provided a real forum for both Christian and non-Christian. Discussions, including "Justice", "Christianity, Capitalism and Communism", have rarely been successful in finding conclusions, and not always successful in attracting large numbers, but have generally been found worthwhile in stimulating an exchange of view, Andrew Spencer provoked interesting discussion with his talk on the relationship of theology to science and nihilism, but on a more down-to-earth level we also enjoyed memorable talks on the subject of race relations by Deaconess Madge Saunders and the Revd. Wellington Gaba from South Africa, and on the subject of the probation service by Mr. W. R. Brookes. Another side of our activity is represented by Bible Studies, and while it attracted only a small nucleus, this has recently enjoyed an injection of new blood. A new venture this year is the visit to "Godspell" the Christian rock musical in London. This has aroused much interest, and, we hope, points to a lively future for the Christian Forum.

G. B. White.

It was not the same,
A second-time-round
Obligation to emulate,
To re-capture a past climax.
This fact finds one slowly,
As you pause on the
Climb up the mossed hill,
Perfect in somehow-synthetic sunshine,
As you stop involuntarily
On the black-tar track and
The conversation stops
Gradually,
Remember when ....
The best thing was when ....
And somehow the present
Just doesn't claim relevance
In this homage to the passed­
By, known safety
Of the unchangeable.

Nigel Wood

APART

And what is trust
And what is time
What are words
False words of men?

We live apart,
Each man apart
And what was mine - now is yours
For property is only need.

And my time is the clock,
But on your journey
You are travelling other roads
And your time simply circumstance.

So I'm not hurt;
This is more bare - more true
To kiss without a country,
Cross without identity.

Margaret Young

54

 

You search to find the one,
Who's one with you .
To look in someone's eyes  
And see yourself,
As they see you.
But is that really what you want?
To lose identity?
A blink will fracture that communion,  
So shut your eyes  
And finish it.  

David Seal 8B  

SAUSAGE, EGG, CHIPS, BEANS, BEANS, BEANS AND BEANS.

Easter saw the 270 - mile tour of pubs and cafes known as the Pennine Way under­taken by two 8th-form maniacs. They camped at Edale on the first night and, of course, it rained. The following night was spent at Edale Youth Hostel, two miles further from Scotland! After Stewart's Cordon Bleu risotto for supper and. beans for breakfast, our thirty-five pounds were lightened by jettisoning a copy of "South with Scott", which we hoped we would not need.

Two days later the intrepid adventurers reached Mankinholes, near Todmorden, after walking twenty three miles from Crowden, in weather too foggy for us to see the M.62 from the footbridge. With John (Annapurna) Lindley's feet patched up we continued through Bronteland to Earby where we crossed swords with an 80 year old foul-tempered h ....hiker (dirty-word), together with representatives from the population of Bocton, the R.A.F., and the Chesterfield teaching profession, who were with us all the way to Scotland. Malham was reached a week after starting, at an average of eleven miles per day.

Having recovered from the previous day's exertions, Pen-y-Ghent was surmounted on the way to sausage, egg, chips, and beans, by now traditional, in the cafe at Horton. The Pennine Way book there now boasts both illustrious signatures. Via barns, bed and breakfasts, hotels and hostelries - the Tan Hill Inn is the highest pub in England - we battled on to Hadrian's Wall, where after a twenty seven miles trudge from Alston we reached the two star Twice Brewed Inn, too late for evening meal but early enough to pay for extortionately expensive B. and B. This was compensated for by a free stay in a "Five-star" barn, complete with straw bales and sheep, on the Cheviots, twenty miles from the end at Kirk Yetholm. After a free pint in the Border Hotel, we spent the final evening in "The Plough" in Town Yetholm, whose Geordie landlord plied us with sausage, egg, chips and beans once again.

It took sixteen days to walk the Pennine Way and five and a half hours to drive home.

Stewart Dutfield, John Lindley.

KESQUIZ

Here follows a PRIZE QUIZ open to any pupil in years 1, 2, and 3 at King Edward VII School. Entry is free. Competitors must answer the twenty questions and complete the limerick of - which four of the five lines are provided. Entries must be handed in to any member of the English staff as soon as possible. The latest date on which entries can be accepted is Monday July 3rd. Please mark all entries clearly with your NAME and FORM. No competitor may submit more than one entry.

There will be one prize of a £1 RECORD TOKEN. The winner will be the competitor who in the judges' opinion has submitted the most correct answers, In the event of there being more th one entry with the highest number of correct answers, the winner will be the competitor who has completed the limerick to the greatest entertainment of the judges. The judge's decision is final.

THE QUESTIONS:

1.

In the British Royal coat-of-arms, the two supporting figures are a lion and a unicorn. If the lion represents England, what does the unicorn represent?

2.

Which Association Football League Club has the nickname 'Peeping-Toms'?

3.

What, in inches, is the diameter of the Hale reflector telescope at Mount Palomar, reputedly largest in the world?

4.

What was the original title of W. H. Ainsworth's book which was re-issed under the name of 'The Bold Highwayman - Dick Turpin'?

5.

The cricketing body called the 'Marylebone Cricket Club' only received that name in 1787, when it was remodelled. What was its previous name?

6.

When was the British Broadcasting Corporation established?

7.

By what name was the educational institution, now called King Edward VII School, known in 1903?

8.

Who, in Greek legend, ran the 200 miles from Marathon to Sparta within 48 hours?

9.

What is the chemical, whose formula is MgSO47H20, more commonly called?

10.

In what year were the Olympic Games held in Amsterdam?

11.

Which organisation, whose symbol was a lamp of Maintenance, had objects which could be summed up by these four dicta: "To think fairly; to love widely; to witness humbly; to build bravely'?

12.

What was the route of the first passenger railway in the world?

13.

Which composer wrote the St. Matthew and St. John Passions, and the B minor Mass during twenty seven years which he spent at Leipzig?

14.

Which writer used the pen-name Mark Twain?

15.

What was the world population estimated at in 1971? Was it (a) 728m; (b) 1,102m; (c) 2,608m; (d) 3,041 m; (e) 3,350m; or (f) 3,897m. ?

16.

What is the family name of the counts of the House of Flanders?

17.

What is the name of Derby County Football Club's home ground?

18.

Who is the lead guitarist in the popular rock group Led Zeppelin?

19.

Who discovered the element Radium?

20.

What substance has the alternative name 'plumbago'?

THE LIMERICK:       

While reading my Kesmag one night,
A power-cut turned out the light;
As I sat in the dark
I was heard to remark:

…………………

 

Easy Kesword
S. D. Baggott

Solution and notes on Page 75

 

ACROSS

   

DOWN

 

1.

Of pairs: compasses.

(3)

1.

Of pairs - animals

(3)

2.

Verb.

(2)

2.

Reduce to lower state.

(6)

4.

Mineral paste.

(5)

3.

Add nothing to 14 across singular female counterpart, and get a sign.

(4)

7.

Substantial study.

(9)

4.

White fluid.

(4)

11.

Jam or record.

(5)

5.

No need for a big walk if you have a car

(2)

12.

Where buildings have the inclination.

(4)

6.

Initially a female, but in fact a classic man.

(3)

14.

Plural and counterpart, take nothing away from 3 down.

(5)

7.

Lump of earth.

(4)

15.

THE CANE, or Maggie's boyfriend.

(3)

8

Bad actor comes from a pig.

(3)

16.

March scares for Roman leader.

(4)

9.

Present Participle heard at some annual function as 22 across.

(9)

17.

2nd unknown quantity.

(1)

10.

Vessel

(5)

18.

We have one but, it has no feathers.

(5)

13.

Charged atom.

(3)

20.

Egyptian river.

(4)

14.

Teacher makes the clock go.

(6)

22.

Past participle heard at some annual school function as 9 down.

(3)

17.

Penultimate letter.

(1)

23.

Disc Jockey.

(3)

18.

Bubbles of air on surface of effervescent liquid.

(4)

24.

Raised platform.

(4)

19.

Schools open ground?

(5)

27.

Singular cereal.

(3)

21.

Stretch out on a large beast.

(4)

28.

Similar to Monty.

(3)

22.

He who teaches Chaucer is deemed by him mad.

(4)

30.

The dismal science.

(9)

25.

Biblical parts of a play.

(4)

32.

Possible cause of hunger.

(2,6)

26.

21/2 masted sailing vessel comes in flakes

(4)

34.

Employ, treat, or a purpose.

(3)

29.

With atmosphere.

(4)

35.

New one at Glossop Road, useless to a bird.

(4)

31.

Ban the bomb

(3)

36.

24 hours.

(3)

33.

Preposition.

(2)

 

ACROSS

   

DOWN

1

Ant-eater - a foreign description of school life?

(8)

1

Contiguous adjustment to a coin.

5

Nevertheless he wasn't trained by them!

(6)

2

As a result of this, a comer might give advice.

10

These ropes ensure that the Classics department is not reduced.

(9)

3

Did she use it to light her fire?

11

Military cap which is almost cylindrical

(5)

4

This clue needs solving in Berkshire.

12

Commentary shortly before break.

(5)

6

Confused - so bitter about midwifery

13

Habituation is a mixture in men.

(9)

7

Destroy, decapitate and destroy again!

14

Wanting even the reverse - from Mr.Bell

(7)

8

Mr. Sutton has a name that is proud.

16

Add to contents of deck.

(6)

9

... so he's sure to give confidence!

19

Sacred part in temple.

(6)

15

He manages to fix his mind upon a page of the Bible

21

Careers man gives sound advice to safe owner

(7)

17

Oily Liquids brought to a recess, possibly

23

Randle in a muddle. Must be due to this hormone!

(9)

18

Trusted, perhaps, with a body height.

25

Beginning of moon-set.

(5)

20

A scientist, holding a small quantity of lithium, shows ill-will.

26

Cassava - sounds like a woodpecker.

(5)

21

This is not Arvicola amphibius, and is therefore not a pirate.

27

This bee bores a mathematician.

(9)

22

Ron takes the old king - to court?

28

Scottish harbours where there are again places with fixed fishing-nets.

(6)

24

Stocks - of ginger, according to Shakespeare.

29

Emphasised that final courses are on their way back

(8)

25

Does Ringrose look cross with Daisy?

58

WORD-LADDER

One of the characteristic and inevitable evils of term-time is the demon home-work. A brief respite from this is occasionally gained for poor, hard-working school students, during those revered and blessed days known as 'half-term'.

0 joy! if we could change a wicked school institution into a pleasant one! This can be done, but, alas in words only:

Change HOME WORK to HALF TERM in any number of changes of one letter in each word, providing that the number of stages for each word is the SAME.

The two words in each intermediate stage need not, of course, make sense.

There are naturally several ways of doing this, but just to show it can be done, one possible solution is printed on page 78

UNDER 15 FOOTBALL

The season was one in which some excellent results were achieved, but in which a few games were disappointingly lost. The nucleus of the side remained constant. Sentance proved a reliable but bad-tempered goalkeeper. Hudson, Cowley and Morgan played soundly at the back, and Henry of the mazy runs played at right back - occasionally. The team was well served in mid field by Charlesworth, Tindall, Aplin and Webster whose hair, at least, was reminiscent of Charlie George. Percy, Stacey and the sly Mayor scored the goals, and Rogers and Grainger were faithful reserves.

The team played well enough to get into Europe, but succumbed in both games on Belgian soil. However, they did put the Under 14's in their place on a unforgettable day at Blankenburge Stadium.

Played 24         Won 11            Lost 9  Drawn 4

FIRST XV RUGBY 1971/72

A nucleus of players remained from the previous season, and very early on in the season it became apparent that the flair and enthusiasm of the previous season were still there. The somewhat happy-go-lucky attitude, perhaps the result of easy wins early on in the season, was shattered by a sound defeat at the hands of a good side. From then on a more organised and better disciplined side appeared.

A.M. Hall and D. Plews scored 35 and 34 tries respectively. Indeed everyone who played regularly scored, and the team's ability to cover saved them after one or two disastrous defensive lapses. Under Howarth's leadership this was generally a happy side that provided some entertaining rugby.

Our best wishes go with Mr. I.L. Reid who left at Christmas after having raised the standard of first XV rugby quite dramatically over the past few years. Thanks are also due to Mr. J. Booth and Mr. P. Knowles for their attention and encouragement, and to M.J. Harrison for his work as secretary.

P. 27 W. 25 D. 0 Pts. for 918 Pts. ag 139

This season the team won the Chesterfield VII's competition.

   
   
   
   
   
   
   

Photo Philip Smith

 

;Jane Simm=;

UNDER 15 RUGBY XV

P

W

D

L

F

A

14

4

2

8

15

217

Despite the addition of two new players, McCabe and Wallis, this has not been a very successful season for the U 15's. But this has not been because of a lack of good players.

Seven players were selected for the Sheffield team and three for the South Yorkshire Squad. The forwards have played well together, with a lot of good hooking from Simnett. Blackburn's kicking has been very good, being the top scorer with 42 points. The very fast backs have tackled well through-out the season. The best game was perhaps at Danum, where we won 24 - 4 with a really good team performance.

The team reached the final of the Sheffield 15 a-side knock-out Cup, but were beaten by Ashleigh.

In the Tigers' 9 a-side Aston Woodhouse beat us in the preliminary round after a very exciting game which ended in a 'sudden death' play-off. Winning the Losers' Competition was some consolation.

Team selected from :­

Addis, Blackburn, Bramwell, Butler, Capener, Evans, Henty, Joel, McCabe, Napier, Parr, Perks, Reynolds, Rhodes, Simnett, Smith, Tallent, Wallis, Warren (Capt.).

U.13 RUGBY

The U.13 team started badly by losing to Maltby twice but they soon made up for this by beating Jordanthorpe 24 - 0 and Adwick 30 - 0. After a streak of bad luck they finished the season by losing only one match out of eight. During this run they defeated their greatest rivals, Tapton 22-6. Other games were won by greater margins but this was the score which gave most pleasure.

RECORD: Played 17, Won 9, Lost 7, Drawn 1, Points for 241, Points against 178

Team from :- Hayes, Sutherland, Jordan, Titchener, Butler, Culver, Lindsay, P. Jackson, Stanley, Pearson, Markham, Johnson, Fellowes, Shaddock, Hoyland, Jones, Hudson, Hutchinson, R. Jackson.

U14 RUGBY

This was a particularly disappointing season for the U14 team since a large number of fixtures had to be cancelled. This was due mainly to the fact that with so few players to call on resources were always stretched and when, in addition to a savage crop of injuries several players began to lose interest it became virtually impossible to field a team. It was particularly disappointing that this occurred at a time when, with Shaw and Buff in adding strength to the backs the team as a whole was beginning to play well and almost achieved a notable victory over Maltby. Ashley and Hornby provided a solid second row while Gillatt, Burr and Wilson all played well at times. The forwards, however, tended to be slow in loose play and the backs with the exception of Shaw lacked any real thrust.

FIRST XV RUGBY 1970/71

This season produced a team that broke all previous records through a combination of individual talent and teamwork. Under the able captaincy of Lavender, the team scored more and conceded fewer points than ever before. On the whole the side won its games by determined forward play and continually throwing the ball around. The team's performance spiralled as victories brought sufficient enthusiasm for people to go to training sessions, and the ensuing fitness was a leading factor in later victories. The morale of the team and the attitude of the players must in part at least, account for their success.

Thanks are due to D.M. Lupton for his work as secretary and to Mr. I.L. Reid for all his efforts for the team.

P.29, W.27, D.0 Pts. for 775 Pts. ag. 97

The side were runners-up in the Buxton VII's Competition, reached the final of the Chesterfield School VII's, and the semi-final of the Sheffield Tigers Club VII's competitions.

BADMINTON REPORT 1971-72

The badminton team enjoyed a mixed season, winning four games and losing five. The highlight of the season was the defeat of Abbeydale. Abbeydale did not make the same mistake twice, sending a stronger team for the return.

Of the team, Matthews and Harlow were a strong consistent pair, if slightly unorthodox, Higgins and Fieldhouse always entertained with their non-stop repartee, and Higginbotham and Gore's persistent habit of running into each other always baffled their opponents. Lindley and Charlesworth were a reliable third pair, with Edey as a second reserve. We owe a lot to Mr. Paice for his coaching, despite his habit of doing his typing during a game!!

J. Higginbotham (Sec.)

1971/72 FOOTBALL REPORT

For the 1st XI 1971/72 was an excellent season. Resultswise the 1971/72 season was not as good as 1970/71. Of the twenty-four matches played six were lost, however three of these were to Falcons, the Old Edwardians and the Staff. At the end of the season the 1st XI reached final of the Yorkshire Sevens competition, only to lose on penalties after extra-time, to Adwick, had been beaten earlier in the season in an 11-a-side match.

The team played consistently throughout the season, under the able leadership of Smith S.P. The games that were lost, were all by the odd goal, and in only one of the three did the 1st Xl field a full strength side but the reserves called upon to replace the established players did not let side down.

Again the majority of the goals came from Seal and Smith D.A., although Smith left before the end of the season. The 1st XI also lost Gilbert at Christmas, who was always a tower of strength in the defence.

The team was well organised throughout the season and our thanks go to the captain, Smith, the ever-faithful reserves and to Mr. Davies who gave up so much of his time for games and training.

SECOND X1 FOOTBALL 1971/72 After a poor start to the season with only two wins out of the first six games, the team settled down to an excellent run of twelve matches which was only ended at Grimsby when the team had only ten men, of which six were reserves. Once again the team was affected by injuries, and after Christmas by the loss of players to the first eleven. The best displays were against Myers Grove first XI, Rotherham, Mexborough, Aston Woodhouse, the Old Edwardians, and particularly against Manchester and Ecclesfield.

Leading scorers were Lavender, and Roebuck, and after their departure at Christmas the forwards showed no inclination to score any goals. The midfield was ably held by O'Brien, Ibbotson and Kersh, and despite having five different goalkeepers the defence was strong all season.

P.23, W.13, D.3, L.7 Pts.for 61 Ag.48.

Leading scorers:

Lavender 16, Roebuck 11, Turner 9, O'Brien

J. L. Collier.

The school would like to thank J.L. Collier for his services as captain over the past two years.

A.G.J.

U13 SOCCER

Last season was a good one for us. We lost only one match, going down 2-3 to Abbeydale. On the other hand we managed to beat De la Salle 13-0. Laine was our top scorer with 43 goals and he also achieved the individual scoring record with six goals against De la Salle and High Storrs. Grundy and Lewis were the only two players to play in the full 20 matches.

RECORD: Played 20, Won 12, Drawn 7, Lost 1; Goals for 82, Goals against 38

Team selected from: Mellor, Sweet, Nicholson, Cooper, Grundy, Shankley, Lewis, Peckett, Moghul, Winslow, Laine, Thompson, Lester, Bottamly, Williams, Pashley, Beecroft, Johnson, Wilcock, Campbell, Kerr.

FOOTBALL UNDER-13 (1970/71) UNDER-14 (1971/72)

This team has enjoyed a good deal of success over the past two seasons scoring over one hundred goals in each of the two seasons, and winning thirty four of the fifty one games played. As well as some games which have resulted in runaway victories, this year's 16-0 against High Storrs being the highest score, there have been a good number of close games and in particular the fixtures with Wheatley Hills, Ashleigh, Abbeydale and Wickersley High, have produced much good football.

The prime strength of the side has been its ability to score goals regularly, and in this respect Broomhead, Palmer, and Prince have been most successful. Julian Smith, in midfield and Fraser Smith, first at centre half and latterly in midfield, have given many powerful performances and have scored a number of useful goals., while Woodhouse and Johnson, in defence and midfield respectively, have shown a good deal of skill. In defence Austin and Murray Spencer, and more recently Guest and Murray have made useful contributions, while Ramsey has developed into a very competent goalkeeper.

During the Easter holidays the team enjoyed a short tour in Belgium.

The team has been selected from: Reaney, Murray, Guest, Spencer, Woodhouse, Austin, F.Smith (Capt.), Johnson, J.Smith, Prince, Palmer, Broomhead, Llewellyn, Russell, Heaton, Rose, Wells and Percy.

D.M.M.

FIRST ELEVEN FOOTBALL 1970/71

This season marked the most successful record ever achieved by the senior school's soccer squad. The side lost only one match throughout the season. They won the Yorkshire Sevens Competition without conceding a goal. Smith S.P., Jepson, and Barrott represented Yorkshire, and Smith D. and Seal each scored over forty goals, Smith equalling the school record of forty-four goals.

Behind these bare individual statistics, however, lies the story of a team success, a team in which every regular member, including the goal keeper Waistnidge scored, and in which most players played in more than one position.

Waistnidge's handling and great ability contributed much to a strong defence in which Smith T.A., Macfarlane, Gilbert and Barrott appeared to be for the most part, impregnable.

In mid-field Jepson the captain, Smith S.P., Dabbs and Straker were as hard in the tackle as most defences, and their flair for the unconventional as well as the effectively orthodox set up a constant flow of chances. The majority of these were gratefully accepted by Seal and Smith, a partnership which could fairly be said to be the team's greatest weapon.

Exley, until he, unfortunately, severely injured his knee in February, completed the team.

Noble, Roebuck, Scriven and Mann made telling contributions to the success of the team, and Codd, Deakin, Ford, Moore and Kay also appeared.

Many thanks are due to Messrs. Hemming, Jinks and Davies for their valuable training, coaching and supervision which was much appreciated by all the team.

P. 37 W.33 D.3 L.1 F 137 A 30

SCHOOL CRICKET 1st XI 1971

The team's final record indicates that it did not achieve the success that was promised by its balance on paper and by its performances in May. Although three of the defeats were the hands of non-school teams, the confidence of the early-order batting and the penetration of the quicker bowlers somehow disappeared in the cold and inactivity of a relatively wet June, and were not fully recaptured for the stiffer programme at the end of term. Most regrettable was that the rot set in when all four matches were lost on an otherwise successful Whit tour of the North Riding.

Yet most of the cricket played was of a high quality by the standards of recent years; The fielding was particularly good, with outstanding examples set by Barrott and Rusby in the outfield and by D. A. Smith close to the wicket. Gilbert and Smith gave several lessons in running between the wickets, while behind them Waistnidge's keeping was gradually transformed from an almost embarrassing clumsiness to a cheerful reliability.

The captaincy, too, deserves special mention. Chantry, already burdened with major  batting and bowling roles, played his cards close to his chest. Smith, his deputy and "senior professional", never stopped thinking about the game, and his persistent prodding of his captain was almost an entertainment in itself. It is much to their credit that only two out of nineteen games were drawn.

The injury suffered by Higginbottom when bowling against the Old Boys proved a serious handicap, as his pace and accuracy were major factors in the early victories. Neverthe­less, he maintained excellent control of line and length for the rest of the season. Most of the other bowling was shared by the two left-handers, Chantry opening from over the wicket, and Barrott at slow-medium from "round the corner". Barrott, in his third year in the XI, was still unduly diffident and often needed several overs to find a steady length: against a much vaunted Staff XI he took 5 for 18 in 17 overs. His batting covered a whole gamut of styles, but sometimes made refreshingly straight use of the long handle. Of the two acknowledged all-rounders, Rusby had few opportunities to develop his off-spin, while Exley failed to adapt his in-swingers to the damper wickets.

The batting eventually proved too brittle against genuine pace, and was handicapped by Gilbert and Mann losing their form at the same time. While Mann remained difficult to shift, in the later matches too much was left to Smith's concentration and quick reflexes. The tail was typically inconsistent: in one game the last five wickets all fell at 158, while in five others they doubled the score. On these latter occasions Chantry frequently held the fort at one end and it is perhaps his extra touch of class, especially against tight bowling in low-scoring situations, that one remembers most from so enjoyable a season.

RESULTS:

Played 19

Won 7

Drew 2

Lost 10

2nd X1

Anyone whose idea of cricket is the sight of eleven trusty white-flanneled hearts of oak flitting o'er the greensward has obviously never played for a 2nd XI school cricket team. Before you jump to the conclusion that we were all simple, naive amateurs, let me confirm it. It was not unusual to see nine fielders slipping over a Whiteley Woods mudpatch (the other two having assumed it was an afternoon match and the reserve having lost his way).

Therefore, if you learned that we managed three drawn matches out of thee seven fixtures played (four lost), you may not be unduly surprised. What would be more surprising is the fact that we fielded eleven players on four consecutive occasions. In this context results and statistics lose their lustre and meaning - except perhaps with Mick Warwick, who was a real embarrassment to us. He often was so boringly brilliant (he finished top of both the bowling and batting averages) and just as often helped a genuinely bemused captain set, in all the best and most obvious positions, his field.

At least we enjoyed our cricket. Next season, quite a few of the players will be glad of the experience obtained. Andy Slack's batting improved immensely, Henry Hudson and Dick Jeavons proved themselves as reliable, if not venomous, opening batsmen, and Nigel Allsop, spinning deliveries like a master born to the art, will be remembered at Oakwood School. "Gret" Greatorex and Ian Turner's fielding plus their swiping - sorry, batting soon established them as the team's irregulars.

Martin Turner alone proved a model of consistency, Phil Holt alone proved to be the only one who could spot the difference between the cross ply and radial tread of a "Wag-Tea", Stu Palmer alone could pitch the ball like an accurate medium-pacer should, a pity we discovered he was a spinner, and then there's Neil Ibbotson.. What would carry us all through a somewhat duller Winter Sports' season would be, not a slow action replay of "Masood" Jeavons' run-up, but another look at the face that was achieved by the six foot tall fast bowler from Myers Grove when little Neil hit one of his "specials" back over his head for four.

We would like to thank Mark Gilbert and Dave Smith, exiles from the 1st XI, for their guest appearances. A decision about your audition will be made later.

Most of all we would like to thank Mr. Meredith for his helpfulness and good humour. Rumour has it that he still has enough sanity for next year's team.

N. P. Wood

UNDER 13

The under-13 team played only six matches last season and lost only five. We won against Batley G.S. by five wickets. The highest score was sixty three against Oakwood School, Rotherham. Overall the team's performance in the field was very good, but it was the batting which let us down. Murray and Gascoyne, the captain headed the batting averages.

The team consisted of: Bronks, Guest, Gascoyne, Murray, Howe, Holmes, Hardy, Palmer, Fletcher, Wilson M. and Wilson J.

UNDER-14 CRICKET 1971

The team for most of the season, struggled to attain any consistency. The bare record of one win and three draws speaks for itself. The win against Ecclesfield was the last match of the season and augurs well for the future.

No-one failed to realise the importance of serious practise, and our thanks go to Mr. Vickerman for his help and encouragement in this and all things.

The team was chosen from the following: Aplin, Stacey, Mayor, Crabbe, Charlesworth, Blake, Dean, Manterfield, Nohavika, Rawling, Rogers, Sentance, Monaghan, Parr.

SENIOR CROSS-COUNTRY TEAM

The 1971/2 cross-country season was one of some depth in the senior team. For many races we were able to enter two complete teams. As a result of this enthusiasm we won the Sheffield Schools Championship and the Schools League. We also came third in the North Midlands Championship.

The following senior team - members have represented Sheffield: Dutfield, Reynolds, Willey, Hunt and Thomson. The school team also included Watson (a most conscientious secretary), Taylor, Daykin, Weldon, Speight, Pollard, Eddowes, Lindley, Hudson and Harris.

Next year's captain will be D.M. Willey.

The inter-house championship was won convincingly by Sorby. The individual champion was G. Reynolds.

Stewart Dutfield.

UNDER 15 CROSS COUNTRY

The team enjoyed a very successful season winning all but one of their nineteen races. This success was due to good running by Lynch, Stacey, Smith P.D., Mann, Manterfield, Little Auger and Kilpatrick, thought on many occasions contributions by Wardle, Peake, Rawling, Lister, Boshier, Hopkinson and Solway won many races. Thanks go to Mr. Chapman and Mr. Allan for the time they gave up to help make our season such an enjoyable - and profitable one.

UNDER 14 CROSS COUNTRY

The under 14 team's performance on the whole was pleasing, fifth in the Sheffield League and eighteenth in the North of England Schools Championships. It was not until late in the season that performances by individuals improved. Manterfield, Stacey, Smith, Little, Lynch, Maud and Lister made up first team, but generally the 16 strong squad ran with enthusiasm and grit that any school would have: been proud of. Stacey was selected to run for Sheffield on two occasions, and was a member of the Sheffield Team which took the Yorkshire title.

UNDER 13 CROSS COUNTRY

The younger runners had a poor season. The lack of training was very noticeable. Nevertheless, good running by Holgood, Weston; and Orton helped the team win four of their nine races. With training, performances will improve tremendously, and perhaps, next season will be more rewarding.

BOY'S HOCKEY XI

To say that the ball has not run for us this season would be a gross understatement. After losing our first match of the season to Chesterfield we lost our goalkeeper, Birks, due to a cracked hip joint inflicted in the following match against Huddersfield.

Despite regular Monday evening practices and the arrival of Healey (a former Hampshire player) there was no apparent improvement in the results.

Harrison stood in for Birks to play with great enthusiasm in goal. Amery proved a reliable fullback, Hedley was supported by Stockwell and Skinner in the half back line.

The forward line comprising - Breese, Ibbotson, Laing, Peach and Ruttle, seemed on occasions reluctant to fight hard enough to cover the ball. They were however, unlucky not to score more frequently.

Our thanks to Mr. Ringrose for his invaluable support despite illness, to Holmes for refereeing during his absence and latterly Mr. Thomson.

J.W.T.

I am very grateful to Tomlinson who has acted as secretary this year and who on the field has proved a most reliable Captain and a much improved player.

JR.

SCHOOL SWIMMING & WATERPOLO

K.E.S. Swimming Team            95 pts.

Manchester Grammar School    132 pts.

K.E.S. 9           M.G.S. 0

Waterpolo Match -Sheffield University 5 K.E.S.           7

K.E.S. Team -

Ford MJ. Brown NH. Munro ATD. Robins A. Turner I. Gravestock A. Willey DM. Greaterex I. Marshall N.

Swimming Match -

KES team of U.14, U 15 and U 16 lost to Chesterfield.

K.E.S.  57

Chesterfield      116

INTERNAL COMPETITIONS

Senior Waterpolo League :- 6th, 7th, 8th form teams.

WINNERS - 7th FORM TEAM

House - League Waterpolo -MONTGOMERY House - Waterpolo Knockout - MONTGOMERY

The season's results seem to indicate an interest and success at Waterpolo yet they reflect a lack of speed training prior to swimming matches. The interhouse waterpolo matches attracted much interest and were a great success and the senior waterpolo matches afforded invaluable training and competition. Thanks go to Mr. Davis who devoted much time to refereeing waterpolo matches last term, and encouraging training, and congratulations go to C.J. Twelves, P.J.L. Smith, D. Henry, The Schools Swimming Assoc. Breaststroke Team Race Champions. The Freestyle Team were second in this competition.

N.E.B.

Dear Sir,

Would you please excuse Eric from P.E. and games this week owing to a nasty mark on his hip.

1971 INTER-HOUSE ATHLETICS CHAMPIONSHIPS RESULTS

FIELD EVENTS

EVENT

 

WINNER

HOUSE

Time/Distance

Rounders Ball

Jun. G.

C. Gosney

CL

E

162'R. '

Javelin 

Junior B.

F. Smith

WL

99'1"

 

Inter G.

M. Douglas

CH

64'9"

 

Inter B.

D. Henry

A

88'9"

 

Senior G.

S. Blow

A

 
 

Senior B.

I. Turner

SH

121'10"­

Discus 

Junior B.

F. Smith

WL

77'7"

 

Inter G.

E. Heathcote

CH

65'0"

 

Inter B.

D. Henry

A

88'9"

 

Senior B.

M. Ford

A

111'5%"!

Shot    

Junior B.

F. Smith

WL

38'3'/2"t

 

Junior G.

S. Wilson

WT

27'5%"

 

Inter G.

E. Heathcote

CH

27'8"

 

Inter B.

R. Payton-Greene

H

33'8'/2"

 

Senior B.

M. Ford

AR

38'6"

High Jump

Junior B.

C. Teale

CH

4'3"

 

Junior G.

G. Cooke

CH

4'0"

   

J. Allen

H

 
 

Inter B.

R. Mason

WL

4'10'/2"

 

Inter G.

L. Fearn

 

3'101/2"'

 

Senior B.

M. Ford

A

4'11"

 

Senior G.

E. Cowell

H

4'3"

Long Jump

Junior B.

D. Guest

SH

14'2"

 

Junior G.

S. Moody

SH

13'0"

 

Inter B.

D. Perks

H

16'1"

 

Inter G.

W. Theaker '

L

14'5"

 

Senior B.

E. Exley

SH

19'7%"

 

Senior G.

E. Cowell

H

14'11"

Triple Jump

Inter B.

R. Mason

WL

33'111/2"

 

Senior B.

NO EVENT

   

Pole vault

Inter B.

A, France

CH

7'6"

 

Senior B.

NO EVENT

   

CHAMPION ATHLETES

       
 

Junior Boys

F. Smith

WL

 
 

Junior Girls

G. Cooke

CH

 
 

Inter Boys

P. Stacey

AR

 
   

D. Perks

H

 
 

Inter Girls

W. Theaker

L

 
 

Senior Boys

M. Ford

AR

 
   

E. Exley

SH

 
 

Senior Girls

J. Simm

AR

 
   

E. Cowell

H

 

CHAMPION HOUSE - Final House Positions                                                

1st

Arundel

368 Points

5th

Welbeck

156 points

2nd

Chatsworth

216

6th

Wentworth

150

3rd

Sherwood

198

7th

Lynwood

104 "

4th

Haddon

166

8th

Clumber

46 "

Dear Sir,

I do not wish Alan to climb any heights in P.E. His is subject to a dizzy feeling if he goes up heights, since he has kidney trouble.

GIRLS' GAMES REPORT - 1970-71

This was a busy year for the teams and it brought some very encouraging results. One of the more pleasing features of the year was that over 25% of the girls in the school played for one team or another.

WINTER

Analysis of matches

Played

Won

Drawn

Lost

Under 16 Netball

7

5

0

2

Under 15 Netball

12

9

1

2

Under 14 Netball

1

1

0

0

Under 13 Netball (1st)

19

16

1

2

Under 13 Netball (2nd)

8

6

0

2

Under 12 Netball (1st)

4

1

1

2

Under 12 Netball (2nd)

2

0

0

2

2nd Year Hockey

5

3

0

2

Under 16 Badminton

5

 

0

2

The under 13 netball team had an excellent season which they completed by winning the Sheffield under 13 League Championship, (The Creswick Trophy).

Team:   J. Lewis, S. Moody, J. Hutchinson, D. Turner, G. Littlewood, A. Prince, H. Walford.

The under 15 netball team had an equally pleasing season and they also reached the final of the Sheffield League (Graves Shield). After a very close game, they lost to St. John Fisher by two goals.

Team:   S. Miller, W. Theaker, S. Marsden, M. Douglas, G. Bisby, L. West, A. Hutchinson.

CROSS COUNTRY

This was the first season in which we had entered full teams in both the Juniors and the Intermediate age groups. Their performances were excellent. The Intermediate team competed in eleven fixtures and ended the season as league champions. Jane Simm became the individual champion and was selected to represent Sheffield at the Yorkshire Championships. The Junior team also competed in eleven fixtures and were finally placed fourth (out of twenty-seven teams),

Intermediate team:-       J. Simm, N. Rose, L. Fearn, J. Gonez, S. Carmichael, J. Fletcher.

Junior team: from :-       P. Cooper, D. Cooper, K. Nichols, H. Lawrey, P. Priest, S. Houghton, J. Ellis, J. Williams, S. Wilson, G. Simm, C. Jackson.

The Olympic gymnastics club met regularly throughout the year, and it was upgraded to become a group for the area. Four teams entered the schools annual gymnastics competition in March.

SUMMER

This was another energetic season with the Darwin Lane facilities rarely out of use.

Analysis of matches.

Played

Won

Drawn

Lost

U.16 Rounders team

7

3

0

4

U.13 Rounders team

9

2

3

4

U.12 Rounders team

1

1

0

0

Under 14 Tennis

5

3

0

2

Senior rounders team from :­

C. Brown, M. Douglas, A. Bottom, S. Faulner, J. Bates, G. Kennedy, G. Breasley, J. Gonez, C. Dallas, P. Hinds, S. Marsden, A. Hutchinson.

Junior Rounders team from :­

J. Allen, J. Lewis, K. Stocks, G. Littlewood, S. Wilson, S. Moody, H. Walford, D. Armitage, C. Gooney, J. Medley, G. Sorrella, J. Woodhouse.

Under 14 Tennis from -­

J. Woodhouse, P. Daykin, S. Moody, J. Moulson, J. Wilson, G. Ketteringham, H. Walford, G. Littlewood.

ATHLETICS

Team members worked hard through the season and were well rewarded for their

efforts. As has already been reported, a strong mixed team became City Champions after beating Abbeydale Grange by one point in City Finals. Both Junior and Intermediate girls teams competed in track league fixtures throughout the season, the Intermediate team finishing fifth in the finals of this event (over twenty teams competing).

Junior team:­

S. Wilson, M. Douglas, J. Ellis, S. Andrews, D. Turner, J. Garnett, S. Fellows,

P. Daykin, S. Moody, D. Cooper, L. Chadwick, J. Civil, C. Jackson, C. Gooney, J. Maulson, S. Houghton, P. Cooper, P. Skelton, J. Farley, G. Cooke, S. Marsden, H. Walford, D. Armitage.

Intermediate team :­

W. Theaker, J. Fletcher, J. Gonez, N. Rose, J. Simm, S. Carmichael, L. Fearn, E. Heathcote, S. Blow, K. O'Sullivan, L. West.

Jane Simm and Wendy Theaker were selected to represent Sheffield at the Yorkshire Championships. Jane was fifth in the final of the 400 metres and Wendy was fourth in the long jump.

DANCE GROUP

This met regularly throughout the year and made two appearances - at the school concert and at the lower school dance evening. They were honoured by a visit from three of the dancers of the Ballet Rambert Company. They came to see the groups specially commissioned for the Ballet Rambert during the previous year. This visit was the beginning of a growing relationship with the company.

Group members :­

J. Fieldsend, J. Hutchinson, M. Case, D. French, S. Marsden, G. Seaton, S. Faulkner, H. Osgerley, J. McKay, P. Skelton, S. Ward, C. Gibbs, J. Wardle, A. Mappin, D. Rawson, J. Worrall, S. Morgan, K. Valantine.

 

RFS

1971 ATHLETICS REPORT

1971 must be one of the best seasons the school has ever had. The intermediate boys' team won the track and field league finals, and the school team won the Sheffield Schools athletics championships beating Abbeydale Grange by one point. The intermediate team (boys and girls) were also runners-up in the West District Championships.

In the preliminary group meetings of the track and field league the junior and intermediate boys teams were very consistent, coming first in nearly all their meetings. The intermediate girls team also did well, but the junior girls were not as successful as the other three teams. As a result, the junior and intermediate boys teams, and the intermediate girls team qualified for the Track and Field league finals, at Westfield.

In the finals, the intermediate boys team won their section, the junior boys tear came third and the intermediate girls were unlucky to finish only fifth.

In the District Championships, the intermediate team finished second and the junior team third.

This highly successful season was brought to a close by the school winning the Sheffield Championship. In doing so we had no fewer than five individual winners: P. Stacey (Junior 800m), K. Charlesworth (Junior 80m hurdles), E. Exley (Intermediate Long Jump), M. Ford (Intermediate Discus) and Jane Simm (Intermediate Girls 400m). In addition the intermediate boys relay team (A. Scriven, P. Burkinshaw, M. Ford, E. Exley) won their race in record time.

i

Five members of the school team were selected for Sheffield in the Yorkshire Championships: Jane Simm, Wendy Theaker, E. Exley, R. O'Brien, and P. Stacey. Exley narrowly finished second in the intermediate boys long jump. O'Brien finished tenth in the intermediate 800m. P. Stacey came third in the junior 800m. Jane Simm finished fifth in the intermediate 400m. Wendy Theaker came fourth in the intermediate girls long jump.

1971 INTER-HOUSE ATHLETICS CHAMPIONSHIPS RESULTS

TRACK EVENTS

EVENT

WINNER

HOUSE

Time/Dist

 

First year Boys

L. Williams

SH

12.1

 

First year Girls

L. Chadwick

CH

11.8R

80m

Junior G.

S. Andrews

WL

12.2

100m

Junior B.

A. Buffin

A

14.2

 

Junior G.

S. Andrews

WL

14.9

 

Inter B.

D. Perks

H

13.1

 

Inter G.

W. Theaker

L

14.2

 

Senior B

E. Exley

SH

12.2.R.

200m

Junior B.

A. Buffin

A

28.5

 

Junior G.

D. Turner

WT

31.4

 

Inter B.

D. Perks

H

26.0

 

Inter G.

M. Douglas

CH

30.0

 

Senior B.

E. Exley

SH

24.9. R.

400m

Junior B.

A. Buffin

A

1.11.9.

 

Junior G.

J. Ellis

CH

1.9.0.

 

Inter B.

P. Stacey

A

59.8.R.

 

Inter G.

J. Gonez

H

1.4.8.

 

Senior B.

R. O'Brien

CH

1.0.0.

800m

Junior B.

G. Tichener

WT

2.39.2.

 

Junior G.

A. Prince

A

 
 

Inter B.

P. Stacey

A

2.19.2.

 

Inter G.

J. Gonez

H

2.54.7.

 

Senior B.

R. O'Brien

CH

2.9.3. R.

 

Senior G.

J. Simm

A

2.36.1.

1500m

Junior B.

J. Smith

CH

5.19.5.

 

Inter B.

P. Stacey

A

4.42.1. R.

 

Senior B.

N.A. Marshall

A.

4.43.0.R.

Hurdles

Junior B.

C. Teale

CH

14.3

 

Inter G.

G. Cooke

CH

15.5

 

Inter B.

K. Charlesworth

CH

14.5

 

Inter G.

W. Theaker

L

14.8

Relay

Junior B.

Arundel

 

58.2

 

Junior G.

Chatsworth

 

58.7

 

Inter B.

Arundel

 

52.1.R.

 

Inter G.

Lynwood

 

61.9

 

Senior B.

Sherwood

 

50.3

 

FROM A P.E. DEPARTMENT POSTBAG

Dear Sir,

In view of the continuous east wind it will be inadvisable to allow him to play games....

Dear Mr          

Malcolm was sick with dioreher on Friday        

Dear Mr          

Can John be excused games as I think he has bruised his rib as somebody knocked his head in his chest.

Dear Sir,

Will you please excuse Terry P.T. this week owing to his having a bad neck. He is under the doctor with it.

Dear Sir,

Please may Kenneth be excused from games and P.E. because a cow has stood on his foot and hurt his ankle.

Dear Sir,

Will you excuse John from P.E. and games as the doctor said he must come to school today but not to do P.E. or games as his ring worms are not dead yet, and he has to keep them bandaged up.

TENNIS REPORT

With only Seal, the captain, and Codd the secretary, remaining from the previous year's outstanding team, it was not surprising that only an average season ensued.

After the customary early exit from the Glanville Cup, Brown and Ruttle settled down as the second pair. Early defeats by Manchester Grammar School, Hymers, Hull, Rowlinson, and Roundhay, Leeds, were offset by a good double over Chesterfield and victories over Mount St. Mary and Doncaster.

Gatti, Fitzpatrick and Wille were replaced by Hodgins and Harris as contestants for third pair, but like Brown and Ruttle they suffered from a lack of confidence in their unorthodox ability.

Thanks are offered to Smith and Noble for their successful guest appearances, and particularly to Mr. Anderson who had to persevere with a very temperamental team.

PLAYED 11    WON 5           LOST 6

Second Team: PLAYED 7 WON 2 LOST 5.