KING EDWARD VII SCHOOL MAGAZINE

VOL. XIV.

WINTER, 1955-56

No. 4

CONTENTS

SCHOOL NOTES  

111

FIVES

128

SPEECH DAY    

113

SCOUTING

129

FOUR-FIFTEEN    

115

A CAMBRIDGE LETTER    

130

THE PEREGRINE FALCON    

116

THE CAR   

130

A TRANSATLANTIC ADVENTURE  

117

OXFORD LETTER

131

AWHEEL IN GERMANY

118

OLD EDWARDIANs ASSOCIATION

131

COLOGNE    

119

CROSS-COUNTRY    

132

BELGRADE

120

Football

133

SWITZERLAND    

121

RUGBY    

136

HOSTELLING

121

HOUSE NOTES    

138

PRIVATE ENTERPRISE    

122

We regret that owing to printing difficulties this issue appears very much later than was intended.

26 DAYS AFORE THE MAST

123

MUSIC

124

THE LIBRARY  

124

SCHOOL SOCIETIES  

125

 School Notes

 WE congratulate the following winners of University awards:—

E. M. SPIR, Hastings Scholarship at the Queen's College, Oxford, for Mathematics.
C. M. N. VERE, Hastings Exhibition for Modern History.
J. M. F. GAGAN, Hastings Exhibition for Natural Science.
G. HUMPHRIES, Open Exhibition in Medicine at Pembroke College, Oxford.
A. E. HANWELL, Minor Scholarship in Natural Sciences at Christ's College, Cambridge.
R. CLARKE, Minor Scholarship in Mathematics with Physics at St. John's College, Cambridge.
N. S. WAITE, Brackenbury Scholarship in Modern History at Balliol College, Oxford.
P. LEE, Arthur Sells Exhibition for History at Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge.
N. L. GLASS, Open Scholarship for History at Keble College, Oxford.
D. M. DOWNES, Exhibition for History at Keble College, Oxford.

Places have been awarded to N. G. WELLINGS, at Peterhouse, Cambridge; A. D. P. BRIGGS, at Trinity Hall, Cambridge; A. J. PINION, at Jesus College Cambridge; B. S. BEEVERS, at Wadham College, Oxford; J. L. MADDEN, at Lincoln College, Oxford; K. JACKSON, award of merit in the Hastings examination and a place at the Queen's College, Oxford.

I. W. STRACHAN has been awarded an R.A.F. Flying Scholarship worth about £150. This has enabled him to train to fly light aircraft and he now holds a Private Pilot's licence. He was also chosen for an international exchange visit to U.S.A. last summer.

Herbert Hughes Memorial Spanish Prizes have been awarded to J. H. Bates, A. D. P. Briggs, A. A. Greaves, and G. Nuttall.

I. J. G. Marshall (1940-51) played for Oxford v. Cambridge in the Inter-varsity Soccer match.

The Armistice Day Service was held on November 11th. Dr. J. H. Burdekin and Mr. E. W. Sivil read the Roll of Honour of the First and Second Wars. The Address was given by Mr. S. Credland, an Old Edwardian of 1923-28.

We welcomed during the term the visits of Herr E. Kohl, of the Teachers' Training College, Speyer (Rhineland), who spent a week with us and (as the reports of various school societies will show) took an active part in all our doings; and of Mr. T. Tvedt, Rektor of Tingvoll Statsrealskole (Norway), who found much to interest him in his two days' visit.

The now traditional end-of-term film was again highly appreciated perhaps even more than usual owing to the nasty weather; the hilarious adventures of Genevieve, even without the colour, went down well with all ages.

A highly successful contribution to out-of-school instruction was made by Mr. Helliwell in his illustrated talks on Art to Sixth Forms, given in dinner-hours. These were much enjoyed by large numbers.

A Jubilee Commemoration Service will be held on Wednesday, May 16, at 7.30 p.m. in the Cathedral. The preacher will be the Rev. Canon E. A. BERRISFORD, D.S.O., M.C., an Old Edwardian. He was at school from 1906 to 1910 and a Hastings Exhibitioner in Science at the Queen's College, Oxford. He was in Haddon house, a cross-country runner and a member of the Gymnasium VIII, also Cricket Secretary. At Oxford he was President of the Junior Scientific Society of the University, and President of the O.U.B.C. After serving with distinction in the First War, with the rank of acting Colonel, he returned to the University and was Chaplain of Queen's College from 1920 to 1929, and then became Rector of Bramshott, in the diocese of Plymouth.

Forthcoming events

16 March. Junior Swimming Sports, at 7 p.m. in the School Baths.

20 March. O.E. Association Annual General Meeting.

24, 26, 27 March. School Dramatic Society, Julius Caesar, in the School Hall.

29 March. O. E. Annual Dinner, Maynard Arms Hotel, Grindleford.

2 May. School Concert, at 7.30 p.m. in the Victoria Hall.

12 May. Athletic Sports, at Whiteley Woods.

16 May. Commemoration Service, at 7.30 p.m. in the Cathedral.

6 July. Senior Swimming Sports, at 7.0 p.m. in the School Baths.

 G.C.E., 1955

THE statistical result of our 1955 General Certificate Examination is as follows

In A level: 1 boy passed in 4 subjects; 69 boys in 3 subjects; 21 boys in 2 subjects; 10 boys in 1 subject.

The overall percentage pass was 92.6%. 83 out of 88 presented passed in the General Paper: 45 distinctions were gained and 16 State Scholarships awarded on the results.

In O level: 2 boys passed in 10 subjects; 16 boys in 9 subjects; 10 boys in 8 subjects: 29 boys in 7 subjects; 18 boys in 6 subjects 26 boys in 5 subjects; 26 boys in 4 subjects; 34 boys in 3 subjects; 49 boys in 2 subjects; 31 boys in 1 subject.

These figures include all entrants for odd subjects from Sixth Form and Special Fifth, but are only concerned with entries for O and AO papers, not with O passes on A papers. The overall percentage pass was 76.6%.

HONOURS LIST 1954-55

G. S. ECCLESTONE, Major Scholarship in History, Emmanuel College, Cambridge.
R. F. H. MORTON, Major Scholarship in History and Economics, University College, Oxford.
D. S. TAYLOR, Open Scholarship in Natural Science, Oriel College, Oxford.
M. T. HUTCHINGS, Hastings Scholarship in Natural Science, the Queen's College, Oxford.
K. G. MALLETT, Hastings Scholarship in Natural Science, the Queen's College, Oxford.
C. B. LAYCOCK, Open Scholarship in Geography, St. Edmund Hall, Oxford.
A. M. SUGGATE, Open Exhibition in Classics, Peterhouse, Cambridge.
P. W. LOMAS, Open Exhibition in French and German, St. Catherine's College, Cambridge.
D. P. ALLEN, Arthur Sells Exhibition in Classics, Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge.
M. A. SHARPE, Choral Exhibition, Exeter College, Oxford.
J. S. DOWKER, Entrance Scholarship in Physics, University of Nottingham.
I. D. HARRISON, Co-operative Society Scholarship in French, University of Nottingham.
J. HUTCHINSON, William Warner Scholarship in Civil Engineering, University of Nottingham.
P. WRIGHT, Edgar Allen "B" Scholarship, University of Sheffield.
R. A. MASSEY, Open Major Scholarship for Aeronautical Engineering, University of Southampton.
T. ECCERSLEY, Exhibition in Chemistry, University of Durham.
A. WESTON, Reckitt Scholarship in Geography and Economics, University of Hull.

State Scholarships: P. BENNETT, I. A. F. BRUCE, R. CLARKE, A. F. COOPER, G. K. DICKINSON, D. M. DOWNES, J. M. F. GAGAN, A. E. HANWELL, J. D. HEMINGWAY, J. V. ROOKS, E. M. SPIR, T. THULBOURNE, R. M. TREEBY, C. II. N. VERE, N. S. WAITE, P. WRIGHT.

Speech Day
OCTOBER 25th, 1955

 PROGRAMME

THE SCHOOL SONG

THE HEADMASTER'S REPORT

THE CHAIRMAN OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
(Alderman A. Ballard, C.B.E.)

LATIN ADDRESS OF WELCOME
Spoken by A. J. Pinion

Distribution of Prizes and Address by
SIR STANLEY W. RAWSON, M.A.
Vice-Chairman, John Brown & Co., Ltd.

Vote of Thanks to the Chairman and Sir Stanley W. Rawson,
proposed by the Lord Mayor of Sheffield (Alderman J. Curtis, J.P.),
seconded by the Master Cutler (R. P. Phillips, Esq.).

Expression of thanks on behalf of the School by the
Head Prefect, N. G. Wellings

Orchestra Gavotte and Bourree (Suite in D)             Bach

English Speech "The Good Schoolmaster" Thomas Fuller (Spoken by N. G. Wellings)

Choir          Madrigal (The Mikado)          Sullivan

German Poem          "The Grenadiers"              H. Heine
(Spoken by E. C. Wragg)

Viola Solo Fantasia on " Greensleeves " Vaughan Williams
(J. P. Catchpole)

Greek Poems         A Cycle of three Poems               Sappho
(Spoken by J. Miller)

Choir            " Rathlin Head "                Rowley

French Poem         " Ma Boheme "                        Rimbaud
(Spoken by A. D. P. Briggs)

Song            "Art Thou Troubled"          Handel
(C. J. Barnes)

Spanish Poem " Cancion de jinete " F. Garcia Lorca
(Spoken by G. Tyas)

Choir and Orchestra " 0 Praise God in His Holiness" Armstrong Gibbs

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN

In the now familiar setting of the Victoria Hall, the School's Jubilee Speech Day was attended by a platform party largely made up of Old Edwardians of local or national eminence, notably Sir Stanley Rawson, one of our earliest distinguished classical scholars, and Mr. R. P. Phillips, our third Old Edwardian Master Cutler.

As visitors often comment favourably on the efficiency as well as the artistic accomplishment displayed in this rather complicated entertainment, we may allow ourselves a general round of mutual congratulations among all who contribute in various ways to the proceedings. For the music, the critic best qualified to sum up does so in the "Music" article on another page. The recitations, by their nature and the physical conditions of the place, impose a formidable ordeal upon the reciters, and one is always impressed by the competence and composure of the selected linguists. Considered as a sequence, these items tend towards a monotony of effect which could perhaps be avoided either by the introduction of some new technique or by more co-ordination with a view to variety and contrast.

THE HEADMASTER'S report opened with a reference to the foundation of the School fifty years ago and a welcome to the platform visitors whose presence appropriately marked this Jubilee Speech Day. Sir Stanley Rawson was a member of the School in 1905 and won a Hastings Scholarship for Classics in 1908. After a distinguished career at Queen's College, Oxford, he became a Fellow of All Soul's. Leaving the quiet life of a scholar in the Arts he became a figure in the world of industry, and served as Comptroller to the firm of Dorman Long & Co., later joining John Brown & Co., Ltd., of which organisation he is now Vice-Chairman. He had also been Director General of Machine Tools under the Ministry of Supply for two years. Reference to old School Magazines revealed that while at School in addition to repeatedly winning Classical Prizes, he shared the winning of Open Doubles at Fives, was very active in the Literary Society and Debating Society, House Captain of Clumber and a School Prefect.

In addition to the Lord Mayor, the Chairman (Alderman Ballard) and the Director of Education, we were glad to welcome the Master Cutler. Mr. R. P. Phillips, who was the third Old Edwardian in succession to occupy that high office. Sir Harold Jackson, a long-standing Governor of the School, was an Old Boy of Wesley College, and Mr. H. W. Middleton head boy of the Grammar School in 1895 and 1896. Dr. Burdekin represented the Old Edwardians Association, and Mr. Brian Pye-Smith the Governors of the Royal Grammar School (whose Trust had, among other benefactions, made a handsome contribution to our Prize funds to increase the number and value of prizes available, mainly in the Sixth Form).

Reviewing the past history of the School, the Headmaster said: "When the School opened in 1905 there were 317 boys on the roll, including a Junior School. This year we have 764 and no Junior School; it is quite evident that we did need our new extensions. The first Headmaster, Dr. Hichens, established the tradition of hard work and examination successes, which have persisted and we hope will. There was perhaps in the early days less attention to the less academic side of school life, but that was remedied largely by Mr. Gurney and Mr. Graham who succeeded Dr. Hichens. The original School had its own Board of Governors and was listed on the Headmasters' Conference. When Mr. Gurney resigned in 1927 the School was removed from the list owing to the change in constitution of the Governing Body; at the same time the O.T.C. was abolished. Mr. Graham replaced the O.T.C. by the School Scouts, of whom we now have three flourishing Troops. In 1944, as a result of the Education Act, the Junior School was closed and fees were abolished. Both sets of events caused considerable local agitation and disagreement, but are, happily for the School, safely forgotten now. The Honours Boards at the School testify eloquently to the academic distinctions gained by its boys during its comparatively brief existence; we must pledge ourselves in this Jubilee Year to maintain these to the best of our ability."

In the school year 1954-55, with an Advanced Course of 201 (96 Classical and Modern, 105 Science) we had obtained 10 awards at Oxford or Cambridge and 7 at other Universities, 16 State Scholarships (a new record), and 93 per cent Passes in "A" Level with 45 Distinctions. "O" Level Passes were 77 per cent., a slight reduction from last year's 79 per cent. 45 boys in all secured places at Universities by Scholarship, College Examinations or on "A" Level results.

"At the British Association meetings this year some pungent comments were made about semi-literate scientists and over-specialisation in schools. One must have some sympathy with rather overworked science student today: faculties usually demand three `A' Level subjects, and as fast as Science advances, so do the examination syllabuses become more ponderous. As a result, the science boy at school has a full time-table with no private-study periods, as distinct from his Modern Side colleagues who often get many which they do not always use fully. Here the Universities definitely set the pace and schools must follow. After settling down to the new examination system, we now find that the Northern Universities are to alter their entry requirements, limiting the number of examinations taken to fulfil the minimum entry conditions. This may serve as a corrective to those few who always try to trim their sails to reach port with the very minimum nicely calculated and who have no use for subjects which they feel do not directly contribute. Our own aim in the Advanced Courses is to secure the maximum number of boys entry to a University, while providing definite relief from over-specialisation by means of additional subjects, but the time-table and examination requirements set some limit on how much can be done in addition to main subject work. If a boy in the Advanced Course is working fully, taking a useful part in School Games and activities, he will have very little time left for his own particular hobbies. He certainly should not find himself faced with the problem of how to employ his leisure."

The LATIN ADDRESS was as follows

Si quidem propositum est huic scholae homines proferre et doctrines institutes et ad rations vitae diversissimas versutos, baud clarius fortasse inter alumnos nostros poterimus invenire exemplar quam hunc nostrum hospitem. Est quidem vir scientia machinali insignissimus, nec quisquam eo peritior oleum e locis longinquioribus per canales hauriendi est nonnullarum linguarum callidus perque plures terras peregrinates -est quam nominare potuisset Herodotus. Sive de carbon sive de atomic sive etiam de tam exsecrabili et obscures vectigalium ration percontari velitis, est ipse in primis consulendus. Post tot tantaque negotia, rogabitis, ad quam remissionem animi se vertit? Dicitur illi hide interesse in quo per cursum lacunis harenosis pertusum progrederis; dicitur quoque etiam nunc libros utriusque linguae, cui primum inter nos studebat, quieto animo evolvere.

Non enim est inter illos qui Didonem putant cumulum mode atomorum esse in Labyrintho Harvellensi instrucuum; nam nonnullos abhinc annos et in schola nostra et inter Oxonienses studio linguarum Latinae Graecaeque iuvenili ardore tantaque animi claritate incumbebat ut cum in schola litterarum humaniorum probates esset, non mode inter primes haberetur sed et ipse princeps et inter socios Omnium Animarum adscriberetur. Post eiusmodi ornaments ingenii novum omnino vitae curriculum in rebus gerendis suscepisse atque adeo prospere gessisse ut ad fastigium eveheretur, testimonium quidem notabile est agilitatis mentis et acuminis.

 Hodie cum adeo de disciplinae modis disputatur, baud scio an non liceat animo volutare quid pretiosi contulerint prima illa studia viro humano et liberali, qui, ut amicus inter amicos, inter nos collocuturus est.

Sir STANLEY RAWSON had come prepared to uphold his reputation as one of the School's outstanding classical scholars. In a few words of elegant Latin he thanked Pinion for his address (tuam, orator optime, et rerum compaginem et sententiarum concinnitates iucundissime exaudivi; inerat summa ars, inerat curiosa dicendi felicitas) .

Sir Stanley's memories of King Edward VII School dated from the time when the newly constituted school was housed in temporary quarters in Church Street, and he congratulated the School on its history of steady progress and present flourishing condition. "I have often thought," he said, "that it says a good deal for the toughness and resilience of the minds of the young that they have withstood successfully the mass and continuity of experimentation they have endured. Nothing of course can be of greater importance than to ascertain the optimum conditions under which the mysterious process of learning can take place learning not only that which requires to be known, but learning how to live. As far as I can see and here I enter a dangerous minefield psychologists, psychiatrists, statisticians record, classify and debate observed results with passionate fury. And through all fog and fury of debate, a school with a personality turns out year by year a series of people who appear to have suffered no great harm from wrong methods and have benefited greatly by methods as to the rightness of which there is no firm agreement. Perhaps I may be rash enough to state another view. School training is not intended to be a method of selection. It is a training in digesting experience. Whatever field of study you may adopt, Classical or Modern Languages and Literature, Mathematics or the Natural Science, you are much more concerned in learning how than what: the what is not difficult: when you have learned the how.

"We are living in a rapidly changing world in which our experience is becoming ever more complicated and diverse. We have to equip men and women to comprehend, apply and control the massive and dangerous forces within human reach. I am not speaking of material forces only, but of the powerful means now at hand to mould, control and direct the minds of whole communities of mankind. It is in relation to the individual that these forces are most threatening and training in the capacity to think clearly is essential if we are to maintain that respect and value for the individual mind which underlie true civilisation. For clear thinking we need clear expression. It is an unfortunate accompaniment of many modern techniques that they create a closed language of their own; and many men of profound technical accomplishment have become almost isolated both in thought and speech from all whose language is not technical symbolism. However crowded a school syllabus may be, however urgent the pressure of new subjects of instruction, time should be found for that training in the art of expressing one's thoughts in coherent speech and intelligible writing."

Four-Fifteen

ROM time to time in fact almost at regular intervals of ten years or so the impression becomes current that out-of-school activities, societies and so on, are in a more flourishing condition than ever before, or even that they are a novel invention of the progressive contemporary generation.

A glance at the School Magazine Vol. I, No. 1, produced in the Lent Term 1906, shows that the first Edwardians had just as much spare time on their hands as we have, and were determined to lose no opportunity of filling up the gaps inevitably left, or created, in their minds by mere formal education.

At the Inaugural Meeting of the Debating Society on 26th October, 1905, it was proposed `That this House, if it were not English, would rather be French than German "-16 for, 19 against. At a date not much later, it was agreed "That the invention of the motor-car was an abomination."

A Literary Society met on 28th November 1905 to hear a lecture by Mr. J. H. Hodgetts on ` A Visit to the Moon in Fiction." A less ambitious visit, in fact, was made by the Scientific Society on 28th February to the Neepsend Works of the Sheffield United Gas Light Company. This Scientific Society originally embraced a number of sub-sections-Chemical, Botanical, Photographic, Geological; but it would seem that these soon ranked as separate organisations and their meetings were conducted independently. Early in 1906 the Microscopical Society heard a talk on "The House Fly and How It can Walk on the Ceiling." The collection and exhibition of specimens formed a large part of the business of this group, and they also held a Social on November 12th, 1907, when " a specimen of the bread-and-butter fly was exhibited." Meanwhile the Geological Society was leaving no stone unturned.

An Orchestra, or at any rate an Orchestral Society, formed the backbone of the first School Concert. The leader was a master's wife. Mrs. Lace, and the instruments comprised 5 first violins, 4 second violins, 1 viola, 1 cello, 2 flutes, 1 cornet, and 1 piano. Drama was mostly represented by short extracts contributed to the programmes of Concerts or Speech Days:, but the full-length play was from the first an established feature in " Lynwood " (which in those days was a boarding-house as well as a school "House " run by Mr. F. T. Saville). At the Lynwood Entertainment on 14th March 1906, a merry, if primitive, farce, entitled " The First Day of the Holidays," was performed; it ran almost as long as " Charley's Aunt," for it was still being performed in the Junior School at least as late as 1927; in fact older readers may be amused to know that the "striped box" turned up only the other day in the clearing-out of accumulated theatrical junk.

The Magazine also tells of a Sketch Club. and a Cycling Club, and of various more or less officially organised expeditions and explorations; while the regular games, of course, were fully established, though then on a voluntary basis and limited to the two half-holidays of Wednesday and Saturday afternoons.

And still time was found for a Cadet Corps, which was inaugurated on 18th June, 1907, under the title of Engineer Cadet Corps, attached to the 1st West Yorkshire Royal Engineers Volunteers. In various different forms, this survived until 1927, when it was disbanded.

Another investigator has brought to our notice some miscellanea of an earlier period, which he found in files of The Sheffield Independent in the Central Library.

The Great Wesley College Revival.

The early days of the College were remarkable for what came to' be known as the Great Revival. Four boys . . . were troubled because so few of the others professed to have given their hearts to God. Every Saturday night they held a prayer meeting, and many of the school lads were influenced for good.

The gracious influence spread marvellously, and some of the meetings were so prolonged that the Governor found it necessary to go round the rooms to forbid the boys singing or praying any more. Furthermore both masters and servants of the neighbouring hamlet of Crooks were drawn into the vortex of the revival.

(Sheffield Independent, 1904).

Sport at the Grammar School (at about 1850).

Football was not played, Cricket and Hockey were our only games, and the rough ground (at school) spoilt these. We had a playing field on a site now occupied by the Winter Street Hospital but this was only used on special occasions. It belonged to Miss Harrison of Weston Park, a narrow-minded but godly lady who had painted on the adjoining gables " Prepare to meet thy God,": "Where shalt thou spend Eternity? "and other texts suitable to boys.

(Sheffield Independent, 1884).

An Athletic Headmaster (Dr. Shera).

Who could kick that football further, from one side of the ground to the other? Who could take a football as it landed to him and throw it over the College? Who could throw the hammer or put the cannon-ball far beyond the Herculean capabilities of any expert? . . . He was respected, loved, and admired.

(Wesley College: An Old Boy remembers. 1913)

THE PEREGRINE FALCON

The white swan, in majestic flight,
Has a wing-span long and broad;
But though the falcon's build is slight,
He still remains the lord.

On motionless wings he glides along,
His presence striking fear;
The other birds forget their song
When he, in might, draws near.

The fearsome claws are needle-sharp,
The beak a wicked curve
He kills his prey from high above
Diving, without a swerve.

He hovers in the pale blue sky
On deadly purpose bent;
He plummets down without a cry—
And death has struck again.

M. S. HORWOOD.

A Transatlantic Adventure

HAVING decided quite early on in life that my aim was to become a pilot in the Royal Air Force, I joined the local squadron of the A.T.C. in 1952. In 1955 I attended a series of R.A.F. interviews for overseas flights in the summer. These interviews usually commence with some searching questions on current affairs, such as " What do you think of the situation in Outer Mongolia? " After suitably evasive answers have been given, one's educational certificates, gliding licence and pilot's licence are presented and murmurs of approval (or otherwise) are made by the Board. An experienced candidate can, I believe, interpret these and so anticipate the result. By luck, and a study of The Manchester Guardian (to find out what was happening in Outer Mongolia) I was fortunate enough to be one of twenty-five cadets from England, `. Ireland, Scotland and Wales, selected for the " plum ' reciprocal visit, that to the U.S.A.

After an interminable period of waiting and recovering from injections for a galaxy of ailments (as required by the U.S. immigration authorities) we were called to London for the flight over, which was made in an American aircraft of the 'MATS (Military Air Transport Service) in company with French, Belgian, Swiss, Italian, Spanish, 'Norwegian, Swedish and Danish cadets. Our aircraft being diverted to Bermuda on the way, the British contingent forgot the song " . . . and Englishmen and promptly acquired sunstroke in varying degrees. This appears to be a common phenomenon whenever Englishmen travel to the tropics.

Slowly recovering (with the aid of all the latest preparations) from our encounter with the tropical sun, we flew northwards to Washington D.C., where for a week we were shown round the beautiful capital city and lived on a U.S.A.F. base with over a hundred other cadets from all over the world. This reciprocal visit includes twenty-three countries; the theme is " friendship through aviation," and we certainly made great friends with all the other cadets, especially the Canadians, Swedes and Chileans. We were impressed by the enormous monuments to past Presidents, and by the contrast between the white stone, blue sky and green grass, these colours being really as portrayed in the post cards! The heat was overpowering, averaging just over 100°F, and the best method of keeping cool was to go into an air-conditioned (70°F) store.

From Washington we flew north to the state of Michigan, and here we spent a very pleasant fortnight visiting places of interest and swimming in the many lakes (water temperature 80°F). We stayed in private homes and gained much knowledge about the " American way of life." Their standard of living appears to be higher than ours, each host family (of the "middle class ") possessing two cars, which we proceeded to drive about with gay abandon. I managed to log 4 hours on seven cars of five different makes and found it quite easy to accustom myself to driving on the right. The roads are much wider than ours, having lanes marked out and allotted to different speeds. As one accelerates away from a busy town one passes successive limit areas, 15-25-35 50, until the road is delimited. The secondary roads are bad, usually unsurfaced and conducive to skidding. The cars are larger and higher powered than British cars, the average being about 150 b.h.p. All new American cars have "automatic transmission," that is, automatic gear-changing. Thus only a brake and accelerator pedal are needed, and driving is much simplified. Powered steering, window and seat adjustment, are also common. The latest device is a photo-electric cell at the bonnet which automatically dips the headlamps at night as another car approaches! In Michigan we saw Drive-in Theatres, Cafes, and Hotels. The first is a cinema with a huge concrete screen. A car-park radiates from it with parking lots marked off, each containing a loudspeaker positioned so as to be near the driver's window. The Drive-in Cafes are similar; sometimes a phone system exists, mounted within reach of the driver's window; in any case one need not stir from the car, for the meal is brought by a waitress.

On the shores of Lake Michigan are extensive sand dunes; we rode on what are called " dune scooters," old cars or " jalopies " specially adapted for sand travel. The ride was very exhilarating, goggles having to be worn to protect the eyes from flying sand. We rode along at up to 50 m.p.h. up and down (and in one case backwards) over slopes of up to 1 in 1 gradient. Several cadets, including myself, had some experience of water skiing, usually culminating in a fall at 30-40 m.p.h. In Michigan also we who possessed British Pilots' licences were able to compare American methods in Civil Aviation. We found a much greater civilian interest in flying both in the "average man" and the authorities. The number of flying clubs in proportion to the population is much greater than in Britain.

American girls? We found them delightful, and on the average they appeared prettier than the British variety, but this nay be due to a greater attention to their appearance. We were taken to dances, barbecues, or Wiener Roasts." At a barbecue a whole meal is cooked on an outdoor fire, whereas at a " Wiener Roast " the hamburgers or hot dogs are the only article which is cooked.

Regretfully leaving Michigan, we flew to New York, being impressed on the way by the amount of light radiating from towns and highways at night. New York greeted us with British weather, for Hurricane Connie was at its height. No wind, however, was felt in the streets, for the gigantic skyscrapers shielded then. New York in the rain was a dismal sight, the tallest buildings disappearing in the rain-clouds. When we were at the 102nd storey of the Empire State Building the wind was at 70 m.p.h., with gusts of up to 120 m.p.h. The engineering marvel in which we stood swayed only six inches or so.

One morning we were wakened earlier than usual and left the 42-storey Waldorf Astoria Hotel ($20 per day per room) for the N.B.C. television studio our third TV appearance in U.S.A. After our turn we saw the chimpanzee J. Fred Muggs, who is in Britain a symbol of American commercial TV. -Most of the adverts we saw were unobjectionable but they tended to break into the middle of programmes. The advantage of the commercial system is that you can tune in to between five and fifteen different programmes of varying strengths and qualities.

All too soon we were winging our way homeward via the Azores, and on arriving over London at midnight we were able to contrast it with the blaze of light which is New York. On touch-down -we were welcomed by a waiting Royal Air Force bus and a hot meal at the R.A.F. station at Uxbridge. Regretfully our party of 25 split up, said goodbye to the two R.A.F. officers who had accompanied us, and travelled back to our hones, each cadet being very much the wiser for this memorable experience.

I. W. STRACHAN.

Awheel in Germany

THREE questions-when? where? and how - confront the prospective continental visitor. By the end of the Christmas Term (1954) six members of " C " Troop had decided at least the first point, and perhaps the second two as well. A study of the nap of Europe from Norway to the Mediterranean and from the Bay of Biscay to Greece suggested that the education authorities had been a little stern in restricting our holidays to a mere six weeks but eventually a cycling holiday in Bavaria and Austria was fixed up. Even parents had to agree that £21 was cheap for a month anywhere.


STADTISCHES GYMNASIUM, KREUZGASSE.

The sea was calm; but the presence of some bonnie lassies from Dunfermline Grammar School seemed to liven up the voyage for some members of the party. Five hours after leaving the White Cliffs on the horizon, we were walking down the platform of Brussels Midi, and a few minutes later were involved in our first French conversation, which ended `' Get chasing that number twenty-seven tram.

What struck us about Cologne Youth Hostel was the fine rendering of " The Queen " at six o'clock in the morning. and a notice which announced: At least the following were stolen from here yesterday:-1 bicycle, 1 rucksac complete with gear, 1 camera, and 1 purse." We tried German sausage here for the first tine. On the first day's run we covered only twenty miles, owing to the stiff gradient and a Black Forest storm, in which giant hailstones chipped paint off our cycles, and a stream of rainwater a yard wide ran down each side of the road. This was the day when we cooked a three-course meal at the side of the main street in Titisee, and slept in a barn because the Youth Hostel was full up.

After spending £5 on a night and two half-days in Switzerland we crossed Lake Constance on a steamer and competed with about a hundred others of our age to sleep three in two beds in the "Seagull's Nest." We cannot sufficiently describe the wonders of Ludwig's castle of Neuschwanstein and the historical associations of his father's castle. Hohenschwangen, but both visits are well worth the seemingly high price of admission. At the Youth Hostel at Fussen we were " asked " to sing and our harmonica expert made us very popular by playing " Cherry Pink -Mambo." The long climb over Seefeld Pass well deserved the spell of fine weather that we encountered in Austria. This was rather offset by a strong headwind and terrible road surfaces which made cycling difficult, though not unpleasant. The highlight of our Austrian visit was undoubtedly a ride by the Kaiserberg in a chairlift.

All too soon we were catching a train to return to England, though we found time to go to the pictures, visit another castle, and buy presents, notably bottles of liqueur and cigars, to bring back with us along with our memories of countless happy incidents-of the Egyptians who talked in " little squiggles," of the boy who gave us a present for his girl friend in Sheffield, of the many varieties of food that we sampled, and of the multitudes of friendly people whom we met in every village.

J. M. F. GAGAN.

Cologne

(Once again, a number of our boys exchanged visits in the summer of 1955 with boys from the Kreuzgasse School in Cologne. Here are some of the things they noticed).

THE Kreuzgasse grammar-school was destroyed in the war and has just been rebuilt, so it has few traditions. The building itself, situated on the west bank of the Rhine at some distance from the city-centre, is very modern in design. It is' rectangular, with a flat roof and a large area of windowspace, which makes the classrooms light but very warm in summer. The School is surrounded by its own Basketball courts and Soccer pitches, though the latter are rather sparsely grassed. The glass frontage to the staircase at the north end of the school is quite notable, with coloured panes; the modernistic atmosphere is heightened by the paintings in the actual classrooms. The several storeys have different colour-schemes and sport pot-plants and sculptures on the landings of the staircase. Thus the surroundings are pleasant, even if the building does look somewhat austere. To the (professed) disgust of the boys, part of the building is at present occupied by a girls' school awaiting new premises; and another feature of school life is the daily landing at midday of a helicopter on the nearby field, an event which disrupts all work for a time and is extremely popular with the boys.

G. N.

The Cologne trams differ from those in Sheffield in that they are single-deckers but have two or as many as three carriages. There is a conductor in each of the carriages, but only one driver for the whole combination. The bell system is intriguing, and consists of a cord running from end to end of each carriage. The conductor in the last carriage rings his bell and the message is passed on by each conductor in turn until it reaches the driver. There is a one-price ticket for all single journeys, but an Umsteiger " must be bought if a passenger needs to change trams to reach his destination.

J. A. R.

Returning from Bonn by car, we swept round a long drive and joined the Bonn-Koln Autobahn at high speed. On the left, a broad grass verge could be seen, and beyond it the other traffic lane; each lane is as wide as many British roads. The concrete-slab road surface makes for very high speeds by both light and heavy traffic, and indeed a heavy lorry and trailer overtook us once at sixty miles per hour. We were able to maintain a high speed all the way, keeping to the right, of course, and turned off the Autobahn outside Cologne down another sweeping drive. having covered about fifteen miles in less than twenty minutes.

G. P.

For a long time now the Germans have firmly adopted one solution to the problems of cityplanning by building blocks of flats instead of family houses. These blocks are usually five or six storeys high, very solid, and, in Cologne at any rate, built of a greyish stone. They give you the impression that it never occurred to the architect to make them look attractive from the outside. You are also struck by the neat array of bell-pushes and small name-plates in each doorway. If you press one of the bells, and attempt to enter, you find the door locked, until a buzzer sounds from within and the door is unlocked by remote control from one of the flats. Unless you are familiar with the building, you must then examine a brass plate in the gloomy entrance-hall, to discover on which floor your host lives. The homes are, however, like the people. quite pleasant, and there are certainly none which compare unfavourably with the slum dwellings in this country.

R. A. B.

What is my most lasting memory of Cologne? It can only be that of the Rhine, which adds its own character to that of the ancient city, and brings to it the unforgettable Rhineland magic of wine and song. I remember cruises upstream to Bonn, birthplace of Beethoven, and present-day seat of government, then on to the famous Drachenfels, the ruined castle atop steep vine-clad slopes. I remember the terrace where you can sit over refreshments and look out over the river. Most of all I remember Cologne at night; seen from midstream, with her light-bespangled waterfront, and her majestic Cathedral towering, floodlit, above the traffic.

C. H.

Belgrade

LAST summer I was fortunate enough to be included in a party to spend a month in Yugoslavia, staying in the home of a Yugoslav family. Belgrade is the capital of old Serbia and the modern Yugoslavia. Although it has been almost completely destroyed eighteen times in its long history-the last time being in 1941 when 300 Nazi bombers reduced it to a heap of rubble, killing 25,000 people before lunchtime-Belgrade is now a fine modern city. The streets are fine and wide: beautiful squares are surrounded by

 magnificent buildings nine storeys high. and everywhere one can feel the deep pride that the Serbians hold for their capital city. Unfortunately, when rebuilding began, the people were a little too ambitious, and on the mudflats across the Sava there now stands the outline of a huge block of flats and the empty buildings of a new University. Work was begun on these projects but the finances failed and only the shells were constructed.

The city has an important position on a ridge at the confluence of the two mighty rivers, the Danube and the Sava. Spreading away to the north, to Hungary, are vast fertile plains, while to the south and east are the heights of the Balkan mountains. The English party in Belgrade was able to make a trip seventy miles down the Danube, through the " Iron Gates." Here the Danube narrows to less than 100 yards across and the mountains rise sheer from the water to a height of more than 1,000 feet. After leaving the gorge, we got several delightful glimpses of Yugoslav villages. They consist of a few houses and a church grouped around an old wharf. The weekly steamer is their only communication with the outside world, and the entire population of each village was gathered on the quay to greet the ship.

The Serbian cuisine is very different from ours. Far more meat is eaten, and everything is swimming in grease. After a week of indigestion and near-starvation, I at last became accustomed to it and enjoyed it considerably. I soon found that everything which is not absolutely essential is very expensive indeed. Tea costs roughly £4 a pound, and a very poor quality suit costs twice as much as a good English one. On an average wage, the Yugoslav can just manage to live, but without any luxuries. The State owns all shops (as well as all private cars, newspapers, and factories) so it can charge exorbitant prices for everything.

Our Serbian hosts, we found, were somewhat slow in showing us their city, and finally we English people had to suggest places to visit. Nevertheless, they and their parents did everything possible to make our stay a happy one, and, if possible, I shall certainly return to Yugoslavia next year.

 M. B. HILL .

Switzerland

SEVENTEEN boys boys and three masters spent eight days last summer at Kandersteg, a village at the end of the motor-road running south from Spiez, on Lake Thun, up the Kander valley. Although the road ends there, and further progress up to the Gemmi Pass, leading to Leukerbad, must be on foot-in earlier times by sedan chair -the railway penetrates the mountains and enters the Rhone valley to the south by the Lotschberg tunnel, very near to the entrance to which we were staying.

Apart from one day, which we spent in Spiez, the weather was quite good and w e made good use of our time. One day was spent on a coach tour over the Susten, Grimsel and Furka passes another on a lightning trip into Italy, via Lotschberg and Simplon, to Stresa. This excursion nearly ended at Brig, in Switzerland, where the trains for Italy were packed full. We had half a day in Bern on the homeward journey. The rest of our time was spent in walks and climbs-for those who felt energetic enough. Those more easily fatigued took gentler strolls within the valley, and, in my opinion, certainly missed something by not going into the mountains. One most memorable hike (taken by only a few) took us to the Frunden hut, on the Blumlisalp, the start of the snowfield. A hike into a remote and wild hanging valley, far above Kandersteg, was memorable for the method devised for descending the snow slope on the return journey: this is to rush down, out of control, in any convenient posture except the erect, preferably with one's back to the direction of advance, so that no fears arise from seeing disaster ahead. Happily no misfortunes except a lost watch and a camera dropped down a steep place but recovered in working order. One of my colleagues was unhappily taken ill, and returned privately by sleeping-car to the Channel coast.

It was a great pleasure to take the party, which was singularly well behaved and a credit to school and country.

E. L. K.

Hostelling

"EVENING, brother," says the Warden, who has a great, big, thick, black beard, a red shirt and khaki shorts. " You're in No.. 3 Dorm. round the back and up into the loft over the stable. Supper in twenty minutes."

I fight my way through a crowd of hostellers and eventually find the stable. Fortunately it is empty, which should forecast a quiet night's sleep. Climbing up the rickety steps, I receive a hefty crack on the head from a wooden beam. A hearty gust of laughter hails this entrance, and I examine my tormentors. Only ten of them, but what a mixture! They range from six-foot he-men to a tiny Indo-Chinese who looks about eight. He turned out to be fourteen.

After making up my bed (a 30 second job) a wash becomes the next essential. The bathroom presents itself as a pump and a bucket, behind a galvanised iron screen. Despite this I make myself presentable for the evening meal and wash about seventy miles of road off my feet.

Meals in most hostels are excellent, and this one proved no exception. Starting with a double helping of soup, we continued with shepherd's pie, and polished off with apple tart and cream -fresh, clotted, and plenty-washed down with pints of tea. The evening passed all too quickly with a quiet saunter round the warm, green Cornish countryside in congenial company. At about ten o'clock we parted for our respective dormitories and prepared for bed: more horse-work at the pump. Half-past-ten brought the Warden round for "lights out " and theoretical silence. At midnight the early sleepers turned in, and half-an-hour later the party broke up. The Warden never made a murmur; possibly because the stable was separate from the main block.

Breakfast came at half-past-eight and consisted of fresh salmon caught by the Warden himself. My duty was to help wash up the pots -not so pleasant a task.

Hostelling is great fun, and for five or six shillings for supper, bed, and breakfast, is one of the cheapest holidays available. But keep clear of certain hostels (which you will learn from experience); and don't take a packed lunch.

J. How.

Private Enterprise

AT the head of a small valley in Merionethshire, there lies a disused slate quarry. Its former bustle and activity have gone, and in their place grow grass and weeds. The quarry's only outlet to the sea, some seven or eight miles away, was by a single track narrow-gauge railway. Both were a part of each other. Now the quarry is closed, but the railway, thanks to the efforts of a small group of railway enthusiasts, remains open.

In 1950. Sir Hayden Jones, the owner of the line, died. The railway was threatened with closure: but with the permission of Lady Hayden, the Talyllyn Railway Preservation Society was formed to operate the railway as a non-profit-making company. This is now the fifth summer that the railway has continued to run under the Society's management. Towyn, the lower terminus, is a small seaside resort between the rivers Dovey and Mawddach. Barmouth lies six miles to the north, and Aberystwyth twelve to the south. These resorts attract many visitors and only the tourist trade keeps the ninety-year old line open. The slate traffic is gone, the local negligible. The railway depends on the visitor, and on the attraction of the trip which, in an open coach in summer, is extremely pleasant.

When the Society took over in 1950, the railway was literally falling apart. Twenty-five years of niggardly management had left its mark. Of the two original locomotives. one "Talyllyn" was out of commission through bad maintenance and happy-go-lucky operating. The other, Dolgoch " was decrepit, but somehow ran. Parts would drop off occasionally on to the track. Maintenance prior to 1950 was nil. The only tool, it seemed, was a hammer. The engines, then 85 years old, had fallen to pieces. The track was in the same dilapidated condition: the rails were overgrown with weeds, indeed in places one could not see the rails, only two dull brown lines of crushed grass. The sleepers had rotted, and the chairs were useless. In more than one place the turves held the rail, consequently the track had widened and the gauge was approaching 2 ft. 5 in. instead of the official 2 ft. 3 in. The coach and wagon stock was also tumbledown. The springs had gone and many of the wagons rotted apart, leaving extremely few of a once extensive stock. These were the conditions that faced the Society.

The train service was maintained while work, the first for many years, was undertaken on the track. Before anything could be done, the correct tools had to be purchased. Members put in work in their own time. Slowly the membership grew. Two locomotives and a van were bought from the neighbouring Corris railway. "Dolgoch," after 89 years of service, was sent for repair and another locomotive was presented to the Society. Train service increased to three trains a day, with a spare engine for emergencies. Coaches were built by the Society and traffic increased. Membership soon reached 1,000, many of whom spend their holidays, as did I for the second v ear. working on the railway. Today over half the 6-1 miles has been relaid. and work is under way on the rest. Slowly the railway is regaining its feet and last year made a profit, a small one, but nevertheless a profit, a thing unheard of on the Talyllyn for over forty years.

The Talyllyn is a little company. Everyone knows everyone else. Here we have a group of enthusiasts from all walks of life who have come together with a common purpose, to run a railway, to " play trains " on a large scale. This is the essence of the Talyllyn. There is no standardisation here. There are no labour wrangles, no red tape. In these days of state control, standardisation, and super-efficiency (?), it is a relief to find a railway that is not under the aegis of those inspiring initials of B.R., not subject to a distant official, nor suffering from departmentalisation and other bugbears of nationalised industries, and whose locomotives and rolling stock, distinctly Victorian, are not of the same colour nor the same type. Our railways have unfortunately lost their individual characters. The Talyllyn has not.

N. G. WELLINGS.

26 Days Afore the Mast

(A course at the Outward Bound Sea School at Burghead, in Morayshire).

THE object of these courses is to train one's character by means of sheer hard work, physical exhaustion and every type of hardship. One soon learns to face up to such difficulties with at least an appearance of enjoyment, which the companionship of one's fellow trainees soon turns into reality. I retain many vivid memories of the course

The arrival, after a journey of over 20 hours, when the bus swung up the neat, white-railed drive to the modern-looking buildings of glass, wood and concrete, gleaming in the sun; and the dormitory hut, with its iron bunks, concrete floor, and wooden lockers . . .

Athletics, when we strove for continual improvement over 100 yards, half-mile, 2 miles, 5 miles, long jump, high jump; and coupled with this, the assault course; with its ropes, logs, trestles, and of course its scrambling net standing some 40 feet high. (At my first attempt, I flew over the top, without holding on. A pleasant sensation, at first) . . .

The sleepy village, with its Low Cafe. This was entirely patronised by Outward Bounders, and served by " Rosie " and" Toots," who came to the station to bid us a tearful farewell when we left . . .

The bicycles on which we rode to the harbour. Mine was ageless-it could age no more. The pedals were loose, the chain slipped, the brakes worked only hesitantly, the bell not at all. The saddle pointed vaguely towards square-leg, and the position of the handlebars bore no relation to the way the front wheel was going. The tyres were consistently flat . . .

 

THE PRINCE LOUIS

The week in the Cairngorms, climbing impossible mountains, under impossible loads, in impossible weather. We slept under canvas, or more often in the open. The food was atrocious, but we relished it. The " specialite de la maison " was a stew of cold, muddy water and corned beef, backed up by tea-suitably disguised-and a concoction of oats and water, tentatively called by some " porridge " . . .

The Prince Louis, an old three-masted schooner, recently converted from a Danish timber ship. We spent a week voyaging in her; first to Peterhead, where we rowed in a Regatta and dead-heated for first place; then out into the North Sea. We were divided into watches; I was on duty from 2 to 4 a.m., as helmsman and lookout alternately. The former duty consisted of swinging the wheel violently this way and that, in accordance with the vagaries of the spot of light on the compass-card, in a world of dark shadows; the latter of watching the white foam, fringed with phosphorescence, curve across the wine-dark sea from the silent progress of the bows, and the intricately rigged masts standing out in silhouette from the brilliantly shining stars set in a velvet sky. In the daytime we were often " beaten up ' by jet-fighters from Kinloss -flashing down behind us about 15 feet above the sea and 30 feet from the side of the ship. We passed the Britannia, with the Queen aboard, and sent a message of loyalty; we immediately received a reply, from Her Majesty herself . . .

Finally, the prize-giving, where we were all given awards according to our merits.

D. BARRON.

 Music

SPEECH Day always comes upon us before the Choir and Orchestra have really settled down, and crowded conditions, heat, and the long wait before the music all militate against effective performance. The more credit is therefore due to our musicians that these factors did not unduly disturb them. The Orchestra deployed in record time, and if Bach turned in his grave during the next few minutes it was to turn his better ear to their spirited playing and perhaps to raise a quizzical eyebrow at the addition of clarinets, trombones and euphonium to his scoring of the Suite in D. Of the Choir's two pieces, Rowley's Rathlin Head " turned out better than Sullivan's " Madrigal", confirming an opinion that Sullivan is difficult to do really well. Forces combined effectively to close with Armstrong Gibbs's stirring Psalm CL. Meanwhile C. J. Barnes had come through his solo singing ordeal well and Catchpole had given us the " Greensleeves " Fantasia with exquisite artistry. (Would that more of our instrumentalists, who generally plead lack of time, would set themselves a similar standard of attainment).

We had been able to give more attention this year to an entirely new batch of carols, and a greater precision and polish than usual resulted at the service in the Cathedral, which was well filled in spite of the inclement weather. Balance was better, notably in the stronger alto and tenor parts, and even the unfamiliar idiom of Britten's "There is no Rose " was well managed. After a Singing-in-Tune competition, for which thirteen excellent trebles and altos entered, C. E. Nicholson, of the infallible ear, was again chosen for the opening unaccompanied solo verse, and the Choir followed him with a well-timed unaccompanied second verse.

The Orchestra has increased to fifty-one, and noteworthy have been the able leadership of Buchan, and the unusually quick grasp of continuo-playing by Watson (whom we also congratulate on his Distinction in Grade III piano). We welcome to the Orchestra J. J. Fearne and T. Henderson (violin), B. D. Needham (viola), P. J. Quarrel (cello), M. Turner (oboe), A. J. Revill (bassoon), P. Kenning (horn), M. Lewis (euphonium) and R. J. Thompson (drums). After much delay we were fortunate in securing Mr. Vincent Bradley as violin class instructor, a field in which he has had much experience.

The programme for the Jubilee Concert on May 2 takes final shape, and we can promise a meaty first half, containing Stanford's Bb Te Deum. Handel's Sixth Chandos Anthem, and part of Mozart's Clarinet Concerto (soloist, R. A. Bomber): and a second half of lighter fare including the 'lolanthe " overture, Armstrong Gibbs's well-known Waltz " Dusk", Jacob's Jamaican Rumba (piano duet.) and items by the Madrigal Group, who are in good voice as usual. There will be a finale in which all will be encouraged to join, and we hope support will be such that the Victoria Hall will be full.

A feature of the term has been a resumption of lunch-hour concerts run by a committee representative of both junior and senior sections. Reports on these appear elsewhere. Grateful thanks are due to those who have busied themselves with this. It must be admitted that the organisation creaked at times, that so far too few musicians have been brave enough to appear, and that the standard of performance (particularly in the junior field) has not always been as high as it could be. However, these are points which can and will be remedied.

N. J. B.

The Library

THE circulation of books in the Christmas Term rose to 2.400, the largest figure so far. Some titles are in particularly heavy demand, and an appeal is made to borrowers to return their books more promptly. A few boys are passing books on to their personal friends instead of returning them first to the Library, and these in their turn pass the book further. The risk of loss or a fine being levied on the original borrower is obvious, so it has to be emphasised that books are not transferable. The librarians collect fines more in grief than glee--of this our public should be assured-but they wonder whether monetary inflation has rendered our modest system of fine ineffective. Returning friends tell us that at the Oxford Colleges late books cost their borrowers sixpence a day in some places, in others a shilling. We do not aspire to enter into competition with these rates.

Two new bookcases which have been so badly needed for the past year have at last been delivered and now hold the Fiction and Biography sections. About 1,000 volumes which were previously stacked up on inaccessible ledges have consequently now found their proper places in the collection.

Gifts are gratefully acknowledged from: D. Anderson, M. C. E. Andrews, G. S. Ecclestone. D. A. Elliott, B. Hill, J. R. Hoole, R. G. Lawler, C. B. Laycock, Mr. G. Mackay, R. Massey, Mrs. P. J. Menneer, W. P. 'Newcombe, Mr. G. Nornable, D. T. Protheroe, P. K. Richardson, Mr. F. B. Senior, M. A. Sharpe, P. Swain, D. S. Taylor, C. M. _N. Vere.

J. O.

School Societies

Student Christian Movement

The S.C.M. has once more displayed the grounds on which it claims to be one of the School's most flourishing societies. The programme was exceptionally full and varied, vet there was no meeting which did not reach a high standard both in the introductory talk and the lively discussion which followed. A very pleasing balance was maintained between introductions to discussions by actual S.C.M. members and by outside speakers. In subject we have been surprisingly orthodox, although rather violent and original views have, as usual, sometimes shocked newcomers. This, however, is in the true S.C.M. tradition.

A discussion on " Has the Church failed in its mission? " begun by Vere and Jackson, immediately considered fundamentals. The two succeeding meetings prepared for the first interschool gathering at the Girls' High School on " What is the Church? " The Rev. J. C. Shadden chose his points carefully and expressed them lucidly in his talk on Anglicanism, and the school's visitor, Herr Kohl, explained some points about the Roman Catholic Church with special reference to Germany. Three memorable meetings followed: Wilcock opened a discussion on " Division in the Church," and two weeks later came a successful innovation which we hope will be continued. The Girls' High School was invited for a preliminary discussion introduced by Drewery for the next inter-school meeting at Abbeydale. Mr. R. T. Brookes gave a thought-provoking talk, again on Christian Division.

Our gratitude is due as ever to Mr. Summers for his constant help and guidance. Thanks are also given to our efficient Treasurer, C. M. N. Vere, who leaves this term after gaining a Hastings Scholarship.

K. J.

Modern Language Society

M. Chizelle, beginning the term with a talk on his native province of Auvergne, set a high standard for the following meetings. Herr Kohl, extending Higginbottom's talk on Cologne, answered several general questions, giving us a deeper insight into the problems of present day Germany. How and Greaves, who were to have given talks on their travels in Norway and Spain, had them postponed to the next meeting. Then Briggs and Wragg gave two talks for examination purposes on Balzac and Verlaine. At the last meeting of the term, Mr. Bramhall picked out the essential qualities of French music, illustrating his ideas with several records, in spite of technical difficulties with the gramophone. The attendance has been promising and augurs well for the future.

A. A. G.

Economics Society

A programme of less frequent and more selective meetings has resulted in high attendances which, moreover, tended to increase as the term progressed. It is pleasing to see a strong nucleus representing the Science side. The term opened with a talk by the versatile Dr. Kohl, who gave his personal view of post-war industrial development in his own country. In presenting the impressions of an "average " though well-informed citizen, he ensured that the main points were not lost in factual detail. His explanation of current prosperity dispelled the commonly held view of more hardworking German labour force, attributing it rather to American aid and new machinery.

To appreciate Mr. Alexander's treatment of the problems of industrial relations, some knowledge of economics was desirable if not essential; his diagrammatic approach, nevertheless, enabled the clash in wages policy between economics and ethics to be more clearly seen.

Mr. M. H. Waite, father of a member of 6MS2, attracted an attendance of over 40 for his talk on Assize Courts, stimulated no doubt by a previous visit paid by some members to a murder trial. The historical development and structure of the Courts were dealt with and procedure was illustrated from recent cases in Sheffield and London. It is worthy of note that a solicitor gave complete support to the present jury system.

To complete the term's activities, certain members have undertaken or been chosen to visit a coal-mine. Whether this will result in improved central heating at school remains to be seen.

P. J.

Classical Society.

Never has such a galaxy of wit, versatility and scholarship been seen in this Society; we have been addressed by students, masters and lecturers, who have provided us with a varied programme. Representing the students were Miller and Evison, who spoke respectively on the topics of Minoan Scripts and Classical Parlour-games. Mr. Chalmers gave a well-illustrated talk entitled " Two typical classical buildings." Mr. May attempted, very successfully, to tell us what " A Classic'" is. There were some rather startling ideas expounded by Mr. West, of Sheffield University, on the subject of the functions of a classicist, which were sufficient to arouse the heated interest of several of the more distinguished members of the Society. Finally, we issue a plea for better attendance at these meetings, especially from some of the older members, and for more lively debate from the floor.

L. J. Y.

Scientific Society

Attendance at the Annual General Meeting was disappointing; but the opening lectures of the term, on Steel Tube Making by Mr. C. W. Spalding, and The Weather, by Mr. J. Barwick, were well attended and much enjoyed by all present. On November 21, I. W. Strachan gave a lecture called "Aerodynamics and the Sound Barrier." This proved to be the high-light of the term, for it was obvious that the speaker had spent much time and trouble in preparing his lecture. The President of the Society expressed his opinion that it was the best lecture given by a boy of the School for many years. On November 28, at a joint meeting with the Debating Society, the motion was debated

That a scientific education is the most useful basis for modern life." The principal speakers were J. N. Shillito and A. E. Hanwell: the motion was carried by 46 votes to 37.

Further meetings were not possible in the Christmas term owing to the number of boys involved in University examinations. A visit by a party of twenty boys to the works of Howell & Co., by the kind invitation of '_Mr. Spalding, was arranged for the last day of term.

A. E. H.

Photographic Society

As soon as the First Form group photographs had been printed at the beginning of term, the darkroom was opened to members and Mr. Vernon showed novices how to carry out the more important processes. After this the dark-room was in continuous use except for one or two days when it was closed to members as we had decided to buy a plate camera and wanted to test several which we had obtained on approval. A Zeiss Ikon with f/4.5 Tessar lens was finally selected and bought. At the end of the term our treasurer, I. W. Strachan is leaving to go to Cranwell, and we would like to take this opportunity to thank him for his services and wish him luck in the R.A.F.

D. J. S.

International Discussion Group

Officials elected: Chairman, -N. S. Waite Secretary, C. M. N. Vere.

After the School Election of the summer term, the group has had to settle again to more sedate activities, debates and meetings without heckling. The opening meeting dealt with Cyprus. Longden gave the Government side of the problem, and Vere gave Cypriot views. Vocal talent in our 5th Form members was revealed, and Herr Kohl of Spiers, a visiting German headmaster, was very much impressed by the freedom of the views expressed.

For October 24th, United Nations Day, we invited Miss Edith Freeman, the local secretary, to speak on " Ten years of U.N." Despite a chauvinistic broadside from a member who shall remain anonymous, she was able to give a convincing survey of the value of United Nations. The third meeting was jointly arranged with the Literary and Debating Society on a motion concerning the suitability of a scientific education. The House forgot this and instead pursued an Arts v. Science wrangle. The Sheffield Africa Week provided the, subject for our final meeting, when a party visited the exhibition " A People Apart " in the Cathedral.

C.E.W.C. in Sheffield has again been supported, and Mr. Robinson has become joint secretary. Members have attended meetings at the City Grammar School and a new departure, a Saturday night film and social, was very successful. We must give honourable mention to the Sheffield team which reached the National Semi-final of the United Nations Quiz (with a bye!). A branch of U.N. Association Training Section organised by K. Jackson has received some Sixth Form support, but many more could enjoy its activities if they would make the effort.

C. M. N. V.

Chess Club

Friday night meetings have been very well attended by the Juniors. Many Seniors, however, apparently prefer to play during the dinner hours, and too few attend on Friday evenings. The Juniors naturally show more enthusiasm than proficiency, and their team has lost its only match. The Senior team, despite lack of support, has had a successful term in which it won two and drew two of its four matches. We are looking forward to some interesting fixtures next term and hope that more Seniors will attend the weekly meetings.

E. M. S.

RESULTS:

c. Nether Edge (H) drawn 2-2; Juniors lost 3-O.
v. De La Salle (A) won 4-2.
v. Firth Park (H) drawn 3-3.
v. University (A) won 4-2.

Literary and Debating Society

Three meetings have been held. At the first, a most interesting lecture on the Irish Theatre was given by Mr. Henry. This was followed, on November 14, by a joint meeting with the I.D.G. and Scientific societies, when the motion That this House believes that a scientific training is the most useful basis for education " was debated. After much heated and interesting, if not always relevant argument. the motion was carried by 47 votes to 38. Because this joint venture was so successful, it is hoped that a similar one will be arranged for next term. At the final meeting, aspects of modern entertainment were reviewed and discussed, N. S. Waite, G. Wells and N. G. Wellings effectively considering the cinema, the theatre, and the novel respectively, and leading the ensuing commentaries. In conclusion I should like to say how pleasing it has been to see members of the Science Fifth and Sixth at our meetings, and would stress again that the Society welcomes all members of the Upper School.

P. R. M.

Middle School Debating Society

We are pleased to say that the support which this revived society has received has been most encouraging. At the three meetings held, attendance was good, and in the debates most boys readily took an active part. The subject of the first debate was " That this House believes in flying saucers," a motion which was well contested, the final vote resulting in a narrow win for the proposition. At the second meeting, "This House prefers the good old days of Merrie England " was the motion, most ably put forward by R. F. Laughton, but successfully,. if less brilliantly, countered by P. Benton. The final meeting was, however, the most successful, for a great crowd packed the L.L.R. to hear Mr. Johnston's lecture on Modern Humour and thoroughly enjoyed his highly amusing talk. We would conclude by thanking the Committee who have worked hard for the society's success, and we hope that next term's meetings will be even more successful.

P. R. M.. P. S. H.

Middle School Natural History Society

Five meetings during the Christmas Term included a film on " The Hornet's Nest," a talk by Borwick on " Local Birds," one on " Sea Birds " by Gregory, and a talk on Fungi by Mr. Effron. For the first meeting members were asked to bring samples of pond water for observation under the microscope. The few who attended found the smaller forms of life varied and interesting. Mr. Effron illustrated his talk with a variety of fungi collected from the Sheffield area. The talks on birds were attended only by boys who have a keen interest in various aspects of bird life. " The Hornet's Nest attracted the largest gathering of the term. It may be that more people would attend if more coloured films were shown.

D. F. W.

Junior Astronomical Society.

We much regret that Mr. Vernon has had to relinquish the Presidency of our society owing to pressure of other work, and we wish to thank him for his manifold services and hope that he will not entirely forget us in his " retirement." The majority of our activities this term have been conducted by members: we have, in mind, traversed the Solar System. and hope to range further afield next term. Mr. Vernon opened the series of talks with a general introduction to astronomy for the benefit of newcomers, of whom we were pleased to see a large number. Whaley followed with a clear description of the Outer Planets. Singleton was the first to introduce illustration to his talk entitled " The Inner Planets and Mars." Davidson came down to earth (almost) with a description of the Moon, which led to a discussion of the theories on the formation of the satellite. Billington's talk on the Sun was extremely well illustrated and included something original. Finally the Society refused to turn its back on mystery and imagination by its rejection of the motion " That this House believes in the impossibility of life elsewhere in the Universe."

B. C. A.

Junior History Society.

Our first meeting was held on September 21st. when the officials elected were N. D. Worswick, Secretary, and B. D. Needham. Treasurer. On October 5th, Mr. J. Barwick, from the City Museum, gave a very interesting talk on Roman Sheffield. He very kindly brought along some exhibits for us to examine. Our first November meeting was cancelled because the speaker, J. Miller, was ill, but we hope to have his lecture next term. On November 23rd. the film " The Beginning of History" was shown. This film was open to non-members of the Society, and w-e had a large attendance of 71 boys. The final meeting for the Christmas Term was held on December 7th, when three short talks were given: by B. D. Needham on Tudor Britain. D. R. Bentley on Imperial Rome, and D. E. Rodgers on Hardwick Hall. We have full and extensive plans for next term and we hope to obtain more members and greater enthusiasm.

N. D. W.

Junior Scientific Society

On October 12, Mr. Mace and Mr. Mackay gave some demonstrations of unusual experiments which included the lighting of a match by the radiant heat from a car headlamp bulb, the use of thermostats to produce intermittent lighting, the explosion of coal-gas-air mixtures in long tubes, the burning air in coal gas, and the explosive oxidation of ammonia. The coloured lights and varied noises proved very attractive. The second meeting was held on December 14, when Mr. Mackay gave a lecture on Electric Lighting. The first electric lights were troublesome, costly and inefficient, and it was shown in the lecture that, by gradual improvement of detail, electricity could now be used in a great number of reliable appliances to produce light of the most varied character.

G. M.

Senior Music Club

At the first meeting of the revived Music Club a committee of ten was elected, those from the senior section being R. U. Watson, J. L. Madden, C. E. Nicholson and J. N. Shillito, to be concerned respectively with Piano, Instrumental, Vocal, and Recorded music. Concerts for both senior and junior sections were arranged by the President, P. J. Swinburn, and Publicity was placed in the hands of J. D. Rolfe. The response to requests for performers was, from the Senior School at least, rather poor at first, but a few concerts were given, thanks mainly to the keenness of a few. Gramophone concerts, however, have provided more varied fare ranging from opera to American folk songs, and the last two programmes of the term consisted appropriately of Menotti's Christmas opera " Amahl and the Night Visitors," presented by Mr. Barnes, to whom we owe our grateful thanks for help throughout the term. During the coming term it would be gratifying to see more boys offering to give up an occasional lunch-hour for the pleasure of their fellows and at the same time developing their musical ability to the benefit of themselves and their listeners.

P. J. S.

Junior Music Club

The following officials were elected in the junior section: C. J. Barnes (Singing), J. D. Cartwright (Piano), J. G. McNaught (Instrumental) and J. G. Robinson (Recorded music). Several concerts of each type were given, and those who performed, loaned records, or introduced programmes are heartily thanked, as is Mr. Barnes, for playing back a great deal of the School's 1954 performance of " Messiah," which is preserved on tape. Both presentations of this were well attended by avid score-readers. The "live " concerts were not, however, so well patronised. A number of potential musicians proffered their services. Most of these were pianists, though notable performances were also given by violinists, flautists, and singers. We hope to achieve a more balanced programme next term.

J. D. C.

Fives

For the first time in many years inter-school matches have been arranged and it is hoped that the experience thereby gained will do much to improve the standard of play so that it may eventually match the enthusiasm for the game which is evident throughout the school.

P. D. A.

RESULTS

v. Staff (Home) School won 7-5.
v. R. Vague's O.E. team (Home) School drew 6 all.
v. Buxton College (Home) School lost 12-0.
v. Buxton College (Away) School lost 12--0.

Scouting

" A " TROOP

A SUCCESSFUL Summer Camp was held in the Yorkshire Dales at Threshfield, near Grassington; the weather was perfect for camping. We welcome John Sharpe. Peter Griffith, Stephen Broomhead and Peter Hawkesley into the Troop and wish them all success in Scouting. Our Troop Leader, H. S. Simpson, has gained his Bushman's Thong and has become a Queen's Scout, for which he receives our heartiest congratulations. L. P. Wilkinson and J. Sewell have become First Class Scouts: congratulations to them too. The Parents' Committee has given the Troop much valuable support by holding a Whist Drive and Jumble Sale. The Troop entertained parents to a Parent-Scout Social at the end of term. All these events were well supported and enjoyed.

"B " TROOP

WE look back on a very successful and enjoyable term. Eleven recruits have joined us and are well settled in the Troop, which now consists of five Patrols. This term we have been without our invaluable A.S.M., D. A. Elliott: we wish him every success in his University career.

The first event of note was the Telegraph Trophy camping competition at Hesley Wood, for which four of our five Patrols entered. We' congratulate the Peewits under P/L R. Gilbert, who were placed second. Half of the Patrol were new recruits at their first camp. Three First Class badges have been gained, and several more are on the way. A Parents' Party was held on December 2nd and was well attended. We hope that the Parents enjoyed themselves and that they will continue to support the activities of the Parents' Committee. The Seniors continue to flourish and are busy converting a new Den. The usual Christmas Party was held and was very enjoyable, despite the iced orangeade on a night when the temperature was about -10°! The Den becomes more habitable as time goes on: we now have new windows and a new sink, and our thanks are due to Mr. Surguy for fixing, and giving, the new tap.

We look forward to next year and the camping it will bring. Three camps are planned one for P/Ls and Seconds at Easter, and the usual Troop Camps at Whitsun and in the Summer.

J. W. H.

 " B " TROOP SUMMER CAMP

Although the S.M. was unable to be present, camp was held as usual during the first two weeks of the holiday near Megavissey in Cornwall. Twenty-six members, led by A.S.M. D. Elliott, assisted by L. R. Cliffe, a notorious member of the Troop until his elevation to _Nottingham University, ventured south-westwards (possibly dangerous because " C " Troop were also in the vicinity). Inspections were punctual and efficient, meals were, on the whole, well cooked, and leisure time was crammed with activity. The patrol competition was a keen affair narrowly won by the Curlews under P/L Jack Sant, who beat the Peewits by 31 points. Bathing was the principal activity; with the temperature regularly in the 70's and occasionally in the 80's this was not surprising. Sunburn was the major enemy of the camp (apart from bullocks). Several enjoyable days were spent in the neighbouring Cornish Towns - Megavissey, St. Austell and Newquay. Eight scouts ventured on 1st Class hikes (resulting in blisters of varying sizes and colours). Camp Sports were fought out in a temperature of 80° and were won by the Peewits. Four of the Troop spent an afternoon haymaking for the farmer. Thanks to the weather, the camp had been a success; parents' doubts had been removed (with one exception who received no news at all). The visiting D.C. was most impressed with the site (the Troop was at Church when he arrived) and even " Willy " had never seen anything like it before. The farmer remarked that the Troop was the most courteous crowd of boys ever to have camped on his land-whatever passengers on the Fulwood or Circular buses may think! Our one regret was that five of the Troop were unable to be present owing to a clash with parents' holidays. Six years ago, every boy used to attend every camp. We hope that this year the weather will again be favourable and that all the Troop will attend Summer Camp even if they cannot manage to go to Whit Camp.

D. A. E.

"C " TROOP

SUMMER Camp at Trefusis, Cornwall, -was a most enjoyable fortnight on a new type of site in perfect weather. We shall long remember our host, Commander Trefusis, the ideal camp-fire site, the brilliant new camp song, the expedition to explore the cave and secret passage from the shore to Trefusis (we guess that one day more than one of us will return to do this properly), Mylor Church with its fascinating history, comic inscriptions and genial vicar (surely the best camp view " most of us can remember!), and that mad Wednesday evening when for at least half an hour everyone hurled their ..............................................................

The Squirrel Patrol won the competition and proved that they were a very good camping patrol indeed by going on to win the "Sheffield Telegraph" Trophy at the beginning of the Christmas Term. Congratulations to them and to P/L Peter Hubbard.

During the last week of the Summer holidays a quite unique '` thing'" entitled The Engineer's Thumb took place. Blindfolded in cars, four pairs of Scouts were taken to a remote moorland spot seven miles from the nearest telephone box to camp under backwoods conditions in the neighbourhood of a mysteriously inhabited derelict farm. At the end of an exciting and eventful three days, presentation woggles were awarded to the winning pair, Martin Williams and Barry Redfearn.

Members of the Troop have obtained a Queen's Scout and 6 First Class badges, and others are on the way. Troop and Patrol meetings have been held regularly, but we should like to see the Den used more on week-nights. Our recruits-all 13 of them-are doing well, and we should like them all to have gained their Second Class by summer camp. The Troop continues in the New Year under new P/Ls. They have a fine tradition behind them, which presents an example and an incentive. Our thanks are due to A.S.M. Alan Copley and Deep Sea Rover " Archie " Skelton for their help at Trefusis, to Rover Tony Guenault for his help in Cornwall and on other occasions, to the inventive -Michael Gagan for his help in all directions, to the retiring Patrol Leaders and odd people like D. Edwards, Mr. Milligan and the makers of a certain brand of petrol for moulding and sustaining the Troop's distinctive ethos.

S. M.

A Cambridge Letter

SIR,

One of the freshman's first impressions of Cambridge is the extraordinary amount that people eat, drink, and are merry, in the extravagant, energetic, eccentric way that people here seem to do all three of these things. And nowhere do you see this better displayed than at the tea-party-the perennial tea-party, complete with toasted crumpets and butter if You're lucky, and with sliced bread, margarine and marmalade if you're not. Of course the thing to do, and which the intelligent freshman does, is to get yourself invited out to tea every day for the first month until you are " settled in." This has many advantages: you learn how tea-parties are conducted, you have an excuse and an opportunity to look up all the ex-acquaintances thatcourtesy requires and see if they are still worth knowing after two or more years; and you save money. But by the end of the month you have built up a formidable list of avenging Harpies waiting to descend on you, whom you are obliged at last to invite to tea at your place, and whom you know darn well intend to fast for a week before they come. They arrive separately or as a composite shower, troop in and distribute themselves about the floor and are amazingly but amusingly rude to everyone in general, whilst the frantic host plies the tea-pot and toasting fork with an ambidexterosity worthy of an octopus. One notorious red-haired regular at these functions insists on regarding them primarily as a contest in consumption, and, to give him credit. I have not yet seen him beaten or out-eaten. The O.E.s here may be in a parlous condition morally, mentally and financially, indeed they are, but under-nourished they will never be.

Yours sincerely,

CLASSICUS.

THE CAR

Away in the distance a faint hum is heard. And a bird,
Looking for worms,
Stops, listens, cries;
And swiftly away it flies.

The noise grows louder.
A red noise;
A flock of rooks caw,
And then, screaming, rise into the air.
A rabbit in the grass stares
And scampers away.
The snarl comes nearer.

A savage snarl,
And a car
Scowls at the road, Screeching defiance
In a mad desire for speed.
The wheels shrill
And the car has gone.

The rooks return to the trees, grumbling;
The bird taps on the ground Impatient for a worm;
And the rabbit, half wondering,
Munches its leaf.

J. P. ABRAHAMS.

Oxford Letter

So much has been going on at Oxford in 1955 that, pondering what to report, we certainly have no space for aiming digs at Cambridge. exercising various latinisms, and other typical effects.

A certain form of amiable independence should somehow be contrived at Oxford: in this respect we have noted the efforts of divers Old Edwardians. Mr. Pearce possesses an enigmatic coffee-house charm: he listens, strokes his beard and says what is fitting. Mr. Thornton has convinced us that table tennis is a gentleman's sport, and will shortly prove that it originated in ancient Persia. Serious endeavour, for which we record congratulations, has seen Messrs. Fletcher and Marshall in successive Decembers at Wembley, although the latter has come to regard Soccer, along with all mental processes, in terms of an Eternal Test. Mr. Searle Barnes no longer rolls a crafty wood in New College gardens; Mr. Charles has taken over and runs a Hop-Scotch League with tremendous success, considering the College traditions. Little is seen of Mr. Jones: he has evidently refused to be disorganised by the helter-skelter of Oxford life. We are holding a flag-day for Mr. Brown, who, as a well known Club Man, needs the publicity as much as the money. Mr. Adsetts, before departing, unfortunately embroiled Mr. Drake in the mesh of this sickeningly nouveau " pastime of Lacrosse: as the new President of the Seventh Club we bear with him. Regrettably a certain catchy note of mystery and intrigue has dissolved with Mr. Bingham's going: the quieter corners of Oxford are no longer surprised by his resonant subtlety.

We hasten to add that any idiosyncrasies are not at the expense of academic striving on our part, and anyhow one never knows what a certain June madness will produce. Mr. Millward for example was visited: Mr. MacBeth didn't need outside help and strolled off with a First.

Finally we hope this year's Annual Dinner will be as successful as the last one, when Mr. Clapton and Dr. Barton were guests. Miss Knight we hope will fill up her punting card for the Summer. Inevitably some more oddities will be revealed to the credit of Old Edwardians not mentioned.

KENWOOD.

Old Edwardians Association

 CRICKET CLUB SEASON 1955

IT must be many years since we have been favoured with such good weather for our cricket as in 1955. The number of fixtures which were cancelled or abandoned is scarcely worth mentioning. It is also quite a pleasant change to be able to report that we finished the season financially " on the right side " and without that familiar last line on our balance sheet showing " amount owing to Treasurer."

Both teams had fairly successful seasons, each winning more matches than were lost, and the victories in our evening fixtures being equally shared with our opponents. The First XI began the season indifferently and indeed prior to August only 4 matches had been won out of 16 played. However, from that date the team really struck its true form and went through the remaining 8 matches without defeat. These included two notable victories over Buxton 1st XI and Darley Dale 1st XI on successive Saturdays. This being the first time ever that the latter club had been beaten by the O.E.

It is not usual in these reports to mention individuals, but it is felt that the bowling of H. E. Pearson should not be passed over without mention. On a hard, true wicket, with the opposing batsmen endeavouring to force a draw, he took 8 wickets for 16 runs, and backed up by some excellent fielding from the remainder of the team, he gave us a victory which will long be remembered.

The Second XI once again had a full fixture list and report a very enjoyable season. On too many occasions, however, it proved necessary to import players from outside the O.E.A. to field a full team. The Club at the end of the season has lost several regular members and is at the moment very short of players. It is hoped that any members of the Association. and any boys still at School, who are at all interested in playing for us will give their names to the Secretary: some enjoyable cricket will be assured for them. Our thanks are once again due to the officers of the Club and in particular to our hard - working Secretary, Howard Woodcock. For the past eight years he has arranged all our fixtures and made most of our arrangements so efficiently that it is perhaps hardly realised by the members how much they are in his debt. We look forward to next season. with the hope that once again we shall be kindly favoured by the elements.

   

1ST XI

     

Batting Averages (qualification 7innings)

 
     

Highest

     

Inn.

N.O.

Score

Runs

Ave.

Turner, D.

12

3

59

196

21.8

 

Wise, G.

16

 

48

253

15.8

 

Allsop, E.

18

3

50 n.

237

15.8

 

Pearson, W.

11

2

28

124

13.7

 

Horn, G.

16

4

27n.

136

11.3

 

White, A.        

11

2

18

97

10.7

 

Woodcock, G. H.

14

 

48

148

10.5

 

Sivil, E.            

14

1

53n.

130

10.0

 

Kay, D .             ..

8

1

40

68

9.7

 

Price, J.

12

 

36

112

9.3

 

Gilpin, D.         

7

3

15

25

6.2

 

Bowling Averages (qualification 50 overs).

0.

M.

R.

Wkts.

Ave.

Allsop, E.

224

55

719

67

10.7

Pearson, W.

92.2

17

227

21

10.8

Nicholson, G.

85

19

209

16

13.0

Turner, D.

59

13

209

16

13.0

Armytage, D.

113.5

26

285

21

13.6

Kay, D.  

98.2

30

221

16

13.8

Catches: Gilpin 9, Dearden 7, Kay 7, Turner 7.

Total runs scored by O.E.C.C .

2,169

Total runs scored by opponents

2,264

Total wickets taken by O.E.C.C.

189

Total wickets taken by opponents 162

Matches Won 10, Lost 8, Drawn 5, Cancelled or abandoned 3.

Runs per wicket scored by O.E.C.

13.5

Runs per wicket scored by opponents

12.0

SOCCER CLUB

The Soccer Club is experiencing a change of fortunes, happily for the second team which, after struggling for a few seasons to hold its own in Division II of the South Yorkshire Amateur League is now holding a leading position in Division III. Meanwhile the first team has relinquished its place as runners up to the League Champions and is at present endeavouring to recapture the form of last season and to fill the vacancies caused by National Service calls and injuries.

After experimenting with positional changes, Wingfield, this year's Captain, has now established a team which has been strengthened by the return from the Forces of Tebbett and Illingworth and by the inclusion of Needham and Grantham promoted from the second team. The team met with certain successes in the Junior Cup Competition, but found that Woodhouse were rather too strong as opposition in the third round. It was unfortunate that the playing conditions for the School game on December 10th were so difficult, conditions which perhaps favoured the Old Boys with the School playing the type of football which would have met with greater success on a drier day.

 The Second Team appears to have embarked on the set purpose of getting back to Division II in the shortest possible time, and L. May, captain again this season, must be greatly encouraged by the results which have been achieved so far and by the large number of goals scored. The game against the School 2nd XI early in the season was lost to a better and fitter side and must serve as a warning to the first team for a future occasion.

South Yorkshire Amateur League

Results up to and including December 17th, 1955.

 

P

W

L

D

F

A

1st Team

11

6

5

 

27

25

2nd Team

13

10

3

 

57

26

Cross-Country

A SERIES of early victories concealed the fact that the Senior team is weaker than last year; consequently three defeats in three weeks were rather upsetting. Although winning times have been on the whole better than those of last season, packing has been poor and very often a lack of concerted effort from the tail has confounded the exertions of the leaders.

The team has consisted of J. N. Shillito (Captain), J. M. Timperley, P. Jackson (Secretary), G. Bradshaw, M. D. Rowland, M. Gould, R. Darwin, J. D. Brownhill, P. H. Barker. Among the Junior team, Sheasby (Captain) has set a consistently good performance. Tomlinson and Neilson have also run well. The team has been selected from: Sheasby, Tomlinson, Neilson, Guite, A. S. Pope, J. D. Pope, G. N. Brothers, Boyd.

If we have a growth of team spirit and more training, our prospects may be brighter in the Trophy races next term. Our thanks are due to Mr. Kopcke, Mr. Sinclair and Mr. Chalmers for taking some of our matches, and to Mr. Collins for his guardianship, counsel and maltesers.

J. N. S.

I would like to thank Shillito for his help this term. He has settled into his captaincy well. Jackson and Timperley have been invaluable to the team and I am sure we shall be able to pull together so that our achievements in the coming term will be respectable.

D. C.

Football

 1ST XI

IN bare figures the XI does not seem to have enjoyed a very successful season so far. The results, however, in no way do justice to a team which, with two exceptions, has always given a commendable performance. It was expected at the beginning of the season that the team would have to struggle hard since only three members had consistently played in 1st XI football before. Of these old-timers Shipton has been out of action through injury since the second game, while Rutledge has unfortunately had to miss several games also through injury. Add to this the fact that our opponents have invariably had the run of the ball, a factor so necessary for success in any game, and it is plain to see that this inexperienced team has so far not enjoyed the best of luck.

The defence on the whole has played soundly but is prone to sudden lapses. Hill has proved a very agile goalkeeper, and has made few mistakes. He is very safe in the air, but is not so sure with ground shots. Bradshaw was forced to move from centre-half to full-back, and he has been partnered by Longden. They have always tried to play constructively and on the whole have covered soundly, but both tend to be slow on the turn, Bradshaw in particular trying to do a dazzling dribble before clearing! Rutledge and Cooper have shared the centre-half position and have both proved very reliable defenders, their headwork being an outstanding feature of their play. Challenger and Kent have been the regular wing-halves and have usually managed to give the forwards a good supply of the ball. Kent is the cooler and more constructive player, but Challenger lacks nothing in energy. Hague has proved a very capable deputy in Kent's absence.

The forwards have been brilliantly led by Farnell, whom we congratulate on his selection for Yorkshire G.S.F.A. XI, and on the award of full 1st XI colours. Powell and Youle have usually been inside forwards, but they have been on the whole disappointing as much was expected from them; both have been brilliant on their day. Evison was included in the later games; he has played successfully and should develop into a very shrewd inside forward. His understanding with Newsum on the wing has been shown to good effect. The wing positions have as usual provided several problems. Allen and Sallis opened the season, but both lost form. White came in on the left wing and through his fine ball-play has shown himself to be a promising player; he must, however, not be frightened of huge full-backs. Howarth succeeded Allen on the right, and although very unselfish and always trying to co-operate with the other forwards, he lacks directness. Newsum has had perhaps most success on the right wing.

The team has always played superb approach football. The ball has been kept on the ground, well timed passes have been made, but success just would not come. Criticisms of the team include a slow defence which could benefit by closer marking and more first-time clearances, more shooting power on the part of the wing forwards, the realisation that an opponent is better beaten by a pass than by a dribble, and better employment of more direct football preventing the opposing defence from covering up. The team spirit has been high and there is no doubt that in spite of its many disappointments the young team has always given of its best. With a determined effort next term the record of the team can be vastly improved.

J. D. B.

RESULTS

v. The Staff    

(H)

Lost

3-4

v. J. B. Browns XI  

(H)

Won

5-3

v. City G.S.    

(A)

Won

6-2

v. Chesterfield G.S.    

(H)

Lost

0-6

v. Q. Elizabeth G.S., Mansfield

(A)

Drawn

3-3

v. High Storrs G.S.    

(H)

Lost

2-3

v. Huddersfield Amateurs

(A)

Drawn

3-3

v. Nottingham University  

(H)

Lost

1-5

v. Bootham School    

(A)

Won

4-3

v. Mexborough G.S.    

(H)

Lost

2-3

v. Woodhouse G.S.    

(A)

Lost

1-4

v. Manchester G.S.    

(H)

Lost

1-4

v. Huddersfield Amateurs  

(H)

Won

6-1

v. Nottingham University

(A)

Won

6-1

v. Old Edwardians    

(H)

Lost

1-6

v. Ecclesfield G.S.  

(H)

Lost

6-9

Leading Goal Scorers: Farnell 22, Evison 9, Powell 6.

SECOND XI

WE can record a very successful first half of the season. Out of a total of fourteen matches, eleven were won and three drawn. At the beginning of term there was no difficulty in finding players for there seemed to be a wealth of suitable material in the Senior School and the problem of finding the best combination was soon solved as convincing wins followed close upon one another. Of course, modifications have had to be made to meet the 1st XI requirements, but on the whole we have been able to field the same side throughout the term. There has been considerable strength in defence which has proved to be a vital factor. If the forwards can make effective use of every opportunity and increase their speed in attack, then I feel confident that a further term of success awaits us. I do not intend to single out any player for especial mention, for it has been upon team work alone that our fortunes have depended, and to be able to record sixty goals scored and twenty-one conceded is ample proof.

It is worthy of note that the team's versatile nature is not confined to the playing-field; a certain talent for " song and dance " has been shown by such exponents as Buchan, amongst the many dressing-room artists. As Captain, Watkinson is to be congratulated upon the team's success which is due, in no small part, to his inspiration and example both in defence and attack.

B. G. H. G.

RESULTS:

c. Old Edwardians  

  Won

1-0

v. City G.S.

Won

11-0

v. Chesterfield G.S.

  Won

4-1

v. Staveley G.S. 1st XI  

  Won

2-0

v. Mansfield G.S.  

Won

6-3

v. High Storrs G.S.    

Won

4-2

v. Huddersfield Amateurs  

Won

6-1

v. Bootham School  

Won

4-2

v. Mexborough G.S.    

Won

6-3

v. Woodhouse G.S.    

Won

6-1

r. Manchester G.S.    

  Won

5-3

v. Huddersfield Amateurs  

Drawn

1-1

v. Nether Edge G.S. 1st XI

Drawn

2-2

v. Ecclesfield G.S.    

Drawn 2-2

Goal-scorers: Evison 14, Allen 12, Sallis 8, Newsum 7, White 4, Howarth 3, Walton 3, Buchan 2, Bailey 2, Downes 1, Rutledge 1, Pike 1.

THIRD XI

THE fortunes of the team have been rather mixed in the first part of the season; the early matches brought encouraging victories but more recently the team has fared rather badly, although it must be added that it has been necessary to supply several players to the senior sides. The greatest weakness so far has been a tendency towards slowness in the defence, which has led to goals being conceded at vital moments in several games, but otherwise the defence has worked hard and developed into a useful combination. It has not been easy to build up a forceful attack with calls being made from time to time upon certain key players, and we have particularly lacked a centre-forward who could convert many of the good moves made by the team into a larger tally of goals.

The team, however, has enjoyed its football which it plays with enthusiasm under the leadership of Baxter, and it has given an opportunity for boys to be promoted from House games and given experience of School matches. This seems to be a most valuable function of a 3rd XI, whatever the results of the games played.

T. K. R.

RESULTS:

v. Central Technical Sch.

(A)

Won

4-2

v. Owler Lane    

(H)

Won

4-2

v. Marlcliffe Sch.    

(H)

Won

6-3

v. Training College ..  

(H)

Lost

2-4

v. Bents Green Methodist Sch .

(H)

Won

8-3

v. Greystones Sch.

(H)

Lost

2-5

v. Brunswick Trinity Methodist

(A)

Drawn

2-2

v. Manchester G.S. 3rd XI  

(H)

Drawn

3-3

v. Owler Lane Sch.    

(A)

Lost

0-4

v. Crosspool Corinthians  

(H)

Lost

1-2

v. Eckington G.S. 2nd XI  

(H)

Lost

1-2

Played 11, Won 4, Drawn 2, Lost 5, Goals: For 33, Against 32.

UNDER 15 XI

THE results speak for themselves. This has been by far the most effective team in recent years. The football produced has been of a very high standard, and but for some rather erratic shooting the results would have been even more devastating. A great deal of the credit must go to the half-backs and inside forwards who have completely dominated the midfield play. In goal Henderson has gained confidence with every game and is developing into a very sound keeper. The full-backs, Hancock and Davis, are steady, but tend to play rather square. They do use the ball intelligently and have rarely had recourse to wild kicking. At wing half Lord and Powell have taken their full part both in defence and attack. They tackle hard and feed their forwards cleverly. Crowson has been a tower of strength in the defence and has used his height and speed to full advantage. He is not purely a defensive player but he must curb his eagerness and leave scoring to the forwards. The wingers Dalton and Dakin have shown commendable dash and have shot accurately and often. Dalton falls too often into the offside trap. Findlay at inside left has provided the chief link between defence and attack, whereas Andrew, the other inside forward, has displayed excellent ball-control and distribution. Gilbert is a bustling centre-forward. I should like to see him shoot more often, more quickly and more accurately. The team has been adequately served by Manterfield and Board as reserves. Hancock is a strong and efficient captain, but I should like to see him clamp down more quickly on some of the fiddling -which occurs. The success of this team augurs well for the future of the School's football.

D. J. W., B. D.

RESULTS

v. Rowlinson Sch.

 (H)

Won

7-0

v. Central Technical Sch.

(H)

Won

11-1

v. City Boys

 (A)

Won

4-2

v. Chesterfield G.S.

(A)

Won

4-1

v. High Storrs G.S.

(A)

Won

1-0

v. Southey Green Sch.

(H)

Won

 6-0

v. Ecclesfield G.S.

(H)

Drawn

2-2

v. Mexborough G.S.

(A)

Won

5-0

v. Manchester G.S.

(A)

Won

7-0

v. Brunswick Trinity

(H)

Won

14-0

v. Brunswick Trinity

(A)

Won

22--0

Goals: For 83, Against 6.

Goal-scorers: Gilbert, Andrew 16, Lord 12, Findlay 11, Dakin, Dalton 9, Crowson 6, Board, Davis, Hancock. Manterfield.

UNDER 14 XI

THE season has, as vet, not been very successful in this section. The term started with a number of heavy defeats, but after a number of changes in personnel and positions a greater measure of success has been obtained. There is no lack of enthusiasm and hard work by the team and there have been occasions when, with a little more luck, decisions might have been reversed.

The members of the team have applied themselves well and have improved their game, but the chief failing is a lack of a striking power in the attack. They must learn to move the ball more quickly and in a less obvious direction if they are to score goals. The defenders have, for the most part, played steadily and competently but are often handicapped by their lack of inches. Dixon has been a good captain, handling his team well on the field and always showing keen interest and willingness to experiment.

J. C. H.

RESULTS

v. Rowlinson Sch.

(A)

Lost

11-1

v. City G.S.

(A)

Lost

4-3

v. Owler Lane Sch.

(H)

Lost

3-I

v. Chesterfield G.S.

(A)

Lost

6-3

v. Marlcliffe Sch.

(A)

Won

5-2

v. High Storrs G.S.

(H)

Lost

3-1

v. Hunter's Bar Sch.

(H)

Won

7-1

v. Ecclesfield G.S.

(A)

Won

2-0

v. Mexborough G.S.

(H)

Won

3-1

v. Manchester G.S.

(H)

Drawn

0--0

v. Owler Lane  

(A)

Lost

10-0

v. Nether Edge G.S.

(A)

Won

3-0

(abandoned at half-time)

v. Eckington G.S.

 (H)

Lost

3-1

Played 13. Won 5, Lost 7, Drawn 1. Goals For 30. Against 44.

Scorers: Hudson 8, Needham 6, Cottingham 3. Swift 2, Tranmer 2. Pike 2. Ellis, Smith. Pinder. Newton 1.

UNDER 13 XI

The term has proved extremely discouraging fixtures have been few and far between, but a regular training period has been started and this has been profitable, judging by results: played 5. won 3, drawn 1, lost 1.

After a 1-1 draw with High Storrs (away) the team were decisive victors against De La Salle College (home) by 5 goals to nil. Here the play of the defence in particular was extremely promising, the backs Jenkinson and Wileman marking intelligently and tackling hard. But hopes of maintaining an unbeaten record were dashed by Firth Park at Castle Dyke in the most exciting game of the term. After leading four times the School lost dejectedly in the closing minutes by 4 goals to 5. This was the first time the defence had been under pressure and, surprisingly, lax marking against fast wingers was the cause of defeat. It seemed that this was to be repeated at Manchester when, after five minutes, the School were 2-0 down-and this against ten men! However, the fine wing play of Newton, Tranmer and Pike forced our opponents to defend for the rest of the game, which was von 8-3. Here the principal weaknesses seemed to be a tendency to crowd into the centre and a reluctance to . shoot hard, often and quickly. Finally in a second match with High Storrs (away) the team was winning 4-2 when the game was abandoned after half-time.

The team has been represented by - Buckle Wileman, Jenkinson; Ridgway, Nosowski, Tranmer (Captain): Bennett, Parker, Cottingham, Pike. Newton, Rowbotham, Woolhouse. Hirst.

B. C. A.

Rugby

RUGGER has now entered its fifth season, and prospects for the future are brighter than ever. The 1st XV, after a shaky start against the Old Boys XV, have won 4 of the 8 matches so far played, the most satisfactory being the 23-9 defeat of Mount St. Mary's. Under the skilful captaincy of Wellings and with everybody in the team determined to make ground if possible, coupled with an increasing sense of the importance of opening up the game when in attack, we have been able to cross the line to the tune of 91 points. But for the failure of the three-quarters to make sure of their man every time, and slowness to corner-flag on the part of the forwards, this figure would have been sufficient to give us victory in almost every match.

The forwards ably led by Roebuck have proved very penetrating in attack and openings made by the "back row" have been eagerly followed up, Vickers being a conspicuous forward in these rushes, and Beynon as open-side wing forward playing an excellent spoiling game. The backs have also made some good openings, with the two centres and Dean, an ever-improving scrum-half, often prominent. Perhaps next term the team's defence will be as good as its attack, and we may look forward to an even better record.

We would like to thank Mr. Harrison and Mr. Towers, whose coaching and unfailing support have made this improvement possible.

C. J. B.

For the Colts XV this has been a more successful term than their last, although there were only three recruits from the whole of the Fourth Year. This latter fact, coupled with the constant demands of the 1st XV meant that on no occasion have we been able to turn out a team at full strength in a school game.

As usual, we have shown our main strength amongst the forwards during loose play, but tardiness in heeling and slow service from the base of the scrum have meant that the back division has rarely been able to function with speed and penetration. The strength of the back division lay in the right flank and this was quickly spotted by opponents, who marked it keenly; thus preventing attacks from developing since they had little or nothing to fear from the left wing. The trouble has been that those boys who showed promise as backs have, only too often, failed to come up to standard in school games. However, positioning, kicking and tackling at full-back have been very adequate and many attacking moves have originated from that position in recent games. The team as a whole has fallen on the ball very well, but shown a marked reluctance to tackle and pass. We believe that the general standard has risen this term, and this was borne out by the further decreased deficit in the game against Worksop College.

E.R.W.

SENIOR GAMES

Congratulation rather than criticism is the keynote of this term's report, for Soccer, Rugger, and Running have all flourished. Indeed, not content with our usual programme, Fives and Badminton have also been included.

Firstly there is praise for whole level of Soccer throughout the School; then praise for the thoughtful scheming play in the House League; and lastly praise for the hack and thrust of the Knock-out competition. Everyone, boys and masters included, has really expressed delight with the competitions, and the splendid games during this term.

The League has one more round to run, though this would appear to be an unnecessary labour as Haddon are quite securely placed at the head of the table. The great feature of the table is the appearance of Sherwood as a football power; unbeaten in their last four games, they really have improved. The Knock-out competition has never been more hotly contested, two games going into extra time, and the standard of football being excellent. Welbeck, without Youle, owing to examination commitments, fell to Haddon 5--3 after extra time; a worthy game. Sherwood gave Wentworth a severe fright but lost 2-1.

What of our other miserable mortals? They run and play Rugger; and they are doing well, as records in other parts of this Magazine will show. Particularly commendable is their spirit! When lesser men crouch and shiver under a weather-beaten balcony, one blast of the whistle sends the tenacious Rugger fans-dare we say fanatics?-ploughing their way to Castle Dyke to battle with each other and the elements. An excellent example indeed!

And so, you Seniors, can this be your standard for next term? Run, jump and throw with equal determination, and maintain the School's high tradition.

G. I.

SENIOR LEAGUE

 

P

W

D

L

F

A

Pts

 

1. Haddon

6

4

2

0

20

8

10

2. Sherwood

6

4

0

2

19

10

8

2. Chatsworth  

6

3

2

1

25

20

8

4. J Lynwood

6

3

1

2

27

19

7

4. Welbeck

6

3

1

2

18

21

7

6. Arundel

6

2

1

3

15

16

5

7. Wentworth  

6

1

1

4

16

24

3

8. Clumber

6

0

0

6

8

32

0

 

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL GAMES

Until the last fortnight of term we were lucky in having the ground in excellent condition and were able to make good progress with the League competition; indications are that Haddon will probably continue a very long run as champions in this section. The "let" system has been continued and has worked quite successfully, but the response to the invitation to try Rugby football has been rather disappointing. We should like at least another twenty boys to try the game; boys who do not particularly enjoy their football should be more willing to try the change.

J. C. H.

JUNIOR GAMES

With every Thursday fine, or at least not too bad for football, it has been a wonderful term for the new entry. The general impression is that the quality of football is above average, with a few outstanding boys who will be heard of in School teams for many years to come. The League games were keenly contested, and produced two remarkably good teams from Lynwood and Wentworth. In the final match they drew 2-2; but in the play-off Lynwood caught their opponents on an off-day and won decisively. Their tenacity and fighting spirit throughout the competition were worthily rewarded.

The 2nd XI competition was a walk-over for Arundel, as is shown by their goal record. They scored 66 times and conceded only three.

In a Form competition 2(1) and 1(1) each won all their matches and so are the champions of their respective years.

H. R. T.

JUNIOR LEAGUE

1st XI

P

W

D

L

Pts

1. Lynwood                 

7

6

1

0

13

1. Wentworth           

7

6

1

0

13

3. Haddon                 

7

4

1

2

9

3. Arundel        

7

4

1

2

9

5. Chatsworth          

7

3

0

4

6

4. Sherwood                  

7

2

0

5

4

7. Clumber                   

7

1

0

6

2

8. Welbeck              

7

0

0

7

0

Play-off: Lynwood 5, Wentworth 1;
Haddon 1,Arundel 1 (for 3rd place).

2ND XI

         

l. Arundel                     

7

7

0

0

14

2. Wentworth    

7

6

0

1

12

3. Clumber                  

7

4

1

2

9

4. Lynwood 

7

4

0

3

8

5. Haddon               

7

3

1

3

7

6. Chatsworth               

7

2

0

5

4

7. Welbeck        

7

1

0

6

2

8. Sherwood              

7

0

0

7

0

Notices

Contributions for THE MAGAZINE should be addressed to THE EDITOR, SCHOOL MAGAZINE, K.E.S.

All contributions should be written clearly in ink or typed, and must be signed with the writer's name, which will not necessarily be published.

The Editor will be glad to be kept informed of the doings of O.E.'s-especially those in distant parts of the world-in order that THE MAGAZINE may form a link between them and the School.

THE MAGAZINE can be supplied to any other than present members of the School for a subscription of 5J- a year, post free. Subscriptions in advance for any number of years should be sent to THE HON. SECRETARY, THE MAGAZINE, KING EDWARD VII SCHOOL, SHEFFIELD, 10.

OLD EDWARDIANS' ASSOCIATION.-Hon. Secretary, E. W. SIVIL, 67 Slayleigh Lane, Sheffield, 10.

House Notes

 ARUNDEL

The term opened promisingly, Arundel having four members among the Prefects, including A. J. Pinion, our House Captain, who is also Vice Head Prefect. The Senior Football League team soon lost R. J. Kent, who became a regular member of the School 1st XI, and possibly as a result we lost our first two games. Gradually a loose team was welded into a reasonably co-ordinated whole, and a series of improved results followed. The Knock-out was lost by the odd goal in seven, after we had forced extra time against a strong Haddon team. Lower down the School, the Junior 2nd XI continued a now firm tradition by winning all seven matches and establishing the dazzling goal-tally of 66-3. Water Polo team has had a successful season, sustaining only one narrow defeat-from Clumber. Our thanks to the many junior members who have given regular support; this is an easy and always useful contribution to the House and is to be encouraged. Our best wishes to all four Arundel boys who made the trip down to Cambridge for examinations this month. Finally, we offer a hearty welcome to our new House Tutor, Mr. R. B. Chalmers.

CHATSWORTH

The most pleasing feature of the House's activities has been the noticeable reappearance of a previously dormant House spirit. Unfortunately our sporting record has not been particularly distinguished, but this has been largely due to the loss of many recognised and established members of the House. In the Senior Football League the strength of the House 1st XI has been considerably diminished by the demands of the School 1st XI, for which Farnell, Newsom, Sallis and Howarth have played; but in spite of this the team has done unexpectedly well to reach 3rd position in the League. In the Knock-out competition the team, strengthened by the inclusion of several School 1st XI players, was unfortunate to lose a keenly contested game with Welbeck by 2 goals to 1. In the other leagues the House teams have not met with outstanding success, and for this the defences must take the greater part of the blame, although in the case of the Middle School team there have not been enough games from which to gain a true impression of the team's ability. As with Football, our Swimming record has suffered with the loss of the majority of its best players, and several heavy defeats have been inflicted by stronger teams. In conclusion, we must congratulate B. Farnell on being selected to play for the Yorkshire Grammar Schools Soccer XI, offer our best wishes to C. M. N. Vere, who is leaving after having gained a Hastings Scholarship, and trust that next term the present House spirit will be allied to more concrete success.

CLUMBER

The House has had to rely on Swimming, a strong point for many years, for its achievements in a generally unproductive term. The Water Polo team, having recently beaten its nearest rivals Wentworth, is undefeated, and in a most favourable position for retaining the League trophy. By contrast the Football elevens have little success to record. The Knock-out saw the departure of Clumber in the first round, the Senior League table shows the House at the bottom, while the Juniors' record is little better. However, the Senior team this year is generally young and small and their record next year should be better. With three members of the School Cross Country team in the House we can hope for good results in this field next term, and should at least improve on last year's position. In conclusion, Clumber offers its congratulations to A. E. Hanwell on being awarded a Minor Scholarship in Natural Sciences at Cambridge.

HADDON

This term, Haddon has been undoubtedly most conspicuous on the Soccer field. The promise of the last few years has now come to fruition in a Senior XI that has won its way to the Knock-out Final and, with one game to play, holds first position in the League. We look with confidence to the outcome of these competitions. We congratulate the many members of Haddon who have played for School soccer teams this term; that so many should come from one House is probably a record. The Middle School XI, ably led by Powell, stands in a very strong position and seems likely to retain the trophy it won last year. The Juniors unfortunately were unable to maintain our traditional superiority, but finished a worthy third. The Water Polo team, despite the tireless energy of Hollingworth, has not gained any outstanding success, but it hopes for better results in the remainder of its matches. On the whole the term has been a successful one for us, and we look with confidence to the New Year.

LYNWOOD

We have seen both success and failure in Lynwood this term. In the Football Knock-out we were defeated 4-1 by Wentworth, but the Senior League team is well placed and in the running for the championship. Despite Stones's efforts, the Water Polo team has not lived up to its reputation. The success this year comes from our Juniors. The Junior 1st XI, ably captained by Parker and served by Nosowski, has won the Barton Shield. We extend our congratulations to our flourishing Juniors. The Middle School are in a middling position, but as so few of the matches have been played, it is difficult to foresee the result. The coming holiday gives us a short breathing space before the trials of the Lent Term, when we hope for continued success, expecting that every member will, as in the past, do his best. Finally, we should like to extend congratulations to our State Scholars, Spir and Downes, and to Spir and Humphries on being awarded a Major Scholarship and an Exhibition respectively at Oxford.

SHERWOOD

Although this term the achievement of the House have been but moderate, its academic capabilities are unparalleled. We must congratulate X. S. Waite and J. M. F. Gagan on obtaining State Scholarships, and Gagan and K. Jackson on receiving Hastings awards. The football team, under the able captaincy of Watkinson, climbed to second place in the League, and probably would have been higher had it not been for losing an early game before the team had properly settled down. In the Knock-out the team gained an easy victory over Clumber by seven goals to nil, but were unlucky to lose narrowly by two goals to one to Wentworth after playing' extra time. In Water Polo, though none of our players has achieved school team status, the team has held our more doughty opponents to many a keen struggle. With the Middle School there was little House football; set games were played on most Tuesdays. In the Junior School, although the House teams scored goals, the match goal averages were so high that the final results were not always in our favour. We hope, however, that in the New Year the position will be reversed and the Middle and Junior teams successfully follow the example set by the Senior team. Finally, we must say goodbye to I. W. Strachan, who leaves us at Christmas, and wish him every success in his proposed career in the R.A.F.

WELBECK

The Christmas term was an unsuccessful one for the House. However, the Knock-out team offered great resistance in the semi-final against Haddon and only lost after extra time. The Senior League team has had a moderate season. and it must be said that it has been sorely weakened owing to the fact that four of its members, Shipton, Longden, Hill and Youle, are all recognised members of the School 1st XI. The Middle School Soccer team has been very consistent but the Junior team has not won a match. One notable feature has been the continued improvement of the Water Polo team under Daglish's leadership. Finally, we hope that Shipton has fully recovered from his injury his services were greatly missed in the Knock-out.

WENTWORTH

Games must naturally take a major part in any House report, and fortunately this term has seen many successes come our way. The Knock-out XI has battled its way to the Final. to which we look forward with confidence. Rumours that Haddon is arranging a special holiday by the sea-side for its team members and oxygen and glucose tablets at half-time, have proved to be without foundation, but well may our opponents look forward with foreboding. The fighting qualities of the 1st XI were shown in the Semi-final when a 0-1 deficit at half-time was turned into a 2-1 victory with minutes to spare. The Senior League XI, ably captained by Walton, has recorded two 8-0 victories, but narrow defeats have spoiled their record. The Juniors, under Tranmer's leadership, have performed most creditably. finishing close seconds in both Leagues. The Middle School team has not had a good season. In School XIs, the House has been well represented; Bradshaw for the 1st XI. Walton and Bailey for the 2nd XI, Tyas, Jones. Beardshall and Walker for the 3rd XI, and Dixon and Tranmer for the U.14 XI. Water Polo is definitely our forte, and the team has had a consistently good season under Horsefield's enthusiastic captaincy. So far its only defeat was a narrow one at the hands of a strong Clumber team; ironically enough, that defeat stemmed from one of its smallest members, who, left unmarked, was able to give Clumber a two goal lead. Our Swimming prospects indeed look bright and we hope yet that our team may finish top of the League.