King Edward VII School Magazine

Vol. XI. July, 1946 No. 12.

CONTENTS.

 

PAGE

 

PAGE

SPEECH DAY

179

HOUSE NOTES

194

VALETE

182

OLD EDWARDIANS

197

THE ORCHESTRA

183

CROSSWORD

198

THE CHOIR

183

NOTICES

198

HISTORICAL EXCURSION

183

   

DEE CLUE

 

ILLUSTRATIONS.

 

OXFORD LETTER

184

G. R. MILNER IN THE HIGH JUMP facing page

188

MEMORIES OF THE MAQUIS

185

START OF THE OPEN 100 YARDS facing page

188

EPISODE IN THE LIFE OF AN "’ERB"

186

THE ATHLETIC TEAM facing page

188

SWIMMING, 1946

187

DETAIL PROM DRAWING

 

ATHLETICS

188

BY J. M. WOODWARD (5B)

 

SCOUTING

189

   

JUNIOR SCHOOL

190

DRAWING BY D. CATTELL (J1.B)

 

CRICKET

192

DRAWING BY T. F. BAYLIS (TR.) facing page

189

SPEECH DAY

JUNE 27TH, 1946.

THE familiar routine of this annual occasion was carried out in an unusually genial, not to say hilarious, atmosphere, attributable partly to the sincere and friendly presence of the Lord Mayor as Chairman, and to his agreeable speeches and interpolations partly to the charming and memorable address given by the principal guest, Mr. J. T. Christie and partly, perhaps, to a general sense of the opening of a new chapter of life and opportunity for the School, and release from the stress and tension of the past years.

The incidental items, especially these contributed by the Choir, were highly, and deservedly, appreciated; the Latin Speech was safely negotiated and P. Barthorpe’s reading of a passage of Burke fully justified his election as the first holder of the new "Spoken English" Prize.

The HEADMASTER opened his report with a survey of the general conditions lender which the School had been working during the war years—the "home service" period, the "double shift" period, and the continual changes of Staff due to the requirements of war service. In May, 1940, sixteen masters were liable to be called up by the following August, and since that date sixty-seven appointments had been made.

In March, 1941, Miss Daft made history by being the first lady to be appointed to the Senior School Staff, and since then a further twenty ladies have joined us, I would like to acknowledge here the debt of gratitude which the School ewes to them. It is not easy at any time for ladies to teach in a boys’ school, and still less easy when there Is a home to be cared for as well. But the ladies of the Staff have done splendid work in the classroom and in such social activities as they could join in. Here I would particularly like to mention Mrs. Buckatzsch, who left us last Christmas to go to High Storrs ---a teacher of unwearying patience, sympathetic but firm, inspiring to the able boy, and a charming personality. We thank her warmly for all she did for the School and wish her every happiness when she retires at the end of this term. I knew tee that all the boys who have been to her would wish me to thank Mrs. Nott, kind but firm, getting the best from each boy by cheerful encouragement, a master of her subject and admirably clear in exposition she got very good results from some of our weaker forms. And she found time to do the shopping, look after her husband and son, and always had a cheerful word for everyone. She leaves us at the end of this term with our heartfelt thanks and very best wishes.

181

180

I should like also to pay my tribute to the boys of the School, for whom these last seven years have been a difficult time indeed; perhaps a father away from home for long periods of active service mother doing war work of some kind continual changes of Master or Mistress disturbing the continuity of work at School; extra calls on their time and energy; and at the cud of it, the probability that their career would he seriously interrupted by the claims of National Service. In spite of all these difficulties they have been splendid, as boys always are. They have worked hard, played keenly and have kept the social life of the School going with zest and enthusiasm."

The work of the Junior School had been maintained at a high standard, and owed much to Mr. Baker, "one of the finest schoolmasters I have ever known— patient, firm, a stimulating teacher, and the very soul of justice," and to Mr. Wright, now retiring after twenty-four years’ devoted service to the School, in which time his good influence on the many generations of boys whom he taught had been of great value.

Academic honours gained (luring the war included forty-six Open Scholarships and Exhibitions at Oxford and Cambridge, the record number of fourteen having been won in the year 1943-44; the Akroyd Scholarship had been won four times, the Earnshaw Scholarship three times, with fifteen other Scholarships at Sheffield University and ten State Scholarships. "Ten of these forty-six scholarships have been in Classics----a fitting tribute to Mr. George Smith, who has been the Senior Classics Master during the war, and leaves us, to our great regret, at the end of this term. Mr. Smith has been a tower of strength in many sides of the School —an inspiring teacher of the Classics (how many boys have been encouraged to start Greek because they knew they would be going to Mr. Smith?), an enthusiastic librarian, a keen ‘cellist, always willing to help with Cricket and Football, House Tutor of Chatsworth; but above all, by the breadth of his knowledge and love of all that is best in art and literature and music, making a vital contribution to the cultural life of the School. His utter selflessness and devotion have won the affection of all the boys. We are all sorry that he feels that he must give up teaching—was there ever a better school-master?—---and we wish him every success and happiness in whatever work he decides to take up, and we thank him from the bottom of our hearts for all that he has done for the School."

To Mr. Bradley and Mr. Axon, both leaving at the end of this term, the headmaster expressed the thanks of the School, especially in connection with the Athletics, in which great progress had been made in recent years; and the subject of Scouting brought him to one more leavetaking. "Mr. Gaskin was one of the founder members of the School Troop, and the excellent work they have done is due largely to his devotion and to the high standards he has sat them, particularly in camping, for which the Troop is wall known, not only around Sheffield, but all over the country. Mr. Gaskin has also been a careful Senior Geography Master and a sincere teacher of Scripture. And I would say one more thing of him his patience, his devotion to the boys who have passed through his hands, and his unobtrusive witness of the Christian faith in his daily life, have had a deep influence in the School and a permanent effect for good on the lives of some of the boys he has taught and met in the Scouts. I thank him both on your behalf and for myself for his great work for the School and wish him every happiness in his wall-earned retirement."

The Old Boys’ war record included the names of some 800 known to have served in the Armed Forces, of whom 105 had lost their lives, and 48 had gained between them sixty Decorations and Mentions in Despatches. T he quality and variety of their services was illustrated by the mention of three in particular Lieut-Commander G. G. Turner, who was awarded the George Cross and George Medal for work of outstanding courage and skill in bomb-disposal; Brigadier E. T. Williams, a brilliant administrator, and Chief Intelligence Officer on Lord Montgomery’s General Staff; and Dr. H. W. Thompson, F.R.S., Fellow of St. John’s College, Oxford, who had made distinguished contributions to Physical Chemistry and its application to industrial recesses, and bad represented the Ministry of Supply in America on a number of occasions.

"I should like to thank you, the parents of our boys," said the Headmaster in conclusion, "for all you have done to help us during the war. We rely on you for seeing that they get to School punctually, attend regularly, and do their homework conscientiously, and in all these respects you have supported us splendidly. It is also a great encouragement to us to see so many of you at our Chapel Services, at our Concerts and Plays, and at our Athletic Sports, at which attendance has been large for the last two years. May I assure you how welcome you are—I hope even more of you will come in the future. Finally may I thank the Parents’ Committee for so generously giving the balance of their funds to found a Parents’ Prize for Spoken English." It is for ethers to pass final judgment on our work during the war, but I think that we can take modest pride in our achievements and can face the future, whatever its difficulties, with courage and confidence."

The Head Prefect, I. B. D. CORNER, delivered the following address of welcome to Mr. Christie

Hoc festo die summo cum gaudio excipimus Johannem Traill Christie, virum nunc florentem non solum aetate verum etiam sapientia. Qui cum ortus est patre egregio in iure civili bene instructo tum educatione doctrinaque optima apud Wintonenses puer est institutus. Itaque Oxonii ad litterarum humaniorum studium summa cum industria summa cum diligentia se dedidit. Paucis post annis, ubi discipulos natu grandiores tres ferme annos in illo ludo Rugbeiensi instituit, quasi voce ipsa Minervae allicitus Oxonium rediit. Hic inter tot illa negotia quae socio collegii contingunt, tragoediis quoque Sophoclis illustrandis operam dedit. Quibus rebus aliquot annos prospere gestis, primum scholae Repandunensis deinde Westmonasteriensis praeses delectus est. Forsitan autem vobis notissimus sit, ut qui in numerum sapientium adlectus vulgo interroganti dulcissima voce respondeat. Viro ergo integra aetate vigenti, tantaque pueros ad virtutem dirigendi arte praedito, ut coram hoc tam augusto conventu gratias agimus, sic speramus et beneficio et doctrinae fore omnibus orationem.

The wit and charm of Mr. CHRISTIE’S address, which followed the distribution of prizes, cannot possibly be conveyed in a short summary. Winning the delighted attention of all at the outset by his disrespectful "cracks" at our own Headmaster, his former colleague, as well as by his impromptu Latin reply to the Head Prefect, he contrived to convey to all sections of his audience just such exhortations as the occasion demands, but concealed with such delicious art that the medicine was swallowed not merely without tears but with much laughter. His argument inculcated, for the boys, an ideal of well-proportioned intellectual growth, in which the enthusiasm of the specialist for his own subject, end his conception of its value, were enriched by contact with, and respect for, other kinds of knowledge or skill.

Teachers were reminded of the responsibility of example and leadership. And parents were encouraged to believe that a firm stand for their own principles would in the long run win the gratitude of their children, in spite of temporary appearances of revolt and impatience in the latter.

The principal prizewinners were:

Royal Grammar School Prize for Classics, J. A. Siddell;
Wesley College Prize for Science, G. A. Horridge and P. Lamb;
W. P. Taylor Prize for Mathematics, D. Keeton;
History, P. B. Buckroyd and G. T. Edwards;
Ancient History, E. J. Lemmon;
French, J. A. Siddell;
German, K. J. H. Crease;
Spanish, G. G. Barnes;
Chemistry, W. G. Thompson;
Physics, B. Keaton;
English Essay, N. P. Stanley;
English Poem, G. T. Edwards;
Classical Composition, L. H. Scott;
Spoken English, P. Barthorpe.

PROGRAMME.

INTRODUCTORY MUSIC

March (from "Scipio") Handel
THE SCHOOL ORCHESTRA

ONE MINUTE SILENCE IN HONOUR OF THOSE OLD EDWARDIANS WHO HAVE GIVEN THEIR LIVES FOR THEIR COUNTRY IN THE SECOND GREAT WAR

THE LATIN SCHOOL SONG

THE LORD MAYOR OF SHEFFIELD
(Alderman C. W. Gascoigne, J.P.)

Song ‘ Non Nobis, Domine" Quilter
CHOIR, SCHOOL AND ORCHESTRA

THE HEADMASTER’S REPORT

LATIN ADDRESS OF WELCOME SPOKEN BY I. D. B. CORNER, HEAD PREFECT

Distribution of Prizes amid Address by
Mr. J. T. CHRISTIE, M A
Head Master of Westminster School

Song "The Vagabond" Vaughan Williams
Madrigal "The Morris Dance" Stanford
Part-Song ... "Cargoes" ... M. Shaw
THE SCHOOL CHOIR

Reading by P. BARTHORPE
Winner of the Parent’s Spoken English Prize.

Vote of Thanks to the Head Master of Westminster,
proposed by Alderman J. H. Bingham, J.P. (Chairman of the Education Committee),
and seconded by Mr. C. E. Holmstrom (Past President of the Chamber of Commerce and Scout District Commissioner)

Song "Loch Lomond" Traditional

GOD SAVE THE KING

183

182

HONOURS WON BY BOYS OF THE SCHOOL SINCE SPEECH DAY, 1945

E. H. WEBBER: —Open Scholarship of £100 a year for Classics at Pembroke College, Oxford. Awarded £5 for meritorious work in the examination for Hastings Scholarships at the Queen’s College, Oxford.

D. KEETON: —Hastings Scholarship of £115 a year, for Mathematics and Physics, at the Queen’s College, Oxford.

J. A. SIDDELL —Hastings Scholarship of £115 a year for Classics at the Queen’s College, Oxford.

W. G. THOMPSON —Hastings Scholarship of £115 a year, for Natural Sciences, at the Queen s College, Oxford.

G. A. HORRIDGE —Major Scholarship of £100 a year, for Natural Sciences, at St. John’s College, Cambridge.

P. LAMB Minor Scholarship of £60 a year at Cambridge (declined).

K. S. ELLIS —Exhibition of £40 a year In the General Subjects Examination at St. John’s College, Cambridge.

S. G. CLIXBY Edgar Allen "A" Scholarship of £100 a year for Modern Languages tenable at the University of Sheffield.

J. B. W. KEIGHLEY:—(a) State Scholarship; (b) Town Trust Scholarship of £100 a year, awarded on the Higher Certificate Examination.

Sheffield Royal Grammar School Founders Exhibitions: —G. A. CORKILL, J. B. W. KEIGHLEY, J. ROLLIN, E. H. WEBBER.

G. T. EDWARDS —Awarded £5 for meritorious work in the examination for Hastings Scholarships at the Queen’s College, Oxford.

Sheffield Education Committee Scholarships tenable at Oxford, Cambridge, Sheffield and other Universities: —G. A. CORKILL, J. B. W. KEIGHLEY, P. B. TURNER, E. H. WEBBER, R. W. PARKER, J. ROLLIN, E. J. T. BRENNAN, K. S. ELLIS, I. G. T. DUNCAN, D. H. KAY, J. P. KENYON, J. C. NAYLOR, D. R. ROBINSON, P. WILDE, T. F. WOOD, C. K. HAYWOOD, J. S. HEMINGWAY.

Herbert Hughes Memorial Prize for Spanish G. G. BARNES.

HONOURS WON BY OLD BOYS OF THE SCHOOL SINCE SPEECH DAY, 1945

UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD.

H. W. THOMPSON, University Lecturer in Chemistry, and Fellow of St. John’s College —Elected a Fellow of the Royal Society, for distinguished contributions to Infra-red Spectroscopy and Its Industrial Application. Brigadier E. T. WILLIAMS, C.B.E., D.S.O., Fellow of Balliol College —Elected Companion of the Bath for distinguished services with the British Army of the Rhine. J. GADSBY, Scholar of Balliol College: —Awarded the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE.

J. W. TORY, Scholar of Queen’s College —Appointed Private Secretary to the Leader of the House of Lords.

OTHER HONOURS.

Dr. A. GILLIES, Scholar of Sheffield University

Appointed Professor of German Language and Literature at Leeds University.

VALETE

ALLAN BRADLEY.

In a comparatively short stay here— since January, 1937—and that interrupted by war Service in the Royal Navy, Mr. Bradley has worked with infectious enthusiasm in many capacities—teaching French and German, conducting tours abroad, training athletes, or enriching broad comedy roles in play and opera. His energy and resourcefulness would have been of great value in our post-war reconstruction period. However, these are now to be employed in the service of Elmhurst Grammar School at Street, Somerset, of which he has been appointed Headmaster. We congratulate him, and Elmhurst, on the appointment, and wish him and his family every happiness and success.

GEORGE SMITH.

Most of us probably found it difficult to believe the Headmaster’s announcement on Speech Day that Mr. Smith intended to retire from teaching; and find it even more difficult to imagine who, or what, will fill the gap which his going will leave. Each of us, colleague or pupil, will have his particular recollections of what G. N. G. S. meant to him, but all will join in thanking him for the extraordinary energy, patience, and devotion which he has lavished alike upon individual pupils and on school affairs in general. He leaves us, after thirteen years’ service, much to our regret, but with our warmest good wishes for the future.

C. S. WRIGHT.

The large number of boys that have passed through the Junior School in the last twenty odd years all owe much to the gentle and steady guidance of Mr. Wright, whose work there has made a large contribution to its traditions and continuity. His going will be a loss also to the orchestra (both our ‘cellists, alas, leaving us at once)—and if there are ever any more Staff Plays, we shall miss both Mr. and Mrs. Wright. We shall know where to find them, however; and we wish them many years peaceful enjoyment of their stately home at Eyam.

A. W. GASKIN.

Twenty-nine years is a long stretch of hard labour, and it would seem miraculous for anyone of flesh and blood to survive such a trial and yet retain a belief in the essential goodness of human nature. Yet "Gassy" has done no less after a quarter of a century at K.E.S.; and he still continues to treat all, from Staff to Second-formers, as equals and gentlemen. That is why for many of us the biggest change that this term-end will bring is his retirement from our midst. There is no need to add to the words at Speech Day of Mr. Holmstrom and the Headmaster. Maybe the pleasurable hours spent in Rooms 29 or 44 will fade from the mind of the three thousand concerned, but a whole generation of School Scouts will never forget him. On behalf of all these we wish him health and every happiness in a long retirement.

THE ORCHESTRA

ALL members have worked hard throughout the term and have taken pride in producing some good string tone in such pieces as Mozart’s Ave Verum Corpus, Handel’s March from Scipio, and Verdi’s melodies from Rigoletto. It has been pleasant too to hear the increasing refinement of tone from flutes and clarinets, and it is hoped that the solitary trumpet at present representing the Brass Wind section, will be reinforced by further trumpets, trombones, and tubas as soon as these necessary instruments are procurable.

On Sunday, June 2nd, the Orchestra and Choir (trebles only) played and sang to an enthusiastic audience at the Royal Sheffield Institution for the Blind.

P. L. B.

THE CHOIR

IT has been interesting to observe the increased confidence with which all members have sung at all times during the term, and the interest that has been shown in the singing of an underpart, not only by the Choir, but by the willing, if elusive, members of the Upper School. Thanks to the untiring efforts of the Staff and about a dozen senior boys, the Tenors and Basses have provided a steady and efficient background to the spirited efforts of Trebles and Altos in such part-songs as The Morris Dance (Stanford) and Cargoes (Masefield); but no adequate balance of tone can be expected unless at least thirty additional voices from the Transitus and Sixth forms are forthcoming next term, when it is hoped that Gluck’s Orpheus (Act II) and H.M.S. Pinafore (Sullivan) will be put into practice.

P. L. B.

HISTORICAL EXCURSION

ON 26th June a party of the Modern Sixth and Transitus was privileged to see the library of Chatsworth House. Those who made the journey had a fascinating afternoon amid a galaxy of treasures which would have bewildered but for the guidance of Mr. Francis Thompson, the Librarian, who selected for our attention a special example here and there to display against the background of attractions. We heard briefly of the building of the House by the first Duke, one of the seven who invited William III to deliver England. We saw his portrait, in the uniform of a French marshal on a white steed, and nearby the reserved, quizzical gaze of his contemporary, Trimmer Halifax. We had a glimpse of the silver room, where a case of miniatures, including one of Cromwell, brought the tour to a stand. The gold room, with its three-foot wine cooler, "now filled with fruit at Christmas," has an opulence hard to appreciate in these days. The Painted Hall, its splendid ceiling seen so clearly on a sunny afternoon, depicts the story of Julius Caesar most exuberantly.

After this introduction the Library still provided the highest effect of the visit. We saw here a book printed in Mainz before 1460, in beautiful type on magnificent paper whose broad margins are as white and clear as they were when Columbus sailed. We saw the first book printed in Italy (1465) which was also the first book with Greek type. Yet some French manuscripts, by their beautiful illustration, caused preferences to waver. The most remarkable book is one written in Winchester in the tenth century, in clear Carolingian script, its many gold illustrations still bright and clean. Perhaps most interesting in its associations was the prayerbook of Henry VII, with his written dedicatory note to his daughter Margaret. Here, too, was a Memling painting astonishingly crisp and exact in its detail, and because of the purity of the paints still brilliant after five hundred years. To look up from these, in the gallery with its small circular roof paintings and its decoration so typical of the turn of the seventeenth century, through its window on to the sunny parkland, was an experience amounting to historical education.

We had just time for a view of the formal garden, backed by the natural Derbyshire countryside beyond, and containing the great fountain made by Paxton so that the Duke of Devonshire should not be out-done by the Czar of Russia; and then we had to leave, very grateful to our guide for his long patience and his delightful commentary.

184

CINE CLUB

THE Summer Term, with its outdoor activities in profusion, enabled the Committee to take a well-earned rest from arranging film programmes for the School as a whole. Members have, however, been provided with a varied programme.

An Old Boy of the School, Lieutenant Thomas, provided the first show of the term. He showed several travel films in colour, including an extremely interesting visit to Australia. Lieut. Thomas has a surprising memory for facts and the number of different varieties of gum-tree is something all members should know!

The Central Office of Information (late M.O.I.) gave us a programme of films ranging from a preview of the latest uses for plastics (including an excerpt from ITMA!) to an attractive survey of the fen-country.

The Committee had a unique experience towards the end of the term—they were provided with a film-show given by the younger members, who, in their turn, became aware that there is more in putting on a film-show than meets the eye. Despite all obstacles, the show took place and was enjoyed by all.

On the production side, this has been a term of great activity. The filming of the "Magazine " has proceeded rapidly to keep pace with the crowd of social events which have taken place.

The Scout Birthday, Knock-Out Final, and Swimming Sports, have all been covered. Of great interest to a small group of enthusiastic young members was the occasion when the Ciné Club studio was set up on the top floor and certain incidents of School Life re-enacted for the camera.

The term, however, ends on a less pleasant note. It is with deep regret that we say goodbye to Miss Knight, who has been our President since the Club’s foundation eighteen months ago. No Society could have had a more enthusiastic leader, and it is to her untiring efforts that we owe so much of our status in the School. We wish her every happiness in the future.

T. B.C. K.

OXFORD LETTER

Dear Mr. Editor,

I’m afraid I am in the impossible position of having to write a letter about a Club of whose recent activities I am entirely ignorant. Perhaps I may then be allowed to indulge in more general terms, and leave the particulars over for another time?

Oxford began this last term amidst the cheers of the Boat Race, and is now enjoying the more topical glories of Lord’s. Between times the University has spent much of its energy (some members playing, others watching) on the various English County and Empire matches, where too it has been able to add to its creditable record. Another reminder of peace-time conditions was the festive occasion of Eights Week in May, when Trinity—true to itself—came head of the river.

But please do not misjudge us! Life this term has not been merely a matter of a cricket bat and ball; some of us, alas, have had to be content with only five afternoons a week in the Parks, for the vision of Final Schools compelled us to fill in the remaining two with other various activities. Notably Mr. Sutton was to be seen stealing quietly (and reluctantly) away from the magnificence of Donnelly, in order to punt his way up the Cherwell to the strains of Donne’s Mathematical Analysis. Thus Oxford has not been all play.

We would like to close by congratulating Mr. John Williams, now reinstated at Magdalen, on being awarded the O.B.E., and also to sympathise with Mr. Webber on being drawn away from Pembroke by the Ministry of Labour; we indeed hope to see him back again very shortly.

May we just wish the School every success in the forthcoming year. Yours very sincerely,

PETER WILLS.

185

MEMORIES OF THE MAQUIS.

We were a motley crew in the Maquis, and life was primitive and hard. Men from every great city in France, and from every station in life had responded to the call, and were preparing for the Day. Blond farmers from Normandy jostled shoulders with dark-skinned men from French Morocco, Jugo-Slavs and Russian Sailors, who had escaped from German prison camps, squatted in bivouacs along with fishermen from the shores of the Mediterranean.

The Allied Military Mission numbered five, under the orders of a Britisher who called himself Xavier. A man of extraordinary physique and of great strength of character, he had moulded le Maquis de l’Ain, together with le Colonel Romans, into a formidable fighting force. His original wireless operator was an American called Paul, and these three men, with a nucleus of patriots, had endured the terrible winter of ‘43, up in the forest of Haute Savoie, with a price on their heads. Xavier, on one occasion, had been caught by the Gestapo. After a severe beating-up, they had let him go. His cover story, manufactured in this country, had "held water."

The three remainder, including myself, left England by Dakota one moonlight night before the landings. There was Parsifal, the Surgeon, fresh from the African campaign; Yvello, a little French-Canadian, went out as assistant to Paul. The powers that be had given me the nom-de-guerre of Bayard. No mean one to live up to! My job was to instruct the young Maquissards in the use of Explosives and to ensure that they knew how to use the weapons that were dropped over to them in containers, by parachute, from time to time. Needless to say, the old campaigners were experts with their Stens and Brens, and had many German scalps to their credit.

June was comparatively quiet, and we were a far cry from distant Normandy, where the fighting had just started. However, we were completely surrounded by Jerry and he used to send patrols into our outlying villages, drawn from the garrisons of Lyons and Bourg, to our West, or from Belfort and Grenoble, to our North and South respectively. At our backs was the Swiss frontier, heavily guarded by the Germans and les douaniers, with their fierce police dogs. These patrols often comprised Mongol levies, conscripted into the German Army on the overrunning of Russia. Primitive types, with slanting eyes and wearing the round, wool cap of their breed, they often proved more bestial and cruel than their masters. Against these people we pitted the men from Morocco, renegade Italians, and the Jugo-Slavs. We deemed it wise to keep our loyal Frenchmen, who had been tested and proved their worth, until later, for the real thing. The black men were very keen on hand-to-hand fighting and so we arranged for British bayonets of the old pattern to be sent over by plane. With these, coupled with almost extravagant bravery, they hewed and slashed at those Mongols, until the enemy were forced to furnish the patrols with men of the Wehrmacht proper. The latter, with their superior discipline, gradually won back certain villages from us, but only after considerable blood-letting.

By the end of the month I had formed several equipes de sabotage and we were by now systematically cutting the railway lines running between the garrison towns and had also demolished several bridges. The Germans were furious at these exploits but could find no means of dealing with those "bandits" who would stab their sentries, shoot-up their blockhouses, and then melt away into the forests. They consoled themselves by shooting any of us immediately whom they caught (we were franc-tireurs, being armed and in civilian clothes, which prevented us from being taken prisoner) and worse still, resorted to torture, in order to find out the whereabouts of our camps. This got our hackles up, and from then onwards, all prisoners that we took had the unfortunate habit of always trying to escape!

The month’s work culminated in a brilliant ambush, organised by Xavier and Romans from their H. Q. All our weapons, many recently acquired from London, were brought into the show, and we captured and looted a whole enemy convoy, taking supplies down to the Midi, by the Rhone Valley.

In despair, Fritz bombed and shelled us, and even brought armoured vehicles into operations against us. They realised by now that we were a real menace to their lines of communication, stretching back to the Fatherland, for by now, including the forces of Jura, Ain, Savoie, Haute Savoie, and Isere, there were thousands of patriots under arms. Also they had a whiff of the pending invasion, by the Allies, of the Midi, and therefore, with two and a half divisions at their disposal, they aimed at our complete annihilation.

The greatest attack that we had ever to face began in the small hours of the 14th July (the anniversary of the fall of the Bastille). Assuming that the Maquis would be up to no good on the anniversary of that memorable day in French History, the Boches came in at us from all sides.

I was awakened in the small hours by a sentry, dressed myself as quickly as possible, snatched my carbine, and from then onwards knew no peace until the end of July. During those terrible days there was no lull in the fighting throughout all those mountains. Farmsteads were burned to the ground, men were hanged and mutilated, and the fighting was bitter as it only can be when Frenchman and German meet. It became a case of "chacun pour soi-meme" as they thrust at the very core of resistance, which, happily, kept on fighting. It could not help doing so, as the Maquis, in every way, was a thing of the Spirit.

My appearance must have been rather frightful. Shot through the shin and in the arm, my shirt was dirty and bloody and I was forced to go unshaven. Fortunately, for three days I ‘‘went to earth," as the enemy came through and beyond our particular sector. Farmers sheltered me, I cleaned my wounds, and tried to sleep. But it eluded me. The chugging of a motor bike would bring me to my feet, waiting for the fateful knock on the farmhouse door.

Grace a Dieu, bad things as well as good come to an end. The attack spent itself, leaving many dead and dying on both sides. We were once more able to gather around Romans our leader and Xavier his British advisor.

After a fortnight’s respite, news came through of the American landing in the Midi. Slowly and relentlessly the German Army was pushed back up the Rhone Valley. Grenoble fell, Lyons was taken, and Bourg, with its beautiful cathedral, liberated. And up in the mighty Juras the men of the Maquis were waiting, patiently, like wolves wait before a hunt.

At last they struck again, and once more began to rend and tear at the flanks of the invincible Wehrmacht. Swinging round, and joining forces with the conquering Americans, we pushed onwards, ever striking north, up to the Belfort Gap.

G. NORNABLE.

186

187

EPISODE IN THE LIFE OF AN "’ERB"

For the benefit of those who have previously asked me to classify an " ‘erb."

He was a specimen of humanity such as did not give optical pleasure. We used to call him by the name of Salvage. He was best described as a somewhat pasty-faced youth with blue eyes of the expressionless type, and he made use of a smirk which, when widened into a smile, revealed yellow dentals modelled on equine dimensions. But the real annoyance was directed against the manner in which he clothed himself.

He was generally met in a bright blue sports coat, tailored to add three inches to his shoulder width, and striped flannels worn with shatteringly brilliant socks. He dressed in gaudy shirts, open necked in warm weather to reveal two or three attractive shades in tide marks, and sometimes the top of his vest. When he wore ties they loudly acclaimed their presence. He matched their colourfulness with the handkerchiefs that blossomed forth from his breast pocket. His hair was glued down with applications of "The Mixture." Apparently this was bees-wax and lubricating oil well boiled with best liquid paraffin, spread on while warm, and allowed to solidify. He was unrighteously vain of a quiff-cum-wave effort constructed on his forehead.

This example of "’erbetish" barbarity was once, however, converted into a specimen belonging to normal civilisation. It happened thus:

One day, when for several weeks I had not seen him, I chanced to approach him closely before recognition dawned. I was taken aback—not being braced for the shock of seeing him soberly dressed, well scrubbed and with a look suggesting the earliest dawnings of intelligence. After this meeting I made a few discreet enquiries.

These brought to light the entrance of a beauteous damsel, on two wheels, into his life. As she cycled by him, Cupid had scented him—Cupid is blind after all and had fired an arrow truly, up wind.

His education in civilised demeanour began from that time, and this accounted for the noticeable transformation.

But alas, when (we always considered it inevitable) she deserted him, his evolution from an " ‘erb" into a respectable "Joseph" went all haywire, and he degenerated into an even lesser brand of "‘erb." What we hold against him now, is that he appears to change his shirts only once per calendar month—and also he smokes "Woodies."

G. N. W. T.

SWIMMING, 1946

WE have had a very successful season, having won all our senior matches, and losing only one colt event. We must thank Mr. Price, who attended our away matches and helped to judge the events in our own bath, for the time that he has given us.

We are, unfortunately, losing some of our best swimmers this summer, so the remaining members of the team, will not have an easy job in upholding the tradition that has been set up in the past few years. Under the able guidance of Mr. Watson, however, I am sure that the School will continue to produce an unending line of good swimmers.

Water Polo has been of a higher standard this year, but there are still members of the House teams, who do not know how to play the game correctly. I hope that House Captains will make use of Friday nights during the next two terms in which to equip their teams with the rudiments of the game.

28th May, 1946.

 

Trent Seniors ...

17 Points.

K.E.S. Seniors

34 Points.

22nd June, 1946.

 

Leeds G. S. Seniors

24 Points.

K.E.S. Seniors

32 Points.

Leeds G. S. Colts

17 Points.

K.E.S. Colts

15 Points.

29th June, 1946.

 

Rugby Seniors

8 Points.

K.E.S. Seniors

55 Points.

Trent Colts

17 Points.

K.E.S. Colts

35 Points.

Swimming Colours:— A. Ditchfield, F. G. Thorpe, T. N. Pearson, G. T. Edwards, K. Laybourn, E. Tebbett.

A. V. S.

The Swimming Sports were held in the School baths on Friday, 5th July, at 4.30 p.m. The times of most races were good, the best being that of G. B. Marsh, who broke the record in the 14-16 Breast Stroke by 0.2 sec. W. N. W. Baker, who unofficially beat the Under 14 Back Stroke record in the heats is also to be congratulated, although his swimming in the Final was rather disappointing.

The Champion Swimmer was the Captain of Swimming, A. V. Swindale, who won three events and was third in another. His nearest rival was A. Ditchfield who won one event, was second in two, and third in one.

A swimming exhibition, given by M. H. Taylor, present English Champion and Record Holder, was a great success. He demonstrated amongst other things his own method of turning when doing back stroke.

The trophies were kindly presented by Mrs. F. A. Neill.

I. D. B.C.

HOUSE COMPETITION.

1. Welbeck

335

2. Chatsworth

323

3. Wentworth

3091/2

4. Sherwood

300

4. Haddon

292

6. Arundel

2581/2

7. Clumber

238

8. Lynwood

226

CHAMPION SWIMMER.

1.       Swindale, A. V. .. ... 65

1st Free Style (Open) (3 lengths).

1st Back Stroke (Open).

1st Long Plunge.

3rd Free Style (Open) (1 length).

2.       Ditchfield, A... ... 42.5

1st Free Style (Open) (1 length).

2nd Long Plunge.

2nd Back Stroke (Open).

3rd Free Style (Open) (3 lengths).

3.       Pearson, T. N. - . - ... 30

2nd Free Style (Open) (3 lengths).

2nd Free Style (Open) (1 length).

2nd Neat Dive (Open).

188

ATHLETICS

ONCE again this year the weather was ideal, both for the Preliminary heats and for the Final Sports, which were held on 6th April. Winners’ times were very good and in most cases were better than those of last year. Also many standards were obtained, showing that running has improved in general.

The high spot of the afternoon was the exhibition of High Jumping by G. R. Milner, who broke his own and the School record with a jump of 5 feet 8 inches. He is to be congratulated on such a fine performance. Two other things are particularly noteworthy. First, the tie for Champion Athlete between P. H. Wreghitt and A. J. Parkin. Second, in the competition for the House Trophy, five houses finished with totals between 312 and 283. Amongst the younger runners, there were some good performances, particularly by A. A. Mousley and P. K. Fletcher.

Two new field events, Putting the Weight and Throwing the Discus, were introduced. They were popular with competitors, but the general standard could be considerably improved. This is the goal at which competitors should aim, for if we are to win the Northern Schools Athletics Trophy, we must obtain places in all field events.

Lynwood are to be congratulated on winning the House Championship. The final issue was not settled until their senior relay team gained second place. Corner again showed his ability to make up places, although Parkin’s performance for Clumber deservedly gave his House first place in that race.

Mr. Graham’s organisation was again as smooth as could be wished, and we owe him and all others concerned a great debt for all the trouble he so quietly and conscientiously takes. The Mistress Cutler, Mrs. S. E. Osborn kindly presented the trophies, and if the chief one went temporarily to the wrong House, nobody’s feelings were hurt.

A programme of music was provided by the Dannemora Steel Works Band.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS ATHLETICS MEETING AT THE WHITE CITY ON 26TH AND 27TH APRIL.

The five representatives of .the School gained seventh place out of sixty schools. In the High Jump, G. R. Milner amazed

the judges by not jumping until 5 ft. 4 in. was reached. Unfortunately his win was based on the number of failures and not on the height jumped. D. C. Law won his heat of the I mile steeplechase, but could have done so more easily if he had kept up with the leaders in the first lap. In the Final, after a bad start, he was fifth. In his heat of the same race, P. H. Wreghitt was placed third, but in the Final was out of the running owing to an unfortunate accident in the first lap. A. J. Parkin who entered for the 100 Yards and I Mile, reached the Semi-Final in the former, and in the Final of the latter ran very well to gain fifth place.

NORTHERN SCHOOLS ATHLETICS MEETING AT MANCHESTER ON 18TH MAY.

This meeting was held in weather which was far from suitable for athletics, with a result that few standards were obtained. Special mention must be made of D. C. Law who won the I-Mile Steeplechase easily, after taking the lead in the first lap. In the same race P. H. Wreghitt was an easy second and is also to be congratulated. G. N. W. Tilsley was very unlucky not to get a place after running third in the second and third laps. A. J. Parkin ran well in his 1/4 Mile heat, but was injured at the finish, although this did not prevent his gaining third place in the Final. D. W. Wood, who failed to qualify for the 1-Mile Final, was third in his 1-Mile heat after giving a very good demonstration of pace making. In the Final he was sixth after a sprint on the last straight. T. N. Pearson jumped well in the High Jump and was sixth. In the same event G. R. Milner rounded off an unbeaten season by winning, although the height attained was not his best. It is regrettable that others in the team who had trained very hard, were not more successful. This applies especially to Howell, Cooper, Furniss, Tilsley and Merrills, all of whom only just missed places. The School was placed third in the whole competition.

Finally we wish to thank Messrs Bradley, Woodage and Axon for all the time and help they have given for the benefit of the team. Athletics Colours have been re-awarded to G. R. Milner and A. J. Parkin and awarded to D. C. Law, P. H. Wreghitt, and D. W. Wood; and Half-Colours awarded to J. E. Cooper, G. N. W. Tilsley, and T. N. Pearson.

I.  D. B.C.

G. R. MILNER IN THE HIGH JUMP.
START OF THE OPEN 100 YARDS.
THE ATHLETIC TEAM.

Back Row—C. S. AXON, A. A. MOUSLEY, T. N. PEARSON, A. MERRILLS, H. A. BRADLEY, B. W. N. COOPER, G. N. W. TILSLEY, W. S. FURNESS, W. L. E. WOODAGE. Front Row—A. N. HOWELL, P. H. WREGHITT, G. R. MILNER, I. D. B. CORNER (Captain), A. J. PARKIN, D. C. LAW, D. W. WOOD.

189

RESULTS OF ATHLETIC SPORTS, 1946

100 YARDS (Open).—l, Parkin, A. J.; 2, Furniss, W. S.; 3, Cooper, J. E. Time—11 1/5 secs.

100 YARDS (14—16)—1, Mousley, A. A.; 2, Marsh

G. B.; 3, Hydes, J. D. D. Time—11 2/5 secs.

100 YARDS (12—14)—1, Fletcher, P. K.; 2, Stanfield, M. J.; 3, Swallow, D. W. Time— 12 2/5 secs.

80 YARDS (10—12)—1, Shaw, J. H.; 2, Edwards, C. M.; 3, Clarke, H. D. Time—l0 3/5 secs.

60 YARDS (Under 10)—1, Woodhead, A. J. K.; 2, Rowbotham, M. B.; 3, Twyford, C. J. H. Time—9 secs.

220 YARDS (Open).—l, Parkin, A. J 2 Furniss W. 5.; 3, Corner, I. D. B. Time—22 3/5 secs.

220 YARDS (14—16)—1, Mousley, A. A.; 2, Thorneloe, M. B.; 3, Roake, H. J. Time— 24 1/5 secs.

220 YARDS (12—14)—1, Fletcher, P. K.; 2, Baker R. F. W.; 3, Rothnie, N. W. Time—26 4/5 secs.

150 YARDS (10—12)—1, Shaw, J. H.; 2, Tiddy, S. C.; 3, Spir, G. Time—18 3/S secs.

Quarter-Mile (Open).—1, Parkin, A. J.; 2, Wreghitt, P. H.; 3, Wood, D. W. Time—57 4/5 secs.

QUARTER-MILE (14—16)—1, Mousley, A. A.; 2, Hydes, J. D. D.; 3, Farrell, J. D.

HALF-MILE (Open).—1, Wreghitt, P. H.; 2, Parkin, A. J.; 3, Cooper, J. E. Time—2 mm. 19 secs.

ONE MILE (Open).—1, Wreghitt, P. H.; 2, Law, D. C.; 3, Tilsley, G. N. W. Time 5 mm. 10 1/5 sec.

HALF-MILE HANDICAP—1, Parkin, H. D.; 2, Wills, C. 3.; 3, Winn, H. A.

HIGH JUMP (Open).—1, Milner, G. H.; 2, Pearson, T. N.; 3, Lawrie, D. S. Height—5 ft. 8 in. (School. Record).

HIGH JUMP (12—15)—1, Stanfield, M. J.; 2, Needham, H. W.; 3, Bingham, J. S. Height— 4 ft. 41/2 in.

HIGH JUMP (Under 12)—1, Armytage, H. G.; 2, Moore, D. H.; 3, Johnson, M. A. H. Height— 3 ft. S in.

LONG JUMP (Open).—1, Pearson, T. N.; 2, Milner, G. R.; 3, Hobson, H. W. Length—18 ft. 8 in.

LONG JUMP (12—15)—1, Maxted, A. M.; 2, Stanfield, M. 3.; 3, Tebbet, N. Length—16 ft. 6 in.

LONG JUMP (Under 12)—1, Spir, G.; 2, Armytage, R. G.; 3, May, M. 3. Length—12 ft. 21/2 In.

PUTTING THE WEIGHT (12 lb.).—1, Corner, I. D. B.; 2, Merrills, A. Distance—35 ft. 71/2 in.

THROWING THE DISCUS—1, Merrills, A.; 2, Corner, I. D. B. Distance—85 ft. 9 in.

RELAY RACE (Over 14)—1, Clumber; 2, Lynwood.

RELAY RACE (Under 14)—1, Sherwood; 2, Haddon.

RELAY RACE (Junior School) (10—12)—1, Britons; 2, Osborn.

RELAY RACE (Junior School) (Under 10)—1, Normans; 2, Angles.

TUG-OF-WAR (Over 14)—1, Clumber; 2, Haddon. TUG-OF-WAR (Under 14)—1, Arundel; 2, Sherwood. TUG-OF-WAR (Junior School).—1, Saxons; 2, Normans.

CHAMPION HOUSE, Senior School—Lynwood. CHAMPION HOUSE, Junior School—Angles. CHAMPION ATHLETES.—Parkin, A. J. and Wreghitt, P.R.

HOUSE CHAMPIONSHIP.

   

Points

 

Points

1.

Lynwood

312

5. Haddon ...

283

2.

 Sherwood

309

6. Welbeck ...

212

3.

 Arundel

307

7. Chatsworth

201

4.

Clumber

299

8. Wentworth

90

SCOUTING

"A" TROOP.

DURING the Easter Holidays a party of Seniors hiked along Hadrian s Wall in Northumberland from Hexham to Gilsand. The Hike was enjoyed immensely by all and proved a very interesting experience. The Whitsuntide Patrol Camps were a definite success, and the P.L.’s are to be congratulated on their efficient organisation. The Patrol Camp appears to be dying out of the Scout training, and it is well to bear in mind that there is no better camp than one run by a good P. L. We have accepted an invitation to return to Ross-on-Wye this summer, and shall be there from August 14th to 28th. All we ask is that we enjoy ourselves as much as we did last year. The canoe is being repaired and we look forward to many hours on the banks of the Wye.

Although we in "A" Troop are in the happy position of not yet having to say goodbye to Mr. Gaskin and Mr. George Smith, as they will be with us at camp, we should like to take this opportunity of saying how much the Troop is indebted to them. "A" Troop wishes them all the best for the future.

Any member of the Group who is in our vicinity will be very welcome to our camp at Ross-on-Wye. In particular we shall be glad to see any of the Senior Scouts who have kindly invited the Troop elders to their camp in France.

J. A. M. COOPER, A.S.M.

"B" TROOP.

As usual during the summer term, we have been chiefly concerned with camping. Our Easter Camp at Barlborough Hall was most successful and we all thoroughly enjoyed ourselves. The weather was fine and we had much amusement in the canoes and punt. One other memorable feature was the tour we made of the Hall, when we saw some very interesting details.

At Whitsuntide we again went to Barlborough; four patrols this time. The weather, except for the last day, was excellent and once more we made full use of the lake. Among the Scouting activities we combined in the programme were stalking, axemanship, bridge construction and wide games with, of course, the ubiquitous "Stumps."

190 191

As a preview to the Summer Camp this year, at Corfe Castle, we held a show of films of camp life, including one of Corfe. We thank the Ciné Club for their assistance on this occasion. The site appears very good, and is about a mile from the Sea. With the exception of two scouts, all our troop will be going, so we shall be able to have our full five patrols.

The other main event this term was the Scout Afternoon on June 29th, when despite the bad weather, patrols of "B Troop demonstrated pioneering, first-aid and mapping, and ran a highly successful ice-cream stall.

At the time of writing all but three scouts are second class, a very good position, and everyone is going ahead with first class and badge work. During the coming camp there will be many opportunities for this advanced Scouting.

Next term several changes will be evident in the troop. We are sorry to say goodbye to both Mr. Gaskin and Mr. Smith, and feel sure they take many happy memories of Scouting here. The large gap they leave is to be filled by Mr. Cumming and Mr. Harvey, to whom we wish "Good Scouting." It is not certain which of the present A.S.M.’s will be available but, under the patrol leaders we have now, the troop should continue at its present high standard.

Very few vacancies for new Scouts exist, and boys who will be Second Formers next term should apply as soon as possible.

J. S. H.

A. V. S.

JUNIOR SCHOOL

AT the end of last term we lost two very fine teachers from our staff, Miss Homer and Mrs. Smith. Miss Homer left to get married, and, as she is living in Sheffield, we have been able to welcome her back, as Mrs. Buchanan, on several occasions. We should like to assure her once more of the very high regard that we all have for her and of our hopes that she will continue to visit us as often as possible. We were very glad, too, to have a farewell visit from Mrs. Smith before she left the district to live in the South.

In their places we are lucky to be able to welcome Mrs. Nott and Mr. Wolfenden, who came to us from the Senior School. In the latter part of the term, Major Axon has also joined us to take over the physical training.

With the Common Entrance Examination behind us, it is not surprising that many of us came back with a feeling of release from tension and with thoughts more set upon cricket than upon work. But, if education is primarily the building of character, we have gone a long way towards developing the persistence which enables the English race to continue to play a game which demands sunshine just as much as do baseball and bull-fighting, in a climate alternating between tropical downpour and arctic blizzard. We have shivered in May and been rained off in June.

In the circumstances no one will expect to see a House Championship table at the end of these notes. With three matches still to be played, the Osborn and Norman 1st XI’s are equal in points. The 2nd XI position is much more open and anything may happen, if the weather is kind.

The Junior 1st XI, captained by S. R. Needham, and generally made up of ten bowlers and one wicket-keeper, has had a season which cannot be called successful, but which has not been without promise. They have usually failed to make enough runs; but it must be remembered that, against the 2nd Forms and Westbourne, they were playing boys of much higher average age than themselves. That is not to say that, with greater steadiness in batting, the matches should not have been won; for the ability is certainly there. It is simply that they have acquired the match temperament rather slowly and painfully. The return with Westbourne has still to be played, and one hopes for better things. Their fielding has always been keen, as those will appreciate who saw them on Parents’ Day: they are learning when, and how, to set an attacking field in order to make the most of their considerable skill in bowling. We all look forward to seeing many of them developing into fine cricketers in the future.

PARENTS’ DAY.

For our Open Day, we were lucky to have a fine, sunny afternoon. Thunder rumbled in the distance, but fortunately the storms kept clear of us.

How pleasant, then, to see the revival of our usual pre-war fixture, a match against a team brought over by Mr. Selby Johnson from Rotherham Grammar School. For the first time our 1st XI was playing against a team of their own age, and they made the most of the Opportunity. Needham won the toss and batted first; there were a few early shocks, but the score mounted steadily, Needham himself coming along with a stylishly played innings to steady the whole team. Everyone batted well, and if a few could have resisted the temptation to reach out at. balls outside the off-stump, the final score would have been more than 54.

Opening the attack, the quality of our bowling and fielding was soon apparent. No fewer than six of the opponents were run out, and of these the wicket was thrown down three times. Rotherham were all out for 25.

As the end had come rather early, it was agreed to play a further twenty minutes for each side. In our allotted time we lost four wickets, Downend and Needham again giving a good display. When Rotherham batted, our boys made a secret resolve to try to get them all out in the time, and are to be congratulated on taking nine of their wickets. A fine effort.

After tea, we all trooped down to the swimming baths, to see the finals of the Junior Sports. Some very good performances were put up, but one remembers particularly the neat diving action of B. Smith and the powerful swimming of H. R. Oldfield, The Saxons captain.

J. N. Honey, won the House Challenge Cup, presented by Mrs. Barton. Before the presentation, the Headmaster paid a tribute to Mr. Wright, who is leaving us at the end of the term.

Throughout the afternoon, parents had been visiting the Junior School where the great attractions were, as usual, the exhibitions in the Art and Nature Study rooms.

It is doubtful if, in any comparable School, a more varied and interesting display could be got together than Mrs. Michell contrives from local resources. Everything that swims, flies or grows seems to be collected and displayed with the greatest enthusiasm, and the coloured drawings show the interest and keenness of all the boys in her subject. The centre of attraction in the Art Room was the Saxon farm with its model buildings, fields, trees, animals and people dressed

in costumes of the period; a remarkably complete exhibition in itself of skill in handwork. The pictures on the walls, many of them showing genuine appreciation of the values of line and colour, no doubt surprised and delighted parents who probably had not suspected their young hopeful of possessing such talent.

Altogether a very pleasant afternoon with the only tinge of regret in the fact that it must be the last but one of these delightful functions.

HOUSE SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIP

1st.— Saxons

110 points.

2nd.— Angles

80 points.

3rd.— Britons

75 points.

4th.—Osborn

40 points.

5th.— Normans ...

10 points.

CRICKET LEAGUE 1946.

1ST XI’s.

   

W

L

D

Pts.

1.

Lynwood

6

1

0

12

2.

Clumber

5

2

0

10

2.

Wentworth

5

2

0

10

4.

Welbeck

4

3

0

8

5.

Arundel

3

4

0

6

6.

Chatsworth

2

5

0

4

6.

Sherwood

2

5

0

4

8.

Haddon

1

6

0

2

2ND XI’s.

1.

Arundel

6

1

0

12

2.

Lynwood

5

2

0

10

3.

Chatsworth

4

3

0

8

3.

Welbeck

4

3

0

8

5.

Wentworth

3

4

0

6

6.

Clumber

2

5

0

4

6.

Haddon

2

5

0

4

6.

Sherwood

2

5

0

4

3RD XI’s.

1.

Welbeck

7

0

0

14

2.

Arundel

4

2

1

9

2.

Sherwood

3

2

3

9

4.

Chatsworth

3

3

1

7

4.

Wentworth

3

3

1

7

6.

Lynwood

2

4

1

5

7.

Clumber

1

5

1

3

8.

Haddon

0

5

2

2

192 193

CRICKET

1ST  XI

THE 1st XI, with nearly all last year’s players, expected a successful season,

and has had one. The batting has been stronger and quicker to make runs; the attack has been as efficient as last year. Of the newcomers, Tyler has made good use of his great reach and keen eye, particularly against Wakefield, and he is severe on the loose ball Wood has been luckier this year, and has shown confidence and style. Wreghitt is still potentially the most prolific scorer in the side, but he badly needs discretion against rising balls on the off side; once established, he is formidable. Lindley is always forceful; though he too needs to respect the good ball, he has made useful scores; Lawrie is a batsman who shapes well; and Horn has made runs on occasion.

Colebrook retains his obstinacy with the bat, and his bowling has improved always whole-hearted, he has more strength this year, and has several times run through half the opposing batsmen. Merrills has sometimes bowled short, but in form he remains resourceful and hostile, as he proved against High Storrs. Lindley had the distinction of a hat-trick; he is good when he keeps off the legside; his best ball comes fast off the pitch and keeps low. Wreghitt has been a useful change bowler. Dickens has had success, often when it was most wanted; and Hunter has added the needed variety.

The ground fielding has been very good, notably at Abbeydale. Wood has excelled at cover; Horn took three notable catches at mid-off against the University II, and Lindley four slip-catches against Barnsley. Grant has taken some good catches behind the wicket Much is due to Allan’s judgment; in the field he has keyed the team to his own high standard, and he is shrewd in changing his bowlers and placing his field; it is pleasant to see that his sound batsmanship is now used with a keener eye for quick scoring; he has played many excellent innings.

C.P.R.

1ST XI Matches.

v.  Headmaster’s XI. -At Whiteley Woods, 8th May, 1946. Lost. Headmaster’s XI 143, School 92.

The School encountered Strong opposition for the first game of the season. The strength of the School bowling was apparent. Colebrook (6 for 34) especially helped to get our experienced opponents out, on a batsman’s wicket, for 143. )f or the School, Colebrook played a stolid and welcome innings of 27, but there was not enough support to back him up against some good bowling.

v. Sheffield Collegiate "A" Team. At Abbeydale Park, May 11th, 1946. Drawn. Collegiate Cricket Club 171 for 7 declared. School 148 for 7.

On a wicket which was hard and full of runs, Collegiate scored quickly for 171. The School’s fast bowlers could get no help from the wicket and Lindley (3 for 30) and Wreghitt (2 for 11) had the most success with their spinners bowled at a medium pace. Collegiate declared, leaving the School Just over 2 hours to make 172 runs in. Allan (46) set about the bowling in a very forceful manner, driving and cutting powerfully. Wreghitt, too, played soundly for his 40 not-out, as did Wood (25). But after Allan went out the rate of scoring was not fast enough to gain a win, and the School finished up 23 runs behind with 3 wickets in hand.

v. Barnsley Grammar School. At Barnsley, 15th May, 1946. Won. School 117 for 5 declared, Barnsley 20.

In their first match against a school team, the School scored a decisive victory. It was a good all round performance. Allan (59) which would have been far more had not the outfield been so poor, and Wood (31), made the runs, while Colebrook who took 5 wickets for 0 runs in 5 overs and Merrills (4 for 8) routed the opposing batsmen. The fielding too was good, Lindley ably assisting the bowlers by taking four catches in the slips, one of which was worthy of Hammond himself.

v. Sheffield University 2nd XI. At Whiteley Woods, 22nd May, 1946. School, 132 for 7 declared, Sheffield University 39.

On a hard wicket the School batted first and runs came quickly, Lindley (36) played a good aggressive innings, hitting hard and often with an exceptionally hard straight drive. Tyler (24 not out) showed his ability as a batsman with some good shots on the leg side. Allan (23) also batted confidently. When the University went in, the wicket was very cut up, and Colebrook (5 for 6) and Merrills (4 for 23) made short work of the opposing batsmen, Colebrook especially getting a lot of zip off the pitch. The fielding was again of a high standard, Horn taking two very good catches at mid-off.

v. Wakefield Grammar School, at Whiteley Woods, 25th May 1946. Drawn. School 182 for 6 declared, Wakefield 52 for 8.

This was a moral victory for the School, which would have been converted into a true one if there had been 15 minutes more play. The School batted first and although Horn was quickly out the remaining batsmen scored freely, Allan (28) played his usual stylish innings although rather troubled by balls pitched on his legs. Lindley (27) and Tyler (70 not out) then figured in a fifth wicket partnership of 60 runs. Tyler batted extremely well, scoring freely all round the wicket, and especially to leg where he obtained two sixes off full tosses. When Wakefield went in Colebrook soon had the batsmen in difficulties, as did Dickens (2 for 3), however, the Wakefield batsmen played doggedly, especially their Captain, who played a most determined innings of 24, and it was mainly due to his tenacity that the School were denied what looked like a certain victory.

v. Bradford Grammar School at Bradford, 30th Mai,, 1946. Lost. Bradford G S. 140, School 67.

This match showed the School at its worst; wickets were thrown away by rash strokes, bowling was not up to its usual high standard, and the fielding was certainly not inspired. Dickens bowled best with 3 for 24, and Wood (21) played well, he was indeed the only batsman who made the bowling look commonplace. It must be mentioned that both Wood and Tyler were out to magnificent catches.

v. Worksop College 2nd XI. At Worksop, 5th June, 1946. Won. Worksop College 26, School 107 for 1.

Worksop batted first on a pitch affected by rain.  Merrills and Colebrook soon had the batsmen in  difficulties, and there were five wickets down for  ten runs. It looked like a collapse, and sure enough  it was one, for Colebrook and Merrills skittled our  opponents out for only 26 runs. Colebrook took 5  for 9 and Merrills 4 for 16. Allan (63 not out) and  Tyler (29) proved what a useful opening pair they ,j are and they soon knocked off the necessary runs,  and incidentally figured in a partnership which  produced 86 runs. Allan batted extremely well,  his driving being a delight to watch.

v. Hallam CC. at Sandygate, 9th June, 1940. Won. Hallam 54, School 55 for 3.

Hallam produced a strong team for this eagerly awaited match. But the School were in a holiday mood and not to be intimidated. The pitch was very lively and Hallam soon suffered disaster, for they were 3 wickets down for 5 runs. Colebrook bowling fast and accurately, made the ball rise from the pitch and had the Hallam batsmen poking. Grant soon snapped up two catches behind the stumps, and Hallam found themselves all out for 54. Colebrook bowled remarkably well for his 7 for 26. Although the wicket was still tricky when the School went in. Wood (18 not out) and Allan (16) prevented any collapse, and the School passed Hallam’s score with 7 wickets in hand.

v.  High Storrs Grammar School, at High Storrs, 12th June, 1946. Won. High Storrs 23, School 48 for 6.

The wicket was sodden, but in spite of this, High Storrs who went in first, found themselves in sorry straits. Colebrook (3 for 13) and Merrill (7 for 10) made the ball pop up alarmingly and Grant again obliged with two catches behind the wicket. None of the High Storrs batsmen could make anything of the bowling, especially of Merrills and this, backed up by excellent fielding, caused their collapse. The School, too, opened disastrously, Allan was out second ball to a bail which broke at least a foot, and there were 3 wickets down for 10 runs. Then Lindley came in and averted the disaster with a breezy 21 not out, which included a straight drive for 6; the game was then abandoned because of a thunder storm.

v. Swinton C. C. at Whiteley Woods, 14th June, 1946. Lost. Swinton 145 for 9 declared, School 84.

In their first fixture against this team the School did not fare well. Although Swinton started badly, three wickets falling for three runs, they quickly recovered and scored fast against a mediocre attack in which Colebrook (3 for 21) bowled quite consistently. The School batsmen could not put up any effective resistance to the Swinton bowlers, only Lindley (17) showing anything like form.

v. Chesterfield Grammar School at Whiteley Woods, 22nd June 1946 Won. School 138 for 6 declared, Chesterfield 58.

Allan and Tyler opened the batting for the School, and runs soon came, 54 went on the board before Tyler was run out. The high-light of this partnership was the quick running between the wickets, it was a delight to see two batsmen who understood each other so perfectly. Wood came in and also batted well, his 39 included some delightful cover drives; he was ably supported by Horn who, although a trifle lucky, batted less recklessly than usual for his 29. Chesterfield made no sort of a show against a determined attack, in which Lindley shone, his 5 for 16 included the first hat-trick this season by a School bowler.

v.  Ackworth School, at Ackworth, 29th June, 1946. Won. School 151 for 9 declared, Ackworth 53.

The wicket was bone dry and full of runs; however it loosened up during the Ackworth innings after a period of heavy rain. Allan (31), Wood (27) and Colebrook (18) all batted aggressively. Colebrook much less reserved than usual, hit quite hard, a pleasant change. Allan declared, giving Ackworth two hours in which to make the runs. But they did not succeed. The School bowling was good, Lindley (4 for 19) and Merrills (4 for 15) were always dangerous, and Allan switched Colebrook about to good effect. Grant kept wicket very soundly and took two good catches in a game which showed up the consistency and the good all round qualities of the team better than any other game this season.

2ND XI.

The 2nd XI, under the Captaincy of Cooper, J. A. M., has had a fairly successful season, having won three and lost two games. The matches against Derby 1st XI, Wakefield, and Chesterfield, were won decisively, but against Barnsley, the batting collapsed, and against High Storrs the fielding and bowling were not up to their usual standard. The batting has been, on the whole, erratic. No batsman has batted consistently, Parkin and Heeley having had most success. The bowling has usually been strong enough to tie the opposing side down. In this department Pearson, Peterken, Roake, and Armytage have bowled well and consistently. With added confidence this team should provide good material for the 1st XI next year.

2ND XI RESULTS.

v.  Derby 1st XI. Won by 56 runs. School 2nd XI 94 for 9 (declared). Derby 38 (Peterken 4 for 4).

v.  Barnsley 2nd XI. Lost by 6 wickets. School 2nd XI 34 (Peterken 14), Barnsley 36 for 4.

v.  Wakefield 2nd XI. Won by 9 runs. School 55 (Heeley 19), Wakefield 46 (Hunter 6 for 14).

v.  Chesterfield. Won by 92 runs. School 110 for 8 (Cooper 33, Lowrie 22). Chesterfield 18 (Peterken 4 for 9, Roake 3 for 4, Armytage 2 for 3).

v.  High Storrs. Lost by 10 wickets. School 2nd XI 75 (Parkin 24, Heeley 22 not out). High Storrs 76 for 0.

UNDER 15 XI.

Four matches have been played this season, with the following results K.E.S. 80 for 4 wickets (declared); Derby 2nd XI 71. Won by 9 runs.

Chesterfield G.S. 66; K.E.S. 67 for 7 wickets. Won by 3 wickets.

K.E.S. 92; High Storrs 93 for 4 wickets. Lost by 6 wickets.

Junior Technical School 2nd XI 106; K.E.S. 21. Lost by 85 runs.

A good 50 was scored by Parkin in the match against Derby, and he, with some assistance from Prideaux, Bingham, and Brown, was the chief run getter. In general the batting of the side was most unenterprising: the "tail" was long and very weak. There was some good bowling by Dowling, Holmes, and Parkin.

195

194

UNDER 14 XI.

At the time of going to press (July 5th) three matches have been played, two of which have been won and one drawn. Two fixtures have been abandoned. The side has been very efficiently captained by Keighley. The bowling of Dickens and Keighley, and Green’s sound batting, have been features of the games.

Results

May 11th a. Derby G. S. (Home): won. Derby 29 (Keighley 4 for 8, Dickens 4 for 18). K.E.S. 30 for 3.

May 25th a. Repton (Away): drawn. Repton 64 for 8 (dec.) (Dickens 4 for 13). K.E.S. 40 for 4 (Keighley 15 not out, Green 12 not out).

June 22nd a. Chesterfield G.S. (Away): won. K.E.S. 63 (Green 21). Chesterfield 14 (Dickens 8 for 4).

The following have played in the three matches:—Keighley, Heeley, D., Hulley, K., Dickens, Green, D., Barber, Fletcher, Fells, Everitt, Bailey, Baker, R. F. W., Leeson, Fenton.

A. G. A. M.

1st XI AVERAGES.

BATTING.

Name

Innings

Times Not Out

Runs

Most in an Innings

Average

Allan

15

2

381

63 no.

29.33

Tyler

11

2

198

70 no.

22.0

Wood

13

2

207

39 no.

18.82

Lindley...

12

1

177

36

16.09

Merrills...

8

4

59

14 no.

14.75

Grant

8

5

40

14 no.

13.33

Colebrook

13

1

154

27

12.83

Wreghitt

13

4

106

40 no.

11.55

Horn

13

0

109

29

8.38

BOWLING.

Name

Overs

Maidens

Runs

Wickets

Average

Colebrook

1724

68

238

54

4.41

Lindley...

801

29

174

20

8.7

Dickens...

66

22

135

14

9.64

Merrills...

182

71

375

38

9.86

Hunter...

114

1

47

4

11.75

CATCHES: Grant 12, Horn 7, Lindley 5, Wreghitt 5, Allan 3, Colebrook 3, Tyler 3, Merrills 2, Lawrie 2, Heeley 1, Hunter 1.

Cricket Colours re-awarded to Merrills, Lindley, Colebrook, Wreghitt; awarded to Wood, Horn, Grant, Tyler.

Played 15 matches; won 8, drawn 3, lost 4.

HOUSE NOTES

ARUNDEL.

At the end of last term the Athletic Sports were held. After much ado we were placed third, only five points behind the winners. Wreghitt ran well to tie for the honour of Champion Athlete. We were not as successful as usual in the Relays, but we won the Junior Tug easily. This emphasises the solid foundation which the lower-school members of the House are providing. Activities this term have been concentrated on cricket and swimming. The 1st XI and 3rd XI have one game to play, and are fifth and second equal respectively. The 2nd, after winning every game but one, have won the cup. We reached the final of the Knock-Out Competition for the second year in succession, but were beaten by the strong Chatsworth XI. The Swimming Sports proved a disappointment this year. We were placed sixth, Edwards, P. G. Dickens, Fells, and Bradshaw being the only members to obtain points on the final day. Our depleted team was unable to retain its grasp on the Water Polo Cup, in spite of the brilliant and consistent play of Edwards. We finished fourth in the League. It has become increasingly evident this year that the main strength of the House lies in the Upper and Lower School; there is a lack of willingness to try among the Fifth and Transitus. This must be remedied next year as nearly all the Sixth-formers of the House are leaving this term. The House heard with deep regret of the death of J. P. Searle. His willingness to pull his weight in all spheres of House activity is still clearly remembered and should serve as an example to us all in years to come.

I should like to express my thanks to Allan for his work and example, as well as to Edwards and Wreghitt. To all who are leaving we wish the best of luck in the future.—C.J.M.

CHATSWORTH.

The League Cricket this year has not been very good, although the 2nd XI have done reasonably well. The 1st XI are at present sixth, the 2nd XI third, and the 3rd XI fourth. However, the Knock-Out team put up a much better performance in retaining the cup by again beating Arundel in the Final. The whole team must be congratulated on very fine fielding and mention must be made of Colebrook whose fine bowling and batting laid the foundations of victory. The House, as usual, did well in the Swimming Sports. Although we started the Sports near the bottom of the list, we finished runners-up to Welbeck. The senior Relay team did well to retain the Shield and we all offer our congratulations to Swindale on his fine captaincy of Swimming both in the House and in the School, and also on being Champion Swimmer. At Water Polo our ream put up a good performance and was placed third. At the end of this term, Mr. Smith will be leaving us. His untiring zeal and readiness to help with all sides of the House’s activities have made him both liked and respected throughout the House, and we shall be very sorry to see him go. All our good wishes go with him. It only remains to say goodbye and good luck to all members of the House who are leaving this term, and especially to Colebrook, a fine sportsman who has served the House well in all sporting activities.

CLUMBER.

Again we managed to collect the majority of the Athletic trophies, thanks mainly to Parkin and Pearson. Congratulations especially to Parkin on being Champion Athlete. The Relay team ran very well in a strong field and gained first place. The Tug-of-War team—Six of the best specimens of beef and brawn—did almost even time dragging their opponents behind them: a fine all-round effort. The Cricket teams have played well. The 1st XI finished second in the League—again showing Clumber’s insistent claim on second place. Pearson has been a good captain and Brown the most promising player. The Knock-Out team performed a remarkable feat of which the less said the better. Only beaten by one run, their effort was commendable. The 3rd XI was changed almost every week owing to the glut of keen players and to give each one a chance. Having lost all but three of our Water-Polo team, some good matches were played, especially a fighting draw against Wentworth. Hall is the most improved player. Unfortunately, with the exception of Hall and Pearson we retained our consistent swimming form! Congratulations to Pearson on his fine places in the three-length, one-length, and diving. Amongst others, we have to say goodbye to Grant who leaves us to join a nobler cause. He has been an invaluable member of both School and House teams at Cricket and Football. At the end of this term the writer will be leaving. He can only say that he has enjoyed being with you, and with a little more luck we would have carried everything before us. But then, without an odds - against struggle, that would not be Clumber as he knows it. Carry on the good work.

HADDON.

The cricket teams this term have not done very well, and we have heard several lamentable results announced in assembly. Although apathy is evident among our Middle-School members, the keenness of the younger cricketers is pronounced, and we can expect more successful seasons in the future. Wood has played well for the School 1st XI, and Roake and Mousley for the 2nd XI. The most gratifying event this term was the winning of the Water Polo Cup by the House. We were the only team not to have lost a match; our record of four wins and three draws shows the consistent efforts of the team. The success has been entirely due to the excellent team spirit prevailing; every member has played well. The good defence is to be praised for restricting goals against us to six, four of them being long shots, while the forwards have pressed home with some amazingly accurate shots. In the Swimming Sports, we heartily congratulate R. Baker and N. Baker on being first and second respectively in both the Under 14 free-style and the back-stroke. Also, thanks to them, the House was placed second in the junior Relay. We are sorry to say goodbye to Mr. Axon, whom we must all thank for his work as House Tutor, and we wish him every success in his new work. Also leaving are Hemingway, Howell, Siddell, and Wood, all of whom by their continued efforts have advanced the position of the House considerably during the last year. We wish them the best of luck and thank them for all they have done.

LYNWOOD.

At the end of last term we were successful in winning the Athletic Sports Cup. The result was not really decided until the senior Relay team were placed second in their event. The cup was won by an all-round performance, for both young and old members contributed. If anyone contributed more, those to mention are Fletcher, Corner, and Tilsley. Lewis also must be mentioned, for he, after running in the Mile and the first lap of the Relay, which was void, ran very pluckily as third string. During the cricket season the 1st XI and 2nd XI have played very well. The former have won the cup and the latter have a good chance of doing so. Players of note in the 1st XI are the bowlers, Peterken and Shaw, the stumper, Tilsley, and Heeley; and in the 2nd XI, Peterken, Wheen, and Jepson. The Knock-Out team reached the semi-final but were beaten by Chatsworth, the eventual winner of the trophy. Swimming this term is once more a sore point. Although we lack good swimmers, the Water Polo could be improved, if more people would learn to throw a ball, which, incidentally, is not as easy as it looks. In the sports only one person, Hiller, gained places in the finals. Both Relay teams reached the finals, but were not placed. This term we say goodbye to Mr. Bradley and wish him and Mrs. Bradley every happiness for the future, and thank him for all he has done for the House. Finally, we wish Corner and Tilsley, and all others who may be leaving, every success in their future careers.

SHERWOOD.

Congratulations to M. B. Thorneloe on being elected Cricket Captain. This term the 1st and 2nd XIs have had few victories—although the former has on one or two occasions been surprisingly successful. The 1st XI, however, consists of young members of the School, and should, like the corresponding football team, have considerably more success in the next year or two. The 3rd XI, under the captaincy of Cox, has played well, and ill fortune, more than any lack of skill or enthusiasm, has prevented it from occupying a high position on the League table. In the Athletic Sports at the end of last term, the House was placed second, with a total of 309 points, only three less than the winner, Lynwood. G. R. Milner is to be congratulated on breaking his own High Jump record and reaching a height of 5 feet 8 inches. Stanfield won the High Jump in the junior section, and came second in the Long Jump. The junior section won the Relay race, also helped by Stanfield’s good lead in the first lap, and were beaten only in the final of the Tug-of-War. The senior section was less successful, but mention must be made of a magnificent effort by Kenny to retrieve our failing fortunes in the Relay race. One record was broken in the recent Swimming Sports, and that, by G. B. Marsh who knocked 1/5th sec. off the 14-16 one-length breast-stroke record. The House, which was placed fourth in the championship, offers him its heartiest congratulations. At the end of this term we say goodbye to M. G. Armytage, the Head of the House, and G. R. Milner, the House Athletics Captain, and we wish them, and all others who are leaving, the best of luck in their future occupations.

196 197

WELBECK.

The House cricket teams have met with varied success this year. The 3rd XI have done very well in winning the cup, while the 1st and 2nd XIs have not been so successful. However, we have never had any difficulty in fielding three teams, and have often had a fourth in the pick-ups, which speaks well for the spirit of the House. The Water Polo team has, unfortunately, not repeated its success of last year. The Swimming Sports proved a very fitting climax to the year’s activities for Welbeck. This is the first time that we have won the House Trophy, although we have often been very near it. However, there was no doubt about the issue, and the following are to be congratulated on their contributions to victory the Tebbet brothers for their fine performances in winning the open and under 14 Neat Dive, Laybourn and Baker on being 2nd and 3rd respectively in the two-length back-stroke, and the under 14 Relay team who won their event in fine style. The latter is a result that is encouraging for the future. In spite of the efforts of the above it is chiefly due to the large number of boys in the House who swam their half-mile, quarter-mile, or length, that we gained the points to give us the lead. Thus we can say that the Trophy has been won in the best way, that is, not by the brilliance of a few boys but by the efforts of the House as a whole. The House congratulates Barthorpe on winning the Parents’ Spoken English Prize, and on his fine performance at Speech Day.

WENTWORTH.

This term has been one of "might-have-beens" for Wentworth. Firstly, the House Knock-Out team, although they only got a poor score in the semi-final against Arundel, seemed to be in a favourable position when they had taken three wickets for one run. However, despite some very good fielding, particularly by Dawson, Arundel recovered to pass our score. The League 1st XI seemed to have a good chance of winning the cup, but they are now three points behind the leaders, so they must be considered out of the running. One bright feature of the team has been the very promising batting of Bingham. The 2nd XI still has a chance of winning its cup, at the time of writing; we hope they will have done so by the time these notes are read. The House Water Polo team, in a very exciting last game with Haddon, could only draw and so were runners-up by one point. At the Swimming Sports the senior Relay team was, unfortunately, disqualified in the heat, when they had beaten Chatsworth, the eventual winners. Ditchfield did not disappoint us, however, and with 42 points he was second to Swindale, the Champion Swimmer. Sussams did very well to get into three finals; next year we hope he will win them all. Merrills won the open breast-stroke. Of those who are leaving, Clixby is going to Sheffield University with a scholarship in Modern Languages, and Horridge to Cambridge, with a scholarship in Natural Science. Taylor, Swallow, and Merrills, with little prospect of being allowed by the Minister of Labour to enter a University next term, look forward to nothing better than wearing a khaki suit during the next two years. Finally, to all those who are leaving we wish the best of luck in whatever they may undertake, and to those who are staying we say "Work hard and play hard, and fill the Wentworth cupboard with cups."

OLD EDWARDIANS

JOHN P. SEARLE (K.E.S. 1937-45)

We deeply regret to announce the death of John Searle, who left in the Transitus in February, 1945, a member of Arundel. He was articled for a few months to Mr. A. G. Bedingfield, partner in the firm of Macredie and Evans, Chartered Accountants, but in April contracted an illness of unknown origin. He was removed for observation and treatment to St. Mary’s Hospital, London, and afterwards to the Royal National Hospital, Isle of Wight, where he died peacefully on June 14th, 1946.

He had been a keen member of his House, and took an interest in many practical hobbies. His father writes "He thought a great deal of his school and of those who taught him, and it is a comfort to us to feel that his days there—half his life—were happy, and that he is remembered." we extend our deepest sympathy to his family.

ROBERT H. JAMES (K.E.S. 1925-34)

Robert James died on May 26, at 32, Carfield Avenue, Sheffield, aged 29. After a brilliant career at school he was elected to a History Scholarship at Balliol College, Oxford, but persistent ill-health prevented the completion of his university course. For a time he was on the staff of the Sheffield Telegraph, but later was obliged to seek open-air occupation. He leaves a widow, to whom, with his family, we offer our sincere sympathy.

News of the following War Decorations has recently come to our notice

Major J. H. P. UPTON, M.B.E., for distinguished services while serving with the Reconnaissance Regiment in N.W. Europe.

Captain P. L BURKINSHAW, Parachute Regiment, 6th Airborne Division, Mentioned in Despatches for a special and successful reconnaissance into the German lines before the River Maas.

Brigadier E T. WILLIAMS has been appointed Director of the Enforcement Division, Security Council Department, United Nations.

J. E. MIDDLETON is completing his medical studies at St. Thomas’s Hospital (at Hydestyle, Godalming). He plays centre-half for the Hospital. "Middleton can hold any centre-forward and his heading and tackling are excellent," says the St. Thomas’s Hospital Gazette.

D. MERVYN JONES has been awarded the Alan Gray Memorial Prize at Cambridge for an essay on "The significance of Sibelius in the history of music.

L. R. KAY has been appointed Lecturer in English at Copenhagen University.

198

Service details

F. D. N. CAMPAILLA, R.A.F., Hospital Clerical staff, Cairo.

P. MOLD, Petty Officer, R.N.V.R.

G. CURTIS (FRANKFURT), Cpl. Parachute Regiment, Control Commission in Germany.

MARRIAGE.

On May 28, quietly, in London, Brigadier E. T. WILLIAMS. C.B., C.B.E., D.S.O.. King’s Own Dragoon Guards, to GILLIAN GAMBlER-PARRY, of 38 Abingdon Court, W.8.

BIRTH.

On May 9, at Oxford, to the wife of Major J. H. WILLIAMS, a son (Roger).

NOTICES

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OLD EDWARDIANS’ ASSOCIATION—Hon. Secretary, R. G. BEARD, 45, Bank Street, Sheffield 1.

CROSSWORD

By I.D.B.C.

ACROSS.

1. "Lost In spoil" (Anag).

2. "I met my Delia" (Anag).

13. This place is often a rendez-vous.

14. (rev) To sink in mud.

15. — majesty; treason.

16. Dust from stum.

17. Expansion.

24. About to be shortened.

25. Reconcile.

26. Nero forms an Irish river.

27. Common to handkerchief and a country.

28. These aeroplanes remind us of a Shakespeare play.

29. "Sent sale" (Anag).

30. Knock the tail off these.

DOWN.

1. This scarlet flower rescued Frenchmen from gaol.

2. A sign from a hero mentioned by the CO.

3. Suspect by a scent (3 words).

4. Argument for two people (3 words).

5. Rope from an African river.

6. Covers water pipes.

7. Article In sit emplumed.

8. It sounds as though the umpires are in debt for a short over.

9. A doctor uses these to diagnose.

11. "Dire sob" (Anag).

12. Knock 7 and 8 out of light.

18. A gas from none.

19. This little man is nearly a fairy.

20. (rev) "Peers " (Anag).

21. Often go with the Pensions.

22. A song tells of two black ones.

23. These hills rejoice, says the hymn.