KING EDWARD VII SCHOOL MAGAZINE

VOL. XIII

WINTER, 1953-4

No. 10

 
CONTENTS

SCHOOL NOTES

169

SCHOOL SOCIETIES

179

G.J.C.

170

OLD EDWARDIANS' ASSOCIATION182

 

IN OTHER PLACES

170

CAMBRIDGE LETTER

184

THE LIBRARY

171

SCOUTING

184

COLOGNE REVISITED

113

SWIMMING

186

THE GLORY THAT WAS GREECE

174

BADMINTON

186

THE MOTOR SHOW

174

FIVES

186

SWITZERLAND. 1953

175

CROSS COUNTRY TEAMS

186

SPEECH DAY

177

Football

187

MUSIC

178

HOUSE 'NOTES

191


School Notes

OVER a long Autumn Term we can look back as far as September 10th for the first " public occasion " of the school year-the official opening of the new Library. This room and its equipment undoubtedly constitute the most ambitious and notable addition to our ancient fabric since its conversion from Wesley College into King Edward VII School. Even from a passing Fulwood bus, Old Edwardians can form some idea of our good fortune and with a nostalgic sigh for the Old Workshop cast envious looks at the New Library.

The same bus also affords a very good view of the rapidly rising edifice which, obliterating the masters' garden or scouts' practice camping ground, will eventually supply us with new laboratories, workshops and other offices.

Our visitor on Armistice Day was an Old Edwardian, Mr. G. Nornable, M.C. (K.E.S., 1926-32). His war service included a period of strenuous activity as a member of the Allied Military Mission operating with the French Maquis, an experience which he has described for us in the MAGAZINE of July 1946. His Armistice Day address, touching simply and modestly on the themes of courage and service, gave a very sincere note to the proceedings; there seemed to be a new significance also in the ritual of the Wreaths, when the party that filed out to the vestibule included a representative of each form, from the lowest to the highest, reminding one somehow of the succession of Edwardians of all ages whom we think of in this ceremony.

Carol Service in the Cathedral, on December 15th, again brought a very full attendance; choir, soloists and readers all contributed excellently to this function, in which reverence and informality are combined in a very agreeable manner.

The Scholarship season has opened well, with six awards at Cambridge. a record only previously equalled in 1943; F. R. Drake, Major Scholarship in Mathematics at Pembroke College; F. G. Newsum, Exhibition in Modern Languages at Pembroke College; A. M. Guenault, Robert Styring Scholarship in Natural Science at Trinity College; J. R. Miller, Exhibition in Natural Science at Clare College; J. M. Jackson, Wootton Isaacson Scholarship in Modern Languages at Trinity Hall: R. M. Walker, Major Scholarship in Mathematics and Physics at Jesus College.

At Oxford, Hastings Scholarships at the Queen's College have been won by J. W. Thompson, for Mathematics, and E. J. Hudson, for Natural Science. Awards for meritorious work in the examination were given to E. P. Lodge (Classics), J. M. Jackson (Modern Languages) and K. A. Taylor (Natural Science).

Winners of Herbert Hughes Memorial Prizes for Spanish were: T. G. Cook, F. G. Newsum (book prizes of £3), J. Lee, D. M. Parfitt (book prizes of £2).

D. Fleeman has passed the examination for Civil Service Executive Grade, and A. Harris for Clerical Grade. A. T. C. Bottomley passed for entrance to the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth. as an engineering cadet.

A. Weston competed in the English Schools Swimming Championships at Bournemouth in October and came second in the 15-18 Backstroke.

The Dramatic Society, under the direction of .Mr. Claypole, will be performing Macbeth in the School Hall on April 12th, 13th and 14th. We are promised an Elizabethan-style production on an open stage-a method to which our Hall is in some ways well, though not ideally, suited, but which, for various reasons, has seldom been fully exploited. There was, of course, a time when such plays as Box and Cox or When Knights Were Bold were done " in the round", for the simple reason that no proscenium equipment existed. The removal of more recent accumulations of paraphernalia will at least throw a fresh light on the merits and defects of our Wooden O.

Other dates to note are:—
School Concert: Victoria Hall, January 27th at 7.30 p.m.
Commemoration Service: at School, May 19th, probably at 7 p.m.
Athletic Sports: Whiteley Woods, May 22nd, 2 p.m.
Oratorio, The Messiah: Victoria Hall, 'May 26th, 7.30 p.m.
Swimming Sports: June 18th, probably at 7 p.m.

In order to complete a series of bound volumes of this MAGAZINE, we are short of one number, that of July 1941. If any reader has a copy which he can spare, we should be very grateful to receive it.

G. J. C.

NOT often does a boy, after completing his education, return to his old school as a master. Gordon Cumming was a pupil at K.E.S. from 1923 to 1931, and was Captain of Football, a member of the Cricket XI, Second Prefect and Head of Chatsworth. He gained a Town Trust Scholarship to Sheffield University, where he graduated with 1st Class Honours in History and Honours in Economics and was awarded the Gladstone Memorial Prize in History in 1934.

He decided to take up teaching. and after a year in the south of England he was appointed to the staff of this school in 1936. He was well endeared to his pupils as form master of 4C and a teacher of History and English in all parts of the school, when war intervened. He served for six years in the Royal Corps of Signals, being demobilised with the rank of Captain and Adjutant. On his return from service he developed the newly formed Economics Course and established it as a very important side of the school curriculum.

What is that unnameable something which a teacher passes on to his pupils? what qualities are there which a boy may emulate?

We have witnessed in Gordon Cumming a steadfastness of purpose, coupled with patience and optimism. His genial personality, modest bearing and unselfish spirit have enabled him to get on so well with the boys in his charge and with his colleagues. (Nor must we forget his great services to the school Scout organisation, of which he was one of the original members in 1927). He loves teaching boys and it was with some qualms and doubts that he accepted the post of Education Officer at Messrs. Samuel Fox & Co., Stocksbridge. Here there will be yet greater scope for his organising ability. ingenuity and enthusiasm.

What better tribute can we pay him than to say he will be remembered and will be missed by all at King Edward VII School? We offer him our congratulations and wish him all success and every happiness in his new post.

S. V. C.

In Other Places

There is a higher proportion [in the Universities] of middling students, as one would expect from the state of the schools.--New Statesman.

Birmingham Education Appeals Sub-Committee last week decided that the child should see a doctor to decide whether she needed earrings."-Daily Telegraph.

' A bomb explosion in the headmaster's study at Vidyasagar Vidyapith School, 100 miles from Calcutta, injured five teachers while they were discussing examination results . . . Dr. B. C. deRoy, West Bengal's Chief Minister, condemned such practices by students." -Manchester Guardian.

The Library

When the 'New Library was first projected nearly two years ago, we did not realise how patient we should have to be. The Local Authorities were in charge, that we knew: but all we saw was echoing emptiness in the place that mattered. The old library-room became a temporary workshop four terms ago. and there the School Library books remained in enforced idleness.

Some months passed, and then the Authorities came in large numbers with plastering-trowels, toolbags and ladders. At the end of their lengthy stay they left some plaster on the old ceiling-girders, a few battens on the walls and some ends of wire sticking out here and there. The dust was given plenty of time to settle. Two craftsmen appeared-could they succeed where dozens had failed to make a visible impression in weeks of occupation? They had not the Authoritarian manner, but they worked rapidly and elegantly: shelves and panelling grew. The painters came.

More waiting. Then Stephenson's Rocket arrived in the yard, with hot tar rumbling in its abdomen. Workmen doubled up the stairs with smoking buckets, others swept tar-mixture over our library floor and glowered when interrupted

 visibility diminished and still the demon-like figures rushed in with more reeking buckets. We were nearly kippered, and formed a prejudice against piece-work. if this was it. The tar-episode was fortunately covered up soon after with cork squares held on by sticky stuff.

Let it not be thought that the room is finished yet: we are still waiting for the finishing touches.

On September 10th, the New Library was presented to us. The Lord Mayor presided, and the meeting in the Library itself was attended by the Governors of the Sheffield Royal Grammar School Exhibition Fund, the School Governors, Headmaster, Staff and Prefects.

After the Lord Mayor's opening words, the Chairman of the Exhibition Fund. Mr. G. Chambers, remembered his own schooldays at R.G.S. and expressed his hope that the words of the commemorative plaque would remind the boys that this gift had been placed in their care to be enjoyed and handed on unharmed to their successors. Mr. Chambers then formally handed over the New Library to the Headmaster. entrusting its disposal to him. Alderman J. H. Bingham, as Chairman of the Education Committee, received the gift with thanks; as Chairman of the School Governors, he felt how much the School was gaining; as one who deals in Education he hoped that our Library would develop minds (as some American had said) in breadth as well as depth; and as a man who read some books and had already looked round the room with a little misgiving, he hoped we should not fill our shelves with too much heavy stuff. At his invitation Mr. Chambers unveiled the plaque. To those of us who had previously rigged up the apparatus with drawing-pins this success was a great relief; our feelings were shared and clapping ensued. The Headmaster and finally the Head Prefect added their thanks and hopes for the future of the Library.

The responsibility for the actual alterations was placed upon the City Architect. Those of a critical turn of mind will like to assess the result in its various aspects. Is the colour-scheme pleasing? How good is our modern lighting Is the woodwork intended more for efficiency that decorativeness? And, if so, is it efficient? Will a later generation see here an original style, or one that dates from, say, the 1920's? How comfortable is the furniture? Are the filing cabinet and display stand good furniture or just " Design " in the hackneyed sense of the word? Does the whole room have that air of purpose and convenience that goes with the use of books?

Users of our collection should gain by familiarity with the classification system, for the method is the same as that of most public libraries. The task of classifying, marking. registering and cataloguing books is a formidable one if the Library records are to be equal to all emergencies. Books are being added constantly about 1,500 from Sixth Form libraries and from the old School Library have been dealt with, in addition to the 1.350 books presented by the R.G.S. Fund. There will be plenty of work for most of the remaining year. The books so far included are mainly of interest to the Upper School: as the scope of available reading widens, it is hoped to allow borrowing by a larger range of classes than at present.

The Library was opened for use immediately after half-term since then the lunch-hours have seen the place well filled, but few boys as yet are availing themselves of the reading-hour after school. About 1,500 borrowers have taken out over 600 books, almost entirely in the non-fiction category; this promises well. It is encouraging too, to see our valuable Encyclopedias being used freely and at the same time being handled with respect. The end-of-term stock-taking has shown that the confidence in users implicit in any open-access library has been justified to the very limit. It is good as well to find how much generosity and goodwill has been waiting to express itself in gifts. Presentations, in many cases several volumes, have been made by the following, who have our thanks:—

M. Alexander, K. Booth, J. P. M. Clinton, A. Copley, Mfr. G. J. Cumming. J. B. Dobson, M. J. Ecclestone, Mr. B. C. Harvey. J. M. Henderson. M. A. R. Johnson, I. H. Jones, R. Lamb, M. A. J. Lee, I. A. Mottershaw, M. J. Otter, G. S. and T. Powell. G. J. Robinson, B. Round. P. D. Ryder, Mrs. Senior, J. R. Shaw. D. H. Thorpe, S. C. Tiddy. D. M. Turner, K. J. Vaughan, Mr. E. L. Vernon, R. A. Winn, D. Williamson.

The Library is mainly dependent on generosity this year, as the Education Committee has withdrawn the Library grant: we look forward to its eventual restoration, but must meanwhile publish this excuse for the inadequate supply of periodicals.

 J. OPPENHEIMER.

   
A Corner of the Library
Photos by E L Vernon

Cologne Revisited

BURG ELTZ-a typical German castle.

IT was obvious as soon as I left the station I that election preparations were in full swing. Walls and the round pillars used for bill-posting were covered with election placards. In some places special hoardings had been erected for these posters. In the Cologne region there were eight parties contesting the election.

The German voting system needs some explanation. Each elector has two votes, which correspond to two columns in the ballot paper. In the first column (printed in black) the voter puts his X against the candidate he prefers, while in the second (printed in blue) he puts an X opposite the party he supports. Thus even if the voter's party has not put up a candidate for his constituency, he can still vote for it in the second column. while voting for the candidate of his choice in the first. Each party has to gain a certain percentage of the votes cast in the second column to gain a seat from it.

Building reconstruction, which I saw last year, was still progressing rapidly, although many wildernesses have yet to be filled. Cologne's shopping centre is fine and modern and the shops provide interest for all. At night the streets are ablaze with many-coloured neon signs.

The Gymnasium Kreuzgasse, the school with which we have a link in Cologne. moved into its new buildings about the middle of the autumn term. Since their original buildings were destroyed during the war, they had been working alternate weeks mornings and afternoons with another school.

After I had been to see my hosts vote on election day (Sunday, September 6th), we went for a long motor tour through the Eifel Mountains. We visited an old castle, Burg Eltz, set on a small hill in a beautiful wooded valley. I saw it on a lovely summer day: but it was easy to imagine it as a blacker shape against a dark sky, with the wind howling through the trees and fierce squalls lashing its high unyielding walls.

From here we went down to the River Moselle, smaller and shallower than the Rhine, with the sides of its valley clad in terraced vineyards. A road skirts the river on both sides and we went up for a short distance passing through the narrow streets of the old town of Karden. before crossing and coming down the south bank to Coblenz. Here the Rhine and Moselle join, and at the junction their different coloured waters are plainly visible. The embankment at the junction, which is surmounted by a monument, was thronged with tourists.

The Monday following Election Day was the anniversary of the founding of the German Parliament, called the Bundestag, and so the school assembled in the yard for an address by the headmaster. He spoke of the importance of freedom and democracy. and then all sang a verse of the -National Anthem. The rest of the day was a holiday.

There can be no doubt that at present all Germans attach supreme importance to the East Berlin uprising of June 17th. Many of the people I spoke to asked if we had heard about the "siebzehnten Juni " in England and what were our thoughts about it. All the Germans seem to feel a great sympathy for their fellow countrymen in the East and they all desire to see their country reunited-this theme was recurrent in the election pamphlets of all parties.

As usually happens, the second week of my stay passed even quicker than the first and it was soon time to say " auf wiedersehen " to my hosts after a most interesting and enjoyable fortnight.

D. J. H. SENIOR.

The Glory that was Greece

I WAS lost on the Acropolis. I recognised the Parthenon: I recognised even the Erectheum but after that I was irretrievably lost. I saw a party of Americans with a Greek guide. I blessed Athena and surreptitiously attached myself to them.

Our guide embarked on a detailed history of the Acropolis, after which there was a dead silence-whether of reverence or because of the temperature I was not sure. At length a strident voice with an unmistakable accent asked, with a profundity which left me gasping Say, Mister Guide, is this place old? " She pointed vaguely in the direction of the Propylaea.

Our guide gave her a glance of withering scorn.

"Why do you listen not to your educated guide: then you will not make foolish thoughts," he replied. I could not help feeling that this direct method of speaking was faintly reminiscent of someone I had heard before. We passed on.

It was a trifle unwise of the guide to proclaim himself "educated": the Americans were delighted. We stopped before the Erectheum. ow this building is dedicated to Athena and Poseidon; it has a porch, a porch of Caryatids, whose columns arc figures of dancing girls. The Educated Guide again gave his history of the temple and dealt the second Caryatid from the left a telling blow with his stick, and fixed me with a baleful glare.

"The original," he said, tapping the Caryatid on the knee. " is in the British Museum." I felt that something was expected of me. I mumbled assent and gazed vacantly at the Areopagus. The Educated Guide seemed to be unsatisfied, so I intimated that I had seen it; at which the guide turned purple and smote the poor girl an even more telling blow for emphasis, and stalked off towards the back of the Erectheum.

The Educated Guide pointed with pride to a hole in the ground.

"Poseidon gave the control of the sea to Athens," he declared. I mumbled something about Britannia; Educated Guide misunderstood and smiled benignly at me; we were now firm allies.

The American lady looked down the hole and asked if this Poseidon guy was buried there. Educated Guide looked superior and ignored her.

We moved sedately towards the front of the Erectheum, where the American lady seated herself on a handy rock. Educated Guide looked almost personally insulted: he transfixed the lady with a firm glare and smote her sharply with his walking stick.

"Move. madam." he ordered. This, he explained, was a stone of even greater antiquity than the venerable Parthenon; even more ancient, he implied, than the offending lady. We moved on without having learned exactly what function the stone performed.

The guide consulted his watch, and regarded the temple of Athena Nike. It was obviously his tea-time. " The temple," he advised, - . is of minor importance; you can see it just as well from the road."

He moved briskly towards the exit, got there first, and stood to let us pass. A tip perhaps We ignored him.

He did look annoyed.

J. H. NOWILL.

The Motor Show

A PARTY from the Fifth Form visited Earl's Court on November 31st. As it was the last day of the show it was crowded, but (reports C. M. N. Vere) only around the really interesting exhibits was it packed.

"The new price models on the Ford and Austin stands attracted far more attention than the more aristocratic Bentley and Rolls models. The main theme, apart from the low price battle, was for attractive speedy sports models. The new Triumph, Allard, Singer, Jowett, Bristol and M.G. models give both speed and attractive export possibilities for America. There were many middle-price British cars, the Rover I think being the best looking. The high-price cars had little really new, mainly minor improvements. The car which stole the show was undoubtedly the Ford Popular, the cheapest, while at the other extreme was the American Ford 100x, which had amongst other things polaroid windscreens, and a 300 h.p. engine; over eight miles of wire were used in its construction. This model was not vet in production, being only in the experimental stage. The other foreign cars were quite interesting-German diesel cars, the tiny French Renault and Fiat, and the huge American chrome-covered ones. When you look at the Cadillac or Hudson and think of petrol consumption, you can see why the British cars sell."

Switzerland, 1953

GRINDELWALD, from the Baregg path. 

APARTY of sixteen boys, with Mr. and Mrs. Kopcke, spent five days of August on the shore of Lake Brienz and five at Lauchbuhl in the Grindelwald Valley.

P. Glover's impressions set the general picture:

"We soon recovered from a comparatively sleepless night on French railways to find ourselves staying at a very pleasant hotel about ten minutes walk from the village. The food was mostly traditional and rather strange to our Yorkshire palates.

"The party had much choice in its activities. A few stalwarts carried out their personal expeditions and conquered several of the local peaks, but the majority ' climbed ' the Rothorn on the mountain railway. Rowing on the lake was a popular pastime and a few of us went swimming in the extremely cold waters of the deep lake. The village is a centre for wood-carving and offered a huge selection of small objects suitable for presents. The hotel lacked a games room. but a party of girls from Middlesborough filled the gap admirably for some of the company. The others spent less hectic evenings writing home. looking round the village or drinking cider.

'' Swiss National Day was a major attraction and the celebrations in the evening were very lively. The village was gaily decorated and put on a spectacular firework display.

(It was on this occasion. we learn from another source, that the Bernese Cantonal Hymn was mistaken for a welcome to our representatives, the tune being that of " God Save the Queen ").

A striking contrast was met when we moved to Lauchbuhl. The hotel was practically ' out of this world ', being at 5,000 feet and an hour's walk from the village. The food here was plentiful and very English. There was no electricity at the hotel and, as a precaution against fire. all naked lights had to be extinguished at ten o'clock. As nobody thought of going to bed until well after this hour, the retirement of the party each night caused quite a stir."

Mr. Kopcke's narrative completes the story

"We took some fine walks from Lauchbuhl, the most ambitious being the ascent of the Schwarzhorn (over 9,000 feet). Unhappily rain and mist prevented any view and our sole reward was the joy of conquest. Better instructed explorers wear boots covered in nails, but some of our party, with insular originality. preferred town shoes for the ascent. Descending a snow slope, most of the party assumed a sitting position by accident, and our return was accordingly much speeded up. Another memorable hike took a party up the valley of the lower Grindelwald Glacier to Banisegg.''

Mr. Kopcke adds these observations about school trips in general:

"It is sometimes supposed that these visits are subsidised by the authorities. This is not so; every boy pays the full cost of the tour. The trips are usually arranged through an agency specialising in group tours. There are many such firms and their arrangements are not. I dare say, universally excellent. This year we dealt with a Swiss agency whose arrangements were in some respects barely acceptable, though their fees were as low as we have come across.

" There has been some criticism in the press recently of the behaviour of parties of young Britons abroad; as usual the schoolmasters and schoolmistresses are blamed. They are of course to some extent responsible. I myself have noticed the widely different standards of behaviour displayed by parties abroad. This is in part a reflection of the general tone of the homes and schools the parties are drawn from, and in part a measure of the leaders' authority. But I do say that some hotels abroad have never faced up to the fact that a party of young people is bound to be excited and exuberant. Lastly, on the two foreign tours I have arranged, the accommodation provided for the party has been widely scattered-with the exception of that at Lauchbuhl. Thus the agency arrangements have from the start made supervision late at night and early in the morning practically impossible. None of this, however, alters the fact that I think such visits are of real value and benefit, and I wish that the cost of such journeys were such that many more boys could enjoy them."

Speech Day

October 22nd, 1953

PROGRAMME

THE SCHOOL SONG 

THE HEADMASTER'S REPORT

THE CHAIRMAN OF THE GOVERNORS
(Alderman J. H. Bingham, LL.D., J.P.)

LATIN ADDRESS OF WELCOME
Spoken by W. D. COUSIN

Distribution of Prizes and Address by
E. T. WILLIAMS, ESq., C.B., C.B.E., D.S.O.,
Warden of Rhodes House, Oxford

Vote of Thanks to the Chairman and Mr. E. T. Williams,
proposed by the Lord Mayor of Sheffield (Councillor Oliver S. Holmes, F.C.A., J.P.),
seconded by the Master Cutler (R. L. Walsh, Esq.)

Expression of thanks on behalf of the School by
the Head Prefect, I. A. MOTTERSHAW

Allegro Marziale

(The School Orchestra)

John Stanley

Greek Declamation

An incident from "The Odyssey"
(E. P. Lodge)

Homer

English Declamation

"The Wif of Bathe"
(Prologue to Canterbury Tales)
(I. A. Mottershaw)

Chaucer

Song

"To Music"
(P. Swain)

Schubert

German Declamation

" The City" (1947)
(D. J. H. Senior)

Ursula Jespersen

Chorus

``Come, if you dare" (from King Arthur)
(The School Choir and Orchestra)

Purcell

French Declamation

" Apres Trois Ans "
(T. G. Cook)

Verlaine

Viola Solo

Two Minuets
(J. P. Catchpole)

Bach

Spanish Declamation

"La Batalla de Roncesvalles "
(J. M. Jackson)

Anon

Choral Song

 "Go forth with God"
(The School Choir and Orchestra)

 Martin Shaw

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN

As the Chairman took an early opportunity of mentioning, this year's occasion was notable for the fact that, with the exception of himself and the Headmaster, the platform party consisted entirely of Old Boys of K.E.S. or Wesley College. We had looked forward for some time to welcoming one of our most distinguished O.E.'s, Mr. E. T. Williams, and it was a happy coincidence that brought together at the same time an O.E. Lord Mayor and an O.E. Master Cutler.

The programme followed the customary lines, and the usual high standard of linguistic accomplishment was expected of the audience. Along with Latin, Greek, German, French and Spanish, they found Chaucerian English this year added to the syllabus, and very competently rendered by I. A. Mottershaw.

Mr. E. T. Williams had some sound and interesting things to say, interspersed with some felicitous leg-pulling. In the latter category we remember his classification of boys into two species-Wednesdayites and Unitedites: a true Wednesdayite being one who didn't like to see United beaten by anybody else; and his observation that more homework was being done than ever before-to escape helping with the washing-up! Sincerity, however, was the keynote of his tribute to the School and the City, "the ugly, friendly City ", from which he and his family had derived so much benefit and happiness. The high standards of K.E.S. (though he didn't like it at first, but grew to like it), supported by the discipline of a home where high principles, respect for culture, and " not much money ", were the rule, gave him much to be grateful for. His advice to boys was to "grow up" (" school-days are definitely not the best years of your life ")-to make up their minds what to do and go for it whole-heartedly-to make mistakes if necessary and learn from them-and to put more into life than they expected to take out.

The Headmaster's Report

The Headmaster described the year as a good one, "perhaps not packed with scintillating successes but one of solid achievement and quite reasonable satisfaction ". The visit of Her Majesty's Inspectors had resulted in a satisfactory report, most of the matters criticised being under the head of equipment and supply.

In the matter of curriculum, an attempt to group boys in the fourth year with a view to their future advanced work had proved unsatisfactory, and in future such decisions would have to be made in the fourth year and take effect in the fifth. The abolition of the age limit for G.C.E. was a welcome step, though it resulted in a large and complicated entry in 1953, with confusing results.

"The new examination system makes it exceedingly difficult to really assess standards.  We have to remember that boys are taking varying numbers of subjects, and that in many cases the best ones in a subject, who are later to specialise in it, are not taking it at all in the examination. So percentages, although beloved of so many of us, and particularly by administrators, are a feeble guide. I have sympathy with the boy who has to leave school at sixteen under the new system, as he can so easily just fail to produce a satisfactory result. Here I would definitely criticise the G.C.E. The results are still used by future employers and professional bodies as a yardstick of the boy's attainment. The results obtained in an external examination must of necessity have more attention paid to them than any internal certificate can carry. While admittedly the pass mark of the old School Certificate was too low, equally now the pass mark (the only mark) is often too high. I do not favour the 'distinction' or `very good' mark at this stage of education, but I would definitely like to have two standards of passing—a low pass and a high pass, e.g., 40 per cent. and 60 per cent. This would, I feel, be much fairer for many of our less gifted pupils who do their best and put up a reasonable performance, which in itself is not really unsatisfactory but is not shown on any certificate."

In 0 " level the overall percentage of subject passes was 71. In " A " level, it was 84, with 33 distinctions and 9 State Scholarships, 8 of the latter being from the Mathematics and Science side. In the Scholarship field we had improved considerably on last year, though we were disappointed in not gaining more successes at Oxford and Cambridge; but with two years of National Service to face, boys were not likely to stay for the extra year, which could make the vital difference. At the commencement of the year we had 44 boys hoping to proceed to a University; we were able to place 41 of these—a further criterion of the satisfactory state of the Advanced Course work.

Participation in the life of the School outside the classroom was a highly important item for the boy who was staying on for further education. After reviewing the activities of the various games organisations and school societies, the Headmaster stressed the value of such activities. "The various Societies," he said, "provide good training grounds for initiative and organisation on the part of their officials, and excellent practice in discussion and debate for members. University and Service questionnaires always make this an enquiry: testimonials for College and Universities are thin if only work can be commented on. But confidence and aptitude for speaking are also gained; these carry their weight in interviews. The interview is increasingly becoming the deciding factor in so many quests today-College Entries, Faculty Entries, Civil Service, the Services, and now even for the Education Committee Scholarships. I would urge parents, therefore, who wish their sons to succeed, to encourage them to participate fully in the activities the School has to offer. Positions of responsibility are necessarily limited, but a boy who takes an active and not passive part in school affairs is known, and gains thereby."

The acquisition of the new Library, the gift of the Governors of the Sheffield Royal Grammar School Exhibition Fund, had been a notable event of the year; gifts of books from leaving boys and their parents were also gratefully acknowledged.

The Headmaster concluded with his thanks for the generous help of the Staff in their various capacities-not forgetting the Secretary, the School Clerk, Caretaker and Groundsman.

The Latin Address

Nihil mihi grades esse potest quam officio et humanitatis et pietatis erga hunt fungi, qui cum hospes poster in contionem advocator turn tanquam ad ludum alumnus spectates probatusque revocatur. Alter enim ad hunt conventum infra quadriennium e philosophic nostratibus Oxonia advenit. Quam versatile hit vir et multiplex ingenium prae se fert, in quern unum duae inter se contrariae artex, militaris et scholastics, sent coniunctae. Aped exercitum Octavanum stipendia meritus rumores Africanos aestimavit, solitudines harenosas perscrutatus est, quid hostes in animo haberet coniectura perspexit. Nec destitit acutam ingenii aciem adhibere ad res longe diversissimas duet Germani a Nilo usque ad mare Suevium fugantur fundunturque. Deinde bello refrigescente socius Balliolensis ascriptus est, in concilio pentium UNO ore otium tranquillitatemque petentium onus offici non mediocre suscepit. Oxoniam regresses qui rebus gerendis interfuerat iam rerum gestarurn rationem explicat, donec eorum adulescentium qui, ab omnibus imperi finibus ex Caecili Rhodi testamento delecti, studiorum cum magistris, cum Cantabrigiensibus ludorum in certamine contendunt, custos praefectus est. Talis est cuius attends omnium auribus exspectatur oratio.

Music

AT this time last year we reached a record Choir membership of 120. This total has now been exceeded by over ten and could well have been higher. No less than sixty-seven new boys were candidates for entry; an embarrassing total which necessitated some frantic auditioning on the first day, for we cannot overload in this department. We need, as always, more altos and tenors.

The Choir prepared Purcell's "Come if you dare" and Martin Shaw's "Go forth with God" for Speech Day, the former, it must be admitted, suffering somewhat from the deadening effect and heat of the overcrowded hall. Conditions were better and results first-rate at the Carol service in the Cathedral, which although completely full yet retained some resonance. The Choir have certainly never sung better than at this service, which, from Nicholson's unaccompanied solo first verse of " Once in Royal David's City " to the electrifying " Fanfare for Xmas Day ". was assured and well-tuned. Work for the Concert at the Victoria Hall on January 27th has been carried on at the same time. To this the Choir will contribute Dyson's " Four Songs for Sailors the Showman's Songs from Vaughan Williams' opera:: Hugh the Drover " (soloists, Sharpe and Swain), a Purcell part-song and Hely-Hutchinson's delightful setting of " Old Mother Hubbard " in the style of Handel.

The Orchestra has recovered well from the inevitable losses that the end of the school year brings, and as newcomers we welcome Dancer, Hawkins, Shekelton, Johnson (violins), Anderson (viola), Fairest ('cello), Green (oboe), Bomber (clarinet), Beech (trombone), Wolstenholme (trumpet) and Watson (drums). Elliott has very ably taken over the difficult job of piano-continuo, haying graduated as the custom is with us from the kitchen department. At Speech Day, apart from accompanying the choir, the orchestra gave a spirited playing of a trumpet tune of John Stanley (Trumpet in D: 'N. Cunnington), and Catchpole in great style showed us the viola as a solo instrument. We shall hear him again in the Concert, and also Holgate (flute). For the Concert the main orchestral work in rehearsal is the first movement of Haydn's great Symphony -No. 104 in D, which should receive a good performance. Last year's Head Prefect said farewell to us with a performance of the solo part in an organ concerto. This year's (I. A. Mottershaw) will appear as soloist in the Oboe Concerto arranged by Barbirolli from themes by Pergolesi. (Are we starting a tradition of musical Head Prefects? )

We are most grateful to Mr. Smith for taking over the Violin Classes this term, and to Mr. Clarke, who, after taking up the viola on coming to the School, continues to produce a steady supply of competent players. There appears to be a good reserve of talented beginners who will in due course help to maintain the orchestra, and everything depends on this early spade work.

The Madrigal Group has, as usual. suffered from being an extra to be fitted in where possible. We have not been able to count on all the trebles and altos who are capable of this exacting pursuit, for varying reasons (some of them not very adequate), and after a time it was thought best to abandon the five-part pieces embarked upon, and turn to four-part ones which would not divide the trebles. The group will appear at the Concert, and its tenors and basses will again be singing a set of negro spirituals. While on the subject of part-singing, it is rumoured that three members of staff have been haying furtive lunch-hour practices of unaccompanied trios in preparation for the concert.

After the Concert work will begin for the production of " Messiah '' in May, and it is hoped that any additional boys, particularly tenors and altos, who wish to sing in this will make their desire known as soon as possible so that scores may be obtained for them.

'N. J. B.

School Societies

Student Christian Movement

This term has been one of the most successful the Group has had for some time. Five internal meetings and two inter-school meetings (one of them at K.E.S.) have been held.

The first discussion, entitled " I believe in God . . ." dealt with the fundamentals of our belief and helped to clarify our ideas a little. The second was inspired by the Conference held at Hollowford, which seven of our members attended. This week-end conference will always be remembered for the dramatic activities of the K.E. contingent (but the rumour that our secretary has been nominated for the title of Beauty Queen of Castleton for 1954 is entirely unfounded).

Our next diversion was a trip " across the road ", where we enjoyed the hospitality of the G.H.S. and fine talk on " How to understand the Bible." Shortly after that, M. J. May introduced a discussion on the Creeds-, a very welcome visitor at this meeting was Mr. Effron, who soon provided a very lively discussion.

Our only outside speaker at the Tuesday meetings was Mr. Ecclestone, Vicar of Darnall. who talked on " Christianity and Politics ". He was very open-minded and after a most interesting discussion he brought us to the conclusion that Christians should take sides in political questions.

As a preparation to the inter-school meeting, J. W. Thompson invited us to discuss the vital subject " Is the Bible true? " This question was answered more fully at the meeting which was held here on 'November 25th, and was generally agreed to have been a huge success.

Our final meeting of the term took us out of this world into the realm of spirits: we were ably led thither by Lomas, and a count at the end ensured that we had not left anyone behind. The Group thanks Mr. Summers for the splendid way he has helped us through the term; smoothing waters when too vigorous discussion has taken place, and gently leading us back to the fold when we have gone off to chase red herrings. Thanks are also due to all the boys who helped in various ways during the inter-school meeting.

L. R. C.

International Discussion Group

On October 5th the Group was addressed by Mr. Robert Smith, of Yale University. His subject, " Is McCarthy typical of the U.S.A.? " stimulated discussion and called forth a considerable number of questions. Although Mr. Smith assured us that the average American was quite " sane ", I am afraid some of us were not so sure

During U.K. `Peek, the Society joined with the Literary and Debating Society to discuss the motion "that the United Nations Organisation has proved a failure ". The I.D.G., opposing the motion, had a clear majority in the division.

On -November 16th we heard a lucid and enlightening address by Mr. J. St. Elmo Hall, a native of the West Indies, on the problems facing Federation of those islands.

At the last meeting of the term. X. H. Cunnington told us of his wanderings last summer in British Columbia. From what we could gather, he thoroughly enjoyed himself in spite of iron rations and mosquitoes.

The Group has, with much regret, to say farewell to its founder and President, Mr. G. J. Cumming, who is leaving to take up a post at Messrs. Samuel Fox, Ltd., Stocksbridge. We would like to thank him very warmly for all the work he has put in since he founded the Group in 1946, and to wish him every success in his new job.

L. R. C.

Modern Language Society

Three meetings have been held this term, all in some way concerned with holiday experiences.

On September 24th, J. H. Nowill spoke about Greece and Italy, a part of the world not often visited by our reporters. He gave an account of their architecture, well illustrated by photographs, and told us something of the people as he had found them, stressing particularly the great friendliness of the Greeks towards the British.

On October 13th, J. M. Jackson gave a description in somewhat lighter vein of the joys and hazards of motoring through France and Spain in a hybrid vehicle called " Annie ". His talk was illustrated by photographs and Spanish repair bills.

On October 27th, the Secretary, D. J. H. Senior, gave a talk on the German elections, and on German life in general.

We hope to have a varied programme next term, and look forward to more support from the Fifth Form.

D. J. H. S.

Photographic Society

At a meeting on September 25th, with twenty members present, Mr. Vernon demonstrated tank development with the aid of his own tank and an old film. On November 26th, twenty-three members enjoyed a very instructive talk by Mr. Harrison, secretary of the Sheffield Photographic Society, on '- Enlargers and Enlarging ".

A number of film shows were given after school to the younger members, which were very much enjoyed, and we hope to give some more next term. We would like to thank Mr. Glewis, the laboratory steward, who kindly operated the projector for us on these occasions.

Early in the Christmas term, we received a donation of much equipment and books from Mr. E. W. Clegg, an Old Boy of Wesley College, for which we are extremely grateful. May we suggest to any other Old Boys or friends of the School that if they have any photographic apparatus for which they have no use, we should be only too glad to receive it.

The Darkroom has been very well used, with an average weekly attendance of 25, but we should be glad to see even more boys working there during the dinner-hour. Our thanks are due to J. A. Hunt, last year's secretary, for the work he did for the society over many years, and we wish him every success in his career.

M. H. J.

Classical Society

(President, W. D. Cousin; Secretary, J. K. Ferguson; Treasurer, A. J. Pinion).

Three meetings have been held this term. A discussion was held on the production of Greek plays on the modern stage; Mr. C. E. Silver gave an illustrated lecture on " Roman frontier defence in Britain "; and Mr. D. V. Henry entertained a very appreciative audience with a paper on " Ancient Magic ". Attendance at the meetings this term has fallen short of expectation. It is hoped that all members will make a greater effort to give their support on as many occasions as possible.

C. E. S.

Literary and Debating Society

Since the formation of a Literary and Debating Society for the Third and Fourth Forms, the Fifth Form have been admitted to our meetings this term. The following meetings have been held

(1) Debate: " That capital punishment should be abolished." Proposed by L. R. Cliffe and F. G. Newsum, opposed by E. P. Lodge and J. C. Tebbet. A large number of speeches followed from the floor: egged on by an extraordinary outburst from Wordsworth and some sound dialectic from Mr. Johnston. the House defeated the motion by 11 votes to 6.

(2) Joint debate with I.D.G.: ' That UNO has failed." Proposed by E. M. Thomas and F. G. Newsum, opposed by I. R. Credland and N. H. Cunnington. Ignorance of the work of UNO marked most of the speeches from the floor, but apart from the few taxpayers who felt that they got no return for the money which the nation pays to ti N O, it was felt that it has done very well within the limitations under which it has to work; the motion was defeated by 9 votes to 6.

(3) Book reviews. D. J. H. Senior on the Penguin Four Gospels. Mr. Johnston on Norval Gelderhuys's Supreme Authority, dealing with the origins and development of authority in the Christian Church. G. S. Ecclestone on Basil Davidson's Daybreak in China-the author's visit to China in 1952 and the social reform carried out there since the Communist revolution. J. M. Fisher on Leslie and Adamski's Flying Saucers Have Landed: followed, perhaps appropriately, by R. 31. Walker on Great Stories of Science Fiction.

Support has been consistently moderate; the predominance of the second year Sixth suggests that, unless support from the Fifth and first year Sixth improves, the society will be weak next year. We must thank Mr. Claypole for taking the chair and keeping speakers to the time limit.

R. F. M.

Middle School Debating Society

September 23rd: Short stories read by members.

October 11th: " That this House will vote for the Labour Party in the next General Election ", proposed by A. R. Wood, opposed by G. A. Smith; defeated by 14 votes to 6.

November 4th: Impromptu debates of a frivolous nature were vigorously contested.

 November 28th: " That this House deplores the B.B.C. 's present monopoly of Radio and TV broadcasting proposed by J. C. Fletcher, opposed by J. Miller: defeated by 13 votes to 3, with 3 abstentions.

The society has had to rely upon a small but devoted band of members to keep its affairs functioning. The standard of speaking has not been high, but the speakers have been earnest and enthusiastic even when they lacked debating skill.

C. A. R.

Scientific Society

At the A.G.M. it was suggested that more talks should be given by boys in the Society and a good response was obtained, with the result that three of the four talks this term were given by Sixth Formers. These were all well delivered, the subjects chosen being " Jet Engines ", Ants". and Geology ". Undoubtedly the most appealing talk, however, judging by the audience it attracted, was the one by Mr. Thorne, of the City Architect's Department, who enlightened all present as to the amount of work and time spent upon planning the new school extensions. As well as giving a very informative talk, Mr. Thorne brought along an enormous number of blue-prints and plans for our inspection: apparently the plan now being used is the third design drawn and the result of about a year's work in the drawing offices. After seeing the plans I am sure we are all eagerly awaiting the finishing of the new block and the day when it comes into regular use.

Next term we expect a fuller programme, and to this end, if any member knows of a possible speaker who would address the Society, we should be obliged for details.

E. J. H.

Junior History Society

(Secretary, P. Fells 4 (1): Treasurer, J. Miller 3 (1).

On September 30th, P. L. Scowcroft (O.E.), of Trinity Hall, Cambridge, gave a lecture on Twentieth Century Warfare " to a large and appreciative audience. On October 3rd, Mr. D. W. Collins led a small party to the Sheffield Manor and Queen Mary's Tower. On October 28th, Mr. J. Bartlett, M.A., Deputy Director of the City Museum, gave a most interesting talk, illustrated by slides, on " Digging for the Past ". The Gaumont-British instructional film " The Civil War in England " was shown to a crowded audience in the L.L.R.

 Several members are making projects on various interesting subjects of local history. It is hoped to show these and to have short talks on some of them on January 20th.

The City Museum has been particularly helpful in the History work this term, having provided, besides the lecture at School, lectures at the Museum for both First and Sixth Form boys and having loaned a box of archaeological specimens.

Craft and Construction Society

The society has expanded considerably with the formation of two sections, senior and junior, and our time of meeting has been changed to Friday evening, this being preferred by the majority. Several of our members have been working for the Radio Society on the oscilloscope which is now well in hand. A low voltage power supply is being fitted to the benches in the L.E.L., a facility which has been felt necessary for some time. The apparatus constructed this term includes an interesting demonstration illustrating the principle of the conservation of momentum, an octagonal mirror mounted on a gramophone turntable for observing vibrations, and a model domestic wiring system. Several small repairs have also been carried out.

R. J. J. O.

Radio Society

The first term of this new society has been fairly successful, although the programme has not been as extensive as is really desirable. A number of boys have met each Monday night in the L.E.L., and work has proceeded on a Cathode Ray Oscilloscope for the Physics department and on a number of smaller instruments belonging to the boys themselves. We hope that the New Year will see the society firmly established.

P. R. M.

Chess Club

The Club still suffers from a lack of members in the Upper School, especially in the Sixth Form. We have, however, a keen section of junior members, whose enthusiasm perhaps more than matches their skill, though at least one plays a businesslike game. This term only one match game was arranged against another school, and in this we were soundly beaten 5-1. Next term we hope to arrange more contests against other schools, and we should certainly improve our record if we could have more Sixth Form members to play for us.

H. B.

 Old Edwardians' Association

Cricket Section, Season 1953

The first team undoubtedly had its best season since the War; out of 25 fixtures arranged 10 were won, 4 drawn, 3 lost, the remaining 8 being victories for the weather. This successful season was mainly due to a good deal more consistency among our batsmen, which had been sadly lacking in previous seasons. This improvement in the batting resulted in higher totals being reached and thus giving our bowlers, who have not let us down for some seasons, a better chance of removing our opponents, and this they did in most cases.

The side was captained by Messrs. H. E. Pearson and E. W. Sivil who were always full of enthusiasm and their example when fielding undoubtedly improved the standard in the whole side, a welcome change from what we had come to expect, for in past seasons many matches could have been won with keener fielding.

We were pleased to have several younger players with us and also to have boys still at School during the Holidays, and we look forward to having these boys as full Club Members in a year or two.

The second team had 21 fixtures arranged of which 3 were won, 4 drawn, 6 lost and 8 washed out, and whilst not having quite such a successful season as the first team, had an extremely enjoyable one, and the spirit of the team, which included several newcomers who had recently left School, was always high. Of the newcomers B. G. Hall soon gained a place in the first team whilst Philip Wassell's keenness in the field was an example to the remainder of the side, young and old alike.

The side -was captained by C. E. Shooter, and R. L. Rangecroft was Vice-Captain: throughout the season they both did a fine job which on occasions would have taken the heart out of any Captain, but they were never beaten until the winning hit had been made. The strength of the side lay in the batting, a number of high scores being recorded. Had the bowling been as effective more wins would have undoubtedly been forced. We are hoping that this defect will be remedied in 1954.

Officials of the Club already appointed for the 1954 Season are as follows:
General Secretary-D. H. Woodcock, 77, Bents Road, 11.

Team Secretaries-P. Dearden and M. J. Heeley.
1st Team Captain-E. W. Sivil.
1st Team Vice-Capt.-P. K. Everitt.
2nd Team Captain-G. Horn.
2nd Team Vice-Captain-C. E. Shooter.

BATTING AVERAGES

(5 INNINGS)

 
   

Inns.

N.O.

Runs

Aver.

Kay, D. S.

 

10

1

196

21.77

Sivil, E. W.

 

18

1

337

19.82

Bain, E..

  6

1

83

16.60

Dearden, P.

 

14

9

76

15.20

Pearson, H. E.

 

8

0

119

14.87

Woodcock, D. H.

 

16

1

217

14.46

Speet, J.

 

12

1

159

14.45

Everitt, P. K.

 

5

0

67

13.40

Allsop, E.

 

18

2

198

12.37

Hall, B. G.

 

8

2

61

10.16

Turner, D. 31.

 

7

0

59

8.42

Smith, N. G.

 

5

1

22

5.40

Bullard, D. G.

 

5

2

16

5.33

Also batted: White, A. A., Armytage, D., Drake, J., Dunn, J., Glenn, A., Smith, B., Tiddy, S. C.,:Milne, D.

BOWLING AVERAGES

 

(15 OvERs)

 

Overs

Mdns.

Runs Wkts.

Aver.

Allsop, E.

138.3

41

376

58

6.47

Speet, J.

24.2

5

58

10

9.80

Bullard, D. G.

24.3

5

68

6

11.33

Pearson, H. E.

78.5

15

209

18

11.61

Turner, D. M.

19.0

2

62

5

12.40

Kay, D. S.

89.0

19

244

15

16.26

Armytage, D.

70.0

20

215

12

17.91

Bailey, F.

53.0

9

140

7

20.00

Also bowled: Smith, B., Smith, N.,:Milne, D., Glenn, A., White, A. A.

Soccer Section, December, 1953.

The successes achieved so far this season by both teams permits the club to look back on the year 1953 with favour and to look forward to 1954 with confidence that the club will maintain the standard which it has now set.

Since January last the 1st team has lost only 5 games in 30 matches, and at present can claim to be Division I leaders of the South Yorkshire Amateur League, having won 10 out of 11 games in the competition this season. It is hoped that the next report will be able to tell the same story. If it can, then the club will be able to claim its best season for many years-certainly since 1938. P. K. Everitt is Captain of the 1st team and N. G. Sargent, Vice-Captain.

The 2nd team, captained by H. Homes, with D. J. Wilson as Vice-Captain, has also proved to be a most useful side and after only a moderate start has not been defeated in the last 9 games. It is most encouraging that the club can report so favourably of the position to date, due, no doubt, to the enthusiastic support and the ability of some of the younger members; it is hoped that boys leaving School who wish to continue playing football will join the Old Edwardians' A.F.C. so that they may assist the club in maintaining the position it now holds.

The following two teams have represented the club in the majority of the matches played this season.

1st Team:—

D. Parnham; P. K. Everitt, N. G. Sargeant; A. M. Maxted, J. C. M. Gee, J. R. Wingfield; L. Buckle, G. G. Powell, D. S. Kay, R. H. Jackson, G. S. Colebrook.

2nd Team:—

D. J. Wilson; J. R. Gee, R. B. Bradshaw K. F. Chambers, J. G. Marriott, H. Holmes; H. S. Gill, J. Goodwin, B. Wildsmith, R. Needham, S. C. Tiddy.

The South Yorkshire Amateur League Tables up to and including matches played on 12th December, 1953, are as follows:-•

DIVISION I

               
         

Goals

   
 

P

W

L

D

For

Agst

Pts

 

Old Edwardians' "A"

11

10

1

0

37

14

20  

Ravens "A"

10

7

2

1

43

27

15

 

Old Firparnians "A"

9

6

1

2

26

17

14

 

Hollinsend Amateurs

13

6

5

2

43

40

14

 

Sheffield F.C.

14

6

7

1

39

35

13

 

Sheffield U. "A"

13

6

7

0

40

37

12

 

0. Cestrefeldians "A"

12

5

5

2

35

44

12

 

City Training C. "A"

11

5

5

1

28

25

11

 

Atlas and Norfolk

10

5

4

1

33

31

11

 

Sheffield W'wrks "A"

13

5

7

1

31

38

11

 

Y.M.C.A. "A"

8

3

3

2

23

21

8

 

Sheffield Bankers

12

3

8

1

25

40

7

 

Grove Amateurs

12

3

8

1

30

49

7

 

Sheffield Trans. "A"

10

1

8

1

16

31

3

 

DIVISION II

             
         

Goals

     
 

P

W

L

D

For

Agst

Pts

 

Sheffield Teach. "A"

13

11

1

1

46

18

23

 

Old Centralians "A"

12

10

0

2

37

13

22

 

Grimesthorpe W.R.

14

8

5

1

41

32

17

 

Inland Revenue

11

7

3

1

29

26

15

 

Nether E. O.B. "A"

14

6

6

2

40

31

14

 

Sheffield U. "B"

14

7

7

0

56

51

14

 

Old Edwardians' "B"

14

4

5

5

33

30

13

 

Electricity Sports

10

6

4

0

39

26

12

 

De La Salle O.B.

12

6

6

0

41

35

12

 

Chesterfield Nomads

12

4

6

2

29

36

10

 

Y.M.C.A. "B"

12

5

r

0

29

42

10

 

Sheffield Savings Bk.

12

2

7

3

23

3 7

7

 

Fulwood

9

3

5

1

17

28

7

 

City Training C. "B"

15

1

11

3

22

50

5

 

Millspaugh

12

2

9

1

21

48

5

 

It is proposed to form a Swimming and Water Polo section within the Association. Decisions as to the necessary subscription, and other arrangements, depend on the number of members likely to support the section. Anyone interested is asked to get in touch with E. Kalman, 549, Ecclesall Road.

 Members, and intending members, are reminded that the Secretary, E. W. Sivil, has recently changed his address: it is now' 67, Slayleigh Lane, Fulwood.

Mr. RAYMOND MEEKE, an Old Boy of Wesley College, and father of an Edwardian, died last August, aged 68. He had been Registrar of Sheffield County Court since 1931. He served in France in the Royal Garrison Artillery during the First War and was awarded the Croix de Guerre. He had also been Past Master of St. Leonard's Lodge and a Grand Lodge officer; honorary secretary of the Reform Club; and in 1950 President of Sheffield District Incorporated Law Society.

NICHOLAS WOLSTENHOLME (K.E.S., 1936-46) died, after recurrent illness of many years, on August 28th, aged 26.

Mr. R. L. WALSH, Master Cutler, was a boy at K.E.S. from 1915 to 1920. After studying engineering and metallurgy at Sheffield University as a works student, he became at the age of 23 a director of the Sheffield Cardboard Box Co., and later built up the scissors factory of Champion & Co. to its modern proportions. He is also the great-great-grandson of a Master Cutler, Thomas Champion.

P. F. LLOYD (1941-49) spent three years as an underground trainee in coal mining, and has obtained a National Coal Board Scholarship tenable at Nottingham University, where he has passed his Intermediate examinations.

G. D. JORDAN (1939-42) has been awarded the James Clayton Fellowship of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. He is a lubricating engineer with Samuel Fox & Co. of Stocksbridge, and his fellowship will enable him to tour steelworks in this country and U.S.A. for study of industrial lubrication.

Chief Officer A. J. R. TYRRELL (1940-41) was presented with a silver medal by the Duke of Edinburgh, on obtaining highest marks of any candidate in the British Empire in his extra-master's examination, thus becoming fully qualified to command an ocean-going liner.

J. W. ILLINGWORTH (1940-47) has passed Final examination Parts I and II of the Society of Incorporated Accountants and Auditors.

Rev. Canon H. E. W. TURNER (1916-25), Professor of Divinity in the University of Durham, is the author of Jesus, Master and Lord: a study in the historical truth of the Gospels, published by Mowbray 21s.

 A. G. DAWTRY (1926-34) has been appointed Town Clerk of Wolverhampton.

J. F. WRIGHT (1941-48) has been appointed Lecturer in Economics at Trinity College, Oxford.

G. W. TORY (1923-31) has been appointed Deputy High Commissioner in Peshawar. Pakistan.

F. THOMPSON (1943-51) has been awarded a National Coal Board Scholarship.

Cambridge Letter

St. John's College, Cambridge.

Dear Sir,

Although there are now twenty-three Old Edwardians in Cambridge, the only meeting this term took place in order to discuss arrangements for the annual dinner, which is to be held after Christmas.

Mr. Brian Buckroyd, having spent the summer in America, disregarded the normal modes of transport for his return, and crossed the atlantic in an open sailing boat. After a shave and a hair-cut, he once more became normal.

Another of our members is again making his presence felt in University politics, whilst Messrs. Frith and Stanfield continue to cook meals over a Heath Robinson arrangement of rubber tubes and glass pipes. It must be admitted, however, that the results are good.

On the sporting side, both G. B. Crowder and M. A. R. Johnson ran in the Inter-University Freshmen's athletic meeting at Oxford, earlier this term.

Yours sincerely,

K. R. HEELEY.

Scouting

"A" TROOP

WE congratulate D. J. F. Clinton, D. L. Wragg, and P. Wright, on the award of Bushman's Thongs_ By the time this is in print, we should have new Queen's Scouts in " A " Troop, the first for three or four years. This is a very good achievement, and we hope that we shall now- have a few Queen's Scouts each year.

The majority of the Troop are at present working for their First Class and making good progress. All recruits, invested well before Christmas, are on their way towards Second Class. The Troop earned a good number of special proficiency badges during the term, but we should like to see more Scouts going for individual badges on their own initiative.

At the beginning of the term the Raven patrol was awarded a pennant in the Troop Trophy Competition at the Farm Grounds. Although this was a good individual effort on the part of one patrol, the support given to patrol efforts generally is still not good enough. To make a good and effective patrol, the leadership and initiative of the patrol leader must be combined with full support from each member.

We have to thank the parents for their encouraging support. With the help of the scouts they ran a whist drive and jumble sale during the term, and hope to follow them with more events in the New Year.

G. L.

B " TROOP

THE Troop continues at full strength and no difficulty was found in making good the losses incurred at the end of the Summer term.

The present term has been devoted to training, and good progress has been made. 2nd Duke has been awarded the Scout Cord and First Class badges have been gained by Scouts Shipton, Birtwistle, and Tomlinson. At half-term, despite very discouraging weather, five members completed First Class journeys. This was a very good show. Some work was done on repairs to the Scout Hut, and we hope to complete our quota during the Christmas holidays.

"B" TROOP SUMMER: CAMP

Despite the protests of the Group Council, the Parents' Committee and the rank and file, the S.M. refused to be diverted from another Arran adventure; so the Kit List was revised to include life-jackets, water-wings and gumboots, and the advance party was carefully instructed by the pioneer section on methods of pitching tents up trees.

We need not have worried; the weather was glorious. . . . The site commanded an excellent view of the Firth of Clyde, and was backed by precipitous cliffs which afforded protection against the wind and ample opportunities for Wide Games. These latter were many and various.     .

Nearer home we played stumps and did a good deal of training. The Staff invented a new game involving the Q.M. table, and it was only at great hazard of life and limb that patrols were able to draw grub. The evenings, which were generally chilly, were enlivened by various raiding games and by the institution of a Host Patrol. Nightly the duty patrol kept a good fire going and brewed cocoa for the Troop. There followed an impromptu sing-song at which the Staff tried to teach the Troop new Gang Show songs, and despite such handicaps as Clifie's voice the Troop left camp with four new songs well and truly learnt.

The Troop outing took place in reasonable weather Goat Fell was duly climbed: the Staff toured the island's putting greens: the S.M. broke an outstanding Troop record, involving the consumption of a certain popular commodity: Scouts Duke and Goodfellow camped on an uninhabited island: several scouts completed First Class badges: there were camp fires.

The night Wide Game seemed to have disappeared from the programme. The Troop was thankful. The Troop ought to have known better. One night a couple of Scottish Rovers appeared on the hills behind the site, contacted the Troop by Morse, and eventually came down for a brew with the Staff. A scheme was evolved and the Staff spent the next day telling blood-curdling stories to the Troop about Scottish Nationalists.

At dusk that night two small scouts were despatched to the farm to collect some bread, and were kidnapped en route. At prayers their absence was pointed out to the Troop, and broad hints brought to their notice a line of bodies silhouetted against the sky. After an exciting moorland chase the party went to ground in a pine forest which was practically impenetrable, and some excellent stalking practice resulted. We got back to camp about 2 a.m. tired but very happy.

The weather was kind right to the end, and packing up was easy. Even the railways played their part and had the main body back in Sheffield in the early afternoon. It was a most enjoyable camp and, we hope, the forerunner of many more like it.

D. J. W.

"C" TROOP

WE started the year without a Scoutmaster, but under the able leadership of two Sixth Formers, D. T. Crisp and A. Copley, to whom we are indeed grateful, the Troop was kept going in difficult times.

The Easter term began with a Jumble Sale, the proceeds of which helped towards the Summer Camp. The Troop had a good attendance at the annual St. George's Day service, and a few scouts acted in the Coronation Pageant.

Whit Camp was held at Wykeham, near Scarborough, where we were visited by many parents. Less welcome was a visit from a herd of cows, which retreated leaving a trail of torn tents. For Summer Camp we decided to go south, and found a pleasant site at Sidmouth in South Devon. Good weather enabled us to have several excursions and enjoy much sea bathing.

At the beginning of the Winter Term we welcomed Mr. O. R. Johnston as our Scoutmaster. Alan Copley and Trevor Crisp now hold A.S.M.'s warrants, though they are both away at Durham University during term. A recruiting campaign of formidable proportions was staged during the first few days of the term, and the membership of the Troop has increased by fourteen as a result. All these scouts are now pressing on towards Second Class.

Despite inclement weather, a memorable Court of Honour Camp was held at half-term in a remote valley off the Upper Derwent. A varied programme of Troop and Patrol activities has been undertaken on Saturday afternoons, and plans are already afoot for Whitsun and Summer camps, at which we hope for hundred per cent. attendance.

All four P./L.s and four other scouts of senior age are leaving the Troop at Christmas, so there are now a few more vacancies in our ranks. We look forward to good scouting in the New Year.

P./L.

 I should like to say how much I have enjoyed this first term's scouting with " C " Troop. The Troop has a fine tradition of good scouting, as I discovered when I was a guest at the 10th Anniversary Dinner at Bamford on September 12th. We are sorry to be losing our eight

over-15s" this Christmas-the four Patrol leaders especially deserve thanks for the fine job they have done during this last term. I am also grateful to T./L. Guenault and Ian Credland for the valuable assistance they have given at Troop meetings.

O.R.J.

Swimming

FIXTURES this term have been confined to three home engagements and all three matches were won by the School. On October 2nd, a senior team defeated the Old Edwardians 32 30. In a three-cornered match on November 21st, against Nether Edge G.S. and Central Technical School, K.E.S. scored 422, Nether Edge 382, C.T.S. 25 points. The third match on November 28th was against High Storrs G.S. and resulted in a victory for K.E.S. 75-42. Congratulations are due to A. Weston who has twice broken his own record in the 100 Yards Back Stroke and established a new time of 64.6 seconds.

One Water Polo match was played on November 4th when the School defeated Sheffield University by 4 goals to 3. In the House Water Polo League, Chatsworth have secured a two-point lead.

Attendance at training periods this term has not been sufficiently regular, particularly among the Thirds and Fourths; improvement is expected. Thanks are due to Mr. Watson for his ready co-operation and to D. R. Robinson, the School captain.

J. B. A. B.

Badminton

THIS term has seen the development of a really keen spirit among our record number of 36 members. We now have a doubles ladder, long overdue, and a regular supply of good quality shuttles available on a penny hire system. The one club racket, also on hire for one penny, has just about covered the cost of its own repair.

The School team, largely composed of new and inexperienced players, has exceeded all expectations. We have managed to win all our matches

after many hard struggles, and we look forward with more confidence to return matches and further fixtures next term. Also next term both the Singles and Doubles Knock-out competitions will be held, and we would like to see more pairs join the doubles ladder.

We are very grateful to Mr. Sinclair for his encouraging and enduring support. F. G. N.

Fives

THERE have been two new developments in the Fives Club this year; the club subscription has been reduced to one shilling, and the Eton Fives courts have come into use. During the long vacation the Eton Fives courts were cleared, and this term the service-lines have been repainted. We are indebted to Mr. Wrigley and Mr. Henry for explaining and demonstrating the rules and play of this elder branch of the game. Several senior players have practised Eton Fives and have found that the speed and stamina required in Rugby Fives are no substitute for subtlety in a game played around a many-faceted buttress.

We have been fortunate in enjoying a comparatively dry autumn this year, but disappointingly few younger boys have taken up Fives. There will be a competition open to Middle and Junior School boys, as well as the Senior competition, next term, and we hope there will be enough entrants to make it interesting. Fives is inevitably a game for the few rather than the many, but it does provide an opportunity for the agile boy to compete on even terms against burly opponents.

C.A.R.

Cross Country Teams

Autumn Term results:—

SENIOR

Nov. 21 v. Rowlinson Secondary School (away) Won 32-52 (2. Melbourne, 4. Timperley).

Nov. 28 v. Manchester G.S. (away) Lost 48—30 (2. Perrett, 5. Tebbet).

Dec. 5 v. Rotherham (home) Won 18-20 (3. Perrett, 4. Melbourne, 5. Elliott).

Dec. 9 v. High Storrs (home) Lost 41-37 (1. Elliott, 25 min. 15 sec. new record; 4. Perrett).

Dec. 12 v. Bradford (home) Won 36-44 (3 equal, Elliott, Edwards and Tebbet).

JUNIOR
Nov. 21 v. Rowlinson Secondary School (away) Won 28-56 (1, Andrew, 2. Findlay, 3. Vinall).

Dec. 12 v. Bradford G.S. (home) Lost 48-30 (4. Biggins, 6. Bruster, 7. Findlay).

Football

 THE season, so far, has been a bad one for the School football teams. The Under 15, Under 14, and Under 13 sides have done reasonably well, but the senior sides, especially the First XI, have had their worst season for many years. It is to be hoped that the results improve during the Spring term.

FIRST XI

As stated above, the First XI is doing badly; only four matches have been won and three drawn of the twenty played. Without searching for excuses, it must be said that we have been rather unlucky in the way of injuries. Rowbotham, the captain, has missed nearly half the matches, and otherwise regular members. Staniforth, Grantham and Heritage have been absent for varying periods. Injuries in schoolboy football are very popular these days; twenty years ago there were no such things. The main factors towards the lack of success have been lack of speed and lack of stamina. After leading 3-1, the match against Manchester should never have been lost. Nevertheless, there has been a marked dislike to any lapping the Close during training. If boys are not fit at 17, then they will never be fit.

The side, of course, has often been changed in order to find the best blend, and some boys have played in two or three positions. Others have had a chance in the team, but have been unable to command a regular place. By now, the side is more or less settled.

Rowbotham was the only Colour remaining from last year. He has not been fully fit, as is only to be expected; but his ball control has deteriorated from last season's high standard. His heading and shooting are good, and he gives plenty of vocal urge to his side. Two points of criticism; his elbows are still prominent, and his retirements to the wing are getting too frequent.

Bruce has kept goal well, except for one horrible spell in November. His bringing down of a high ball is excellent, and his goal-kicking has brought much favourable comment.

Cook is Vice-captain and Rowbotham's deputy. He plays hard but becomes ruffled when things are not going well. Parfitt has figured at outside right and full-back; the latter is his better position. Swain came into the side at left back; he is now centre-half and is improving with every game; his heading, like that of Wray, is very good. Wray is now at wing-half along with Youle. Wray is for attack at all times, but his final passes often go astray. Youle works the ball well, but often wants to beat one man too many.

Grantham started at left-back and then moved up to left-half and was doing much better there, when his knee was badly injured. He will be needed again. Staniforth is at centre-forward; he heads and distributes the ball well, but, as he well knows, is just a yard too slow. Heritage has been rather a disappointment at inside-forward. He shoots hard but does not seem inclined to do any grafting, or chase a ball a few yards away from him.

Parfitt, Laycock and Scholey have played at outside-right. This position is still open for someone to make his own, although outside-left is the sore spot. The dearth of good left-footers continues; Tebbet has been the most successful, mainly because he never gives up. His example could be well followed by other players. Perret, Bradshaw, Kaye and Wells have also played on occasions.

So now to the second half of the season. A little more team spirit and will to win (as was shown against City Grammar School, when several reserves played) and we should be much better.

RESULTS

Sept. 12 v. Old Edwardians 1st XI. Home. Lost 5-1.
Sept. 19 v. Barnsley G.S. Away. Lost 6-0.
Sept. 23 v. Keighley's XI. Home. Lost 4-2.
Sept. 26 v. Huddersfield Amateurs. Away. Draw 2 2.
Sept. 30 v. J. B. Brown's XI. Home. Won 5-2.
Oct. 3 v.:Maltby G.S. Home. Lost 2-1.
Oct. 7 v. Chesterfield G.S. Away. Lost 4-2.
Oct. 10 v. Sheffield Falcons. Home. Won 7-1.
Oct. 14 v. High Storrs G.S. Away. Draw 0-0.
Oct. 17 v. Mansfield G.S. Away. Lost 3-2.
Oct. 24 v. Bootham School. Home. Won 5 0.
Nov. 7 v. Maltby G.S. Away. Draw 1-1.
Nov. 11 v. Woodhouse G.S. Away. Lost 6-1.
Nov. 14 v. Manchester G.S. Home. Lost 4-3.
Nov. 21 v. University. Home. Lost 5-3.
Nov. 25 v. Old Edwardians 1st XI. Home. Lost 5-1.
Nov. 28 v. Firth Park G.S. Home. Lost 3-0.
Dec. 2 v. Training College. Home. Lost 6-3.
Dec. 5 v. Carnegie College. Away. Lost 4-1.
Dec. 12 v. City G.S. Away. Won 4-0.

Played 20, Won 4, Drawn 3, Lost 13, Goals for 44, Against 63.

Scorers: Rowbotham 10, Staniforth 10, Heritage 5, Tebbet 4, Wells 3, May 3, Parfitt 3, Laycock 2, Perret 1, Youle 1, Spir 1, own goal 1.

C.H.H

SECOND XI

The team started the season disastrously, losing four of their first five games. Unfortunately the composition of the team has been very inconsistent and this has made games much more difficult than they need have been. The best summary one can make of the season so far is that it has been very happy but somewhat unsuccessful. The team has played good, but slow football. We congratulate Scholey, Wells, and Bradshaw, who have played well and won promotion on some occasions to the School 1st XI. Here are brief summaries of the outstanding games

Barnsley: lost 2-9. The team was completely out-classed and out-played by a fast, small, side. No spirit of resistance developed in the School XI.

High Storrs: won 3-2. An inconsistent game in which a half-time lead of 2-0 was nearly reversed during the second half. The team was a cohesive force.

Trojans: draw 2-2. A hectic game in which a 2-0 deficit was deservedly overcome. School XI played good attacking football against a fast big side.

Maltby: draw 4-4. Here one saw a three-goal lead gradually narrowed until finally an easily earned point was won. Once the team developed that link between defence and attack, the whole nature of the game altered.

Manchester: won 4-3. What a close victory this proved to be! Losing 3-1, and that now instinctive recovery began, successfully in this case, to snatch victory in the last few minutes. Manchester's forwards need only blame their own poor shooting for this result.

Bootham: won 2-1. The heading to the day went-a good time was had by everyone! After our hosts had plied us so well with everything, what could we do but win? An excellent hard-fought game in which School just held their midfield lead, and just carried home the shooting honours. Jackson scored both goals from the left wing position.

Training College: lost 2-3. An unfortunate ending to a very fine match, for the School proved the better footballing side. Haddock's bullet-like volley shot, to bring the score to 2-2, was well worthy of mention.

City Grammar: won 11-2. It was obvious from the start that this was a match which School would win. Consequently there was a tendency to take matters easily; an attitude remedied during the second half when seven goals were scored.

Scorers: May 9, Frost 5, Scholey 4, Wells 4.

Team: Parsons, Watkinson, Bradshaw, Ward, Spir, Cliffe, Frost, Nuttall, Wells, Anderson, Laycock, May, Haddock, Jackson, Scholey.

RESULTS

Played 16, Won 6, Drawn 2, Lost 8.                                                                                                                                                     

v. Old Edwardian

 Home

 Lost

0-5

v. Barnsley G.S.

Home

 Lost

2-9

v. High Storrs

 Away

Won

3-2

v. Maltby G.S.

Away

Lost

0-4

v. Chesterfield G.S.

Away

Lost

4-6

v. Trojans

Home

Drawn

2-2

v. Mansfield G.S.

Away

Won

4-1

v. Bootham School

Away

Won

2-1

v. Maltby G.S.

Home

Draw

4-4

v. School 3rd XI

Home

Won

5-1

v. Manchester G.S.

Home

Won

4-3

v. The Staff

Home

Lost

0-1

v. Firth Park G.S.

Away

Lost

0-6

v. Training College 2nd XI

Away

Lost

2-3

v. Nether Edge G.S. 1st XI

Home

Lost

0-1

v. City G.S.

Home

Won

11-2

J. B. S.

THIRD XI

This term's disappointing results are due largely to the fact that fixtures have been against older and heavier sides. There has been no lack of keenness in training and practice, and the eleven has been ably captained by N. Birks.

At the beginning of the season, after losing by one goal to the Central Technical College, there were two matches against a strong Training College XI in which the team played well, although losing on both occasions. In the Staff match, the vigour and guile of the older side resulted in another loss, but against Owler Lane 1st XI, on the following Saturday, the first win was recorded. After losing to a stronger Staveley 1st XI, the team travelled to Eckington, where they lost by a narrow margin in a well contested game. Another loss, this time to an Old Edwardian XI, brought us to the last Saturday of term, when the XI played their best game of the season in mud-bath conditions to beat Crosspool.

Players this term have been selected from Birks, Cooper, Foster, Newsum, Shires, Preston, Allen, Frost, Howarth, Anderson, Sharpe, Crowson, Beynon, Ward and Vague.

RESULTS

Played 9, Won 2, Drawn 0, Lost 7.

v. Central Tech. Institute  

Home

Lost

1-0

v. Training College

Home

Lost

8-4

v. Training College

Away

Lost

6-2

v. Staff

Home

Lost

5-0

v. Owler Lane 1st XI

 Away

Won

3-1

v. Staveley 1st XI

Away

Lost

7-1

v. .Eckington

Away

Lost

2-1

v. Old Edwardians

Home

Lost

7-0

v. Crosspool

Home

Won

2-0

B. G. H. G.

UNDER 15 XI

Under the captaincy of Longden the team has so far enjoyed a successful season. The setting of Tuesday afternoon games has proved an enormous boon and the team has achieved a combination sadly lacking in previous years.

The defence is generally sound and has revealed good positional sense, but all its members are guilty of hesitation and loitering in the penalty area, and this has cost goals. I want to see no more dribbling or passing across the face of the goal.

The attack is small but keen and both Winfield and Powell have scored goals because of a sheer refusal to give up when beaten in the tackle or the air. More incisive play is required from the left flank.

It is hoped that the visit of the F.A. coach will have revealed the passing weaknesses of the halves and inside forwards and inspired the whole team to use the open space to greater advantage.

RESULTS

Played 10, Won 4, Lost 4, Drawn 2, For 26, Against 25, Goal average 1.04

Scorers: Winfield 11, Powell 4, Farnell 3, Hodgson 3, Booth 2, Hague 2, Rutledge 1.

v. Barnsley G.S.

Away

Won

4--2

v. High Storrs G.S.

Away

Won

4-1

v. Maltby G.S.

 Home

Lost

0-2

v. City Boys

Home

Lost

0-2

v. Carfield

 Away

Lost

2-3

v. Southey Green..

Home

Draw

4-4

v. Maltby

Away

Won

2-1

v. Manchester G.S.

Home

Won

5-2

v. Carfield  

Home

Draw

2-2

v. Firth Park G.S.

 Away

Lost

3-6

D. J. W.

UNDER 14 XI

The team has had a successful term, losing only two of the nine matches played. We have been fortunate in having a number of good reserves available when needed and this has led to keen competition to obtain a place in the team, and to an improvement in the general standard of play. Coached games with the Under 15 XI on games afternoons during the term have brought about a considerable improvement in speed, covering and positioning, which are now very good and have been largely responsible for the team's success.

Evison has captained the team well. He is an able and enthusiastic footballer who has communicated his enthusiasm to the team and done much of the scheming in the forward line. I should, however, like to see him doing more foraging.

Pike, at centre-forward, has scored nineteen goals, which is a tribute both to his marksmanship and to the service he has received from the remainder of the forward line.

Bailey, Challenger and Jones have formed the half back line in every game, with Ollerenshaw, Hancock and McAteer playing keenly to establish themselves as full-backs, and Hill has been a very reliable goalkeeper. The whole team may be pleased with the standard it has reached.

Scorers: Pike 19, Evison 5, Challenger 3, Newsom 2, White 2, Clark 2, Manterfield, Hill.

 RESULTS

Played 9, Won 5, Drawn 2, Lost 2, For 35, Against 17.

v. Barnsley G.S.

Home

Lost

0-2

v. High Storrs G.S.

 Home

Won

3-1

v. Maltby G.S.

 Away

Won

6-0

v. Carfield S.S.

Home

Draw

4-4

v. Owler Lane S.S.

 Away

Won

7-1

v. Maltby G.S.

Home

Won

1-0

v. Eckington G.S.

Away

Lost

2-5

v. Carfield S.S.

Away

Won

11-3

v. Firth Park G.S.

Home

Draw

1-1

J. C. H.

UNDER 13 XI

After a lapse of a year or two, this team has been revived, and has made a promising start with comfortable victories over High Storrs and De La Salle College. In their third match, however, they were well beaten by Firth Park, whose experience of football on muddy pitches appears to be more extensive than that of our side. Consistent form combined with talent has been shown by Andrew, the captain, Davis, and Crowson; the others have done their best.

Scorers: Andrew 3, Dalton 2, Dakin 2, Findlay, Needham, Crowson.

RESULTS

v. High Storrs

Won

5-1

v. De La Salle

Won

4-2

v. Firth Park

Lost

1-3

J. D. S.

RUGBY

The enthusiasm and determination with which the 1st XV has played and practised has been defeated by their psychological inability to win, as the record, which is here hastily passed over, would show. With what is now a very respectable fixture list, the opposition has proved tough, but the team has greatly improved in technique, and could it but have found that extra bit of confidence and thrust, instead of playing slightly worse than their opponents whatever standard these had attained, they might have won many of the games they actually lost.

The forwards have developed into quite a good pack but their line-out work could be improved and their heeling speeded up. Their tackling in the open is better, though the close defence round the scrum is weak. Slow heeling makes it difficult for the rather unpractised half-backs and is holding up the threequarter line. The backs have been disappointing, the main strength lying in the wings who rarely see the ball. The centre has been the main trouble, for quite apart from thrust and penetration there has sometimes been poor handling. Lack of practice has denied us that co-ordinated sweep of the whole line from Out Half to Wing which should be possible in school rugby. Defence here has also been weak, mainly through lack of confidence and only some sound play at full-back has saved us from further ignominy.

The Colts side is quite promising and with a welcome increase in the numbers of those playing on Wednesdays it is hoped that next year's team will be even better than this year's despite the large number of leavers.

W.D.C.

Junior Rugby

There has been much enthusiasm and good progress this term. Shortage of numbers is a handicap, but the keenness of the "regulars and the gradual addition of newcomers are very excellent signs.

M. F. W. L.

SENIOR GAMES

An innovation this season has been to have Graded Games on some afternoons, when teams of equal merit have battled with each other, in what has proved to be ideal soccer weather. The scheme worked well at the beginning of term and some improvement in the standard of football has been observed. Later in the term, however, gaps in the teams have proved a difficult obstacle, and have upset the arrangement of the games.

In House Leagues, Haddon are proving consistent scorers; in particular piling on pressure in one game, which shall go unmentioned, when they declared at fifteen goals to three! Lynwood and Wentworth both playing well one apparently up and coming, the other down and going follow three points behind the leaders.

Room has been found for seven-a-side practices in Rugby, and these have proved very popular, winning over more supporters for the "oval" game. Runners, too, have increased in number, and have enjoyed a term of varied runs and activities. One added wish for a fine January morning, when Clumber and Welbeck meet in the Knock-out Final; both Houses having had a strenuous struggle to reach this great event, we look for a real cup-tie exhibition.

SENIOR LEAGUE

 

W

D

L

For

Agst

Pts

Haddon

4

1

0

28

13

9

Lynwood

2

2

1

18

10

6

Wentworth

3

0

2

15

14

6

Welbeck

2

2

1

15

22

6

Chatsworth

1

2

2

11

13

4

Sherwood

1

2

2

9

11

4

Clumber

0

3

2

16

19

3

Arundel

1

0

4

12

22

2

G. I.

 MIDDLE SCHOOL GAMES

It has been felt for some time that with a large number of House games being played, insufficient time has been devoted to coaching in this age-group. In an attempt to remedy this, we have cut down the House League programme and introduced a number of coached games. For this purpose, boys were divided into groups of roughly equal ability, and each group, of about 25 boys, was put in the charge of one master for training for six or seven weeks.

This experiment has had some success. It has resulted in much more even matches, and masters have been able to advise during the course of a game, to make positional changes, and to concentrate on positioning, passing, and particular aspects of the game.

The inter-house football has consisted of two Half-Leagues. Each House has played three others and the champions (Chatsworth and Wentworth) are due to meet in the Final next term.

J. C. H.

JUNIOR GAMES

Owing to the length of the term and the fine weather, we have had an exceptionally good season, only one Thursday being wet. Even then we were able to finish the games. The Junior League programme has been completed and a Form Championship for 1st and 2nd years decided. Form 2(2) won their section with both 1st and 2nd XIs.

The new entry gives an impression of being of rather moderate quality; there are fear outstanding players. It is to be hoped that they will show an improvement next year.

JUNIOR LEAGUE

1 st XI

P

W

D

L

Pts

Welbeck

7

7

0

0

14

Haddon

7

5

1

1

11

Chatsworth

7

3

3

1

9

Lynwood

7

4

1

2

9

Sherwood

7

3

0

4

6

Clumber

7

2

1

4

5

Arundel

7

0

1

6

1

Wentworth

7

0

1

6

1

2nd XI

         

Welbeck

7

6

1

0

13

Sherwood

7

5

1

1

11

Arundel

7

4

1

2

9

Chatsworth

7

4

1

2

9

Clumber

7

4

0

3

8

Lynwood

7

1

I

5

3

Haddon

 

1

0

6

2

Wentworth

7

0

1

6

1

                                              H. T. R. T.        

 House Notes

 ARUNDEL

This term it has been our pleasure to welcome Mr. Bramhall as Housemaster in succession to Mr. Wallis. Owing to the fact that several promising Fifth formers left at the end of the Summer term our activities in sport have not been as good as usual. Haddock has captained a keen Senior football team, but a lack of experience is obvious. Led by Winfield, the Intermediate team has played three league matches and has not suffered any heavy defeats but has only gained one point. Board, our Junior captain, has not led his team to many successes but he and other members of his team show definite promise. In the Knock-out, a very young Arundel team lost to Clumber in the first round after extra time. Water Polo offers more joyful news; at the moment the team is second in the League, and Helliwell has induced much enthusiasm in this sport. In the more barbaric variety of football, Helliwell, and on occasions Garb, have played for the School XV. School soccer is entirely in the hands of Arundel, Rowbotham being Captain and Cook, secretary. These two are to be congratulated on their appointments as Prefects, and Orton, our House secretary, on being made a sub-prefect.

CHATSWORTH

We have been glad to welcome Mr. Surguy as a House Tutor; although he is not on regular games duty, he has proved a great help in other directions and is now occupied in getting the House Record up to date. Our only outstanding achievement so far has been Elliott's fine performance in breaking the record for the present Cross Country course, which has been in existence for three years. (The record for the old course was held by a member of Chatsworth, D. C. Law, who recently became a world record holder). Our Middle School football team have won all their matches so far and should win their section of the League. The Junior has won more matches than it has lost, and there is no need for any anxiety over the House's future footballing. The Seniors have only won one match-largely owing to our inability to get moving until ten minutes after the kick-off, and also to a large slice of bad luck. The Water Polo team has continued its good work of the last few years. They have only conceded one goal in five matches, and now seem practically certain to win the League for the third successive year. A House Social was held towards the end of term, and the programme, based on the usual lines, gave everyone an enjoyable time. We congratulate A. W. Scholey and G. H. Foster on being awarded House Football Colours; and the following who have played for School teams Wray, Scholey, 1st XI: Cliffe, 2nd XI: Foster, Howarth, 3rd XI; Saunders, Farnell, Hodgson, Under 15 XI; 'Newsom, Ollerenshaw, McAteer, P. Clark, Under 14 XI; Elliott, Singleton. Cross Country: Cousin, Rugby XV.

CLUMBER

Our football this term has been of very mixed quality: in the League we have lost all the matches we have played. but we have reached the final of the Knock-out, where, with our present team, the promise of success is high. We congratulate Heritage and May on being chosen for School teams. Four of our members now play for the School Rugby XV, and w e should have a good chance of winning the end-of-term seven-a-side tournament. The Water Polo team has not lived up to its original promise, but has played quite well, lying second now with Arundel and Sherwood: Wright, Brookes and Green have made their mark in the School swimming team. A Social for the younger boys was successfully organised, with help from various senior members. who did good work and, we imagine, enjoyed the films as much as the 1st and 2nd Forms. It is with great regret that we bid farewell to Mr. G. J. Cumming, for five and a half years Housemaster of Clumber. We wish him the very best of luck in his future career, and we welcome his successor to Clumber, Mr. Birkinshaw.

HADDON

We welcome Mr. Burridge as House Tutor he has already given valuable help to the Water Polo team. In football we have been really successful: the Senior team, led by Dickinson, is top of its League and has vet to be defeated. In the Knock-out we beat Chatsworth 4-2 in the first round, but were unlucky to lose 2-3 to Welbeck in the Semi-final. The whole of the Senior team has played with skill and enthusiasm on every occasion, and sets a good example to the rest of the House. The Middle 1st XI has the modest record of winning two games out of three played. This team, captained by Hague, plays well and should provide a sound Senior team for the future. The Junior 1st XI, captained by Ellis, has the same excellent record as the Senior team, having won 5 and drawn 1 out of 6 games played, and the future of this section looks very rosy. We congratulate Grantham and Bruce on becoming regular members of the School 1st XI; Birks, Frost, Cooper and Crowson play regularly for the 3rd XI, and Hague for the Under' 15; Evison (Capt.), Challenger. White and Pike for the Under 14, and Crowson (Jnr.) and Davis for the Under 13. Lambert and Beynon play for the School Rugby XV. In Water Polo we have won 1 and drawn 1 out of 4 games. We feel the loss of Williamson and Hollingworth (who is indisposed) in this section, but the team drawn from nine people plays enthusiastically and we look forward to better results next term. The support for this team is disappointing, more junior members, who will form future teams. should turn out to support us. The House Social was a great success, enjoyed by all who attended; the House thanks all those who helped to organise, especially the mothers who sent enough food for two socials. We congratulate I. R. Credland on being appointed a Sub-prefect; and must say goodbye and good luck to Edwards. Tummons and Joel, whose loss we shall feel in all the realms of sport.

LYNWOOD

At the end of the year many of our older members left, and this has had considerable effect on all senior teams. In the Senior league Laycock and Spir have done admirable work. although the team as a whole has not played as well as it might have. Although we lost to Welbeck in the Knock-out, it was a good match and we need not complain. Both Findlay and Rutledge have done their jobs well, although these teams, especially the second elevens, should try a little harder, and we hope to see better results next term. Twyford, Protheroe and Mallet are regular School 1st XV Rugby players, and we hope to repeat last year's success and win the seven-a-sides again. The Water Polo team has not played as well as expected, although the notable win over Clumber shows what they are capable of . . . and there is still the Knock-out.

SHERWOOD

We have had great pleasure in welcoming Mr. Hemming who, as mentioned in our last House Note, was appointed Housemaster in succession to Mr. Claypole; and also Mr. Wastnedge as House Tutor. E. J. Hudson and F. G. Newsum have been appointed Sub-prefects, and D. R. Robinson School Swimming captain. A truly great honour, in the form of Hastings Scholarships at the Queen's College, Oxford, has been gained by E. J. Hudson and J. W. Thompson-a just reward for their efforts and an admirable example to the rest of us! This term the Junior football is on the border-line. After easily winning more than half the matches, we appear to have collapsed under pressure from Welbeck. The spirit is keen and promising well for the future, and we regret not being able to have the practice which so many requested. The Seniors had rather a bad start, but gradually improved, and we expect them, next term, to be more settled from the beginning. Our best performance has been in Water Polo; our inexperienced team have concentrated and only lost one game. We thank our very able leader. D. R. Robinson, who has scored nine goals in four matches.

WELBECK

If the fortunes of the Senior football team have been rather changeable, we can take comfort from the success of the Junior XIs, who have won all their matches except one, which was a draw. In several years' time these boys will be senior members of the House and should be sufficiently experienced to win both the Knock-out and the League; on more than one occasion the number of goals scored has reached double figures and this bodes well for future school 1st XI's. The Senior 1st XI drew their first league game with Lynwood, but in the second round Haddon were given the chance to increase their goal average to startling dimensions as a result of some rather unorthodox goal-keeping! Not to be outdone, however, the team won the next two matches, and so proved to the rest of the House that there are some competent footballers in the team. Seven members of the House have played for the School 1st XI and it is not surprising that the Knock-out team have fought their way to the final. In the first round Lynwood did not present very formidable opposition; in the second we met Haddon, whose league team were meeting with considerable success. Leading 3 0 at half-time, the team seemed to rest on its laurels until Haddon had scored two goals. There was great excitement in the last few minutes; only fearless goal-keeping on the part of Kaye prevented Haddon from scoring the equaliser. In Water Polo, in spite of the fact that the House is at the bottom of the League, the standard of play has undoubtedly improved. On more than one occasion we have only been beaten by a narrow margin, and it can be truthfully said that bad luck has played its part in preventing our winning a match. We look forward to the time when we can turn out a team as formidable as that of 194T. Finally, we offer our welcome to Mr. Gibbs as House Tutor.

 WENTWORTH

The football season has started quite well for Wentworth with a number of League victories for the Seniors, though in the Knock-out, after a resounding 7-1 first round victory, we were defeated by Haddon in the second round. A feature of the League games this term has been the performance of Hutchings at centre-half, and the prolific goal-scoring of centre-forward Hamilton. The Middle teams have played consistently well, having now reached the play-off of the League, and should form firm foundations for the future. We have been well represented in the School teams with Swain in the 1st XI and Wells and Bradshaw in the 2nd XI. The appearance of Melbourne and Timperley in the School Cross Country team augurs well for our prospects in the coming season. The Water Polo team has had a fair start, and we hope that Horsefield, ably supported by R. Harris in goal and the rest of the team, will be even more victorious next term. Finally we congratulate Edlington on being made a Prefect and Cunnington a Sub-prefect.

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