A. WV. BARTON, M.A., PH.D.,

HEADMASTER.

 

PHOTOGRAPHS by B Mayo : The Working Party in Borrowdale.
see page 100

 

King Edward VII School Magazine.

VOL. X]          JULY 1939.     [No. 3.

Editors
H. F. GUITE, J. H. P. UPTON.

Hon. Sec.
Mr. E. F. WATLING.

CONTENTS.

Editorial

87

Fives

117

Obituary

88

Cricket, 1939

117

School Notes

89

Junior School

134

School Chapel Service

91

Old Edwardians

136

Speech Day

92

Oxford Letter

139

The Inter-School Debate

97

Old Edwardians Football Club

141

Digging in Cumberland

100

   

Provence, 1939

104

The Library

142

The Prize Poem

107

Orchestra Notes

142

The Sohnsucht

107

The Gramophone Club

144

Catullus VII

109

House Notes

145

Spain

109

'Perm-end Puzzles

147

Sentiments on Leaving

110

Crossword

148

Athletic Sports

110

Notices

149

Swimming

113

   

Editorial.

D R. BARTON had already played himself in by the time Speech Day arrived, and the fine performance he gave on that occasion confirmed our opinion that he is well set for a great innings. His dedication of his powers to the service of the School was moving in its sincerity, and we hope to see him achieve all the ideals on which he has set his heart.

*          *          *          *

Our first Term under his Headmastership has seen at least one important innovation. The serving of School Dinner is now in the hands of table stewards, boys of senior rank chosen for their efficiency and sense of responsibility. Other reforms have been effected, too, whilst yet others are being considered for the future. The new system is working well, and will run more smoothly as the table stewards become accustomed to their duties. All non-diners are recommended to give the School Dinner a trial. We are sure that they will get better value than they can get anywhere else, and will consequently hasten to become regular patrons before it becomes necessary to limit the number of diners.

*          *          *          *

We are disturbed by the lack of contributions to THE MAGAZINE from all but the VI Form. Although it is not proposed to lower the high standard which THE MAGAZINE demands of its contributors, we feel sure that there is in all parts of the School sufficient talent to produce efforts worthy of inclusion. Next Term we shall be pleased to consider accounts of what boys have been doing in their holidays, and we trust that no one will be afraid to submit his manuscript through shyness or fear of ridicule. All would-be contributors are treated with every courtesy and consideration.

*          *

By the time this appears the agony of examinations will be almost over, and we shall be already anticipating the joys of the long vacation. To those who are leaving we give our best wishes, and recommend them to keep in touch with the School by joining the Old Edwardians' Association. We urge those who return to play their part in the life of the School with vigour and enthusiasm, remembering that a school is always what its scholars make it.

Obituary.

RONALD GURNER.

T HE Staff and Old Boys heard with very great regret of the sudden death, on June 7th, of Mr. Ronald Gurner, Headmaster of this School from September, 1926, to December, 1927, and subsequently Master of Whitgift School. Mr. Gurner's short term as Headmaster here gave an impetus to many sides of the School's life : the House system was strengthened by the appointment of junior masters as House Tutors ; Scouting was inaugurated ; the Orchestra was formed, and new facilities provided for dramatic productions ; some extension of the catering arrange­ments gave new opportunities for social activities out of School ; the Magazine was entrusted to an editorial committee of prefects ; and among isolated occasions typical of Mr. Gurner's imagination and enterprise we remember an all-night mass excursion to Richmond to witness an eclipse of the sun at dawn. It would be wrong, however, to suggest that his policy for the School was all in the direction of fun and games. His rule was firm and vigorous and he imparted to his prefects and Sixth Form a sense of responsibility and industry. He made many friends among pupils, parents, and Staff, in whose name we offer our sincere sympathy to his widow and son.

School Notes.

WE welcome to the Staff Mr. A. Macnaughton, of Sydney Sussex College, Cambridge, who has taken over tem­porarily a part of Mr. Hunter's work.

Mr. Hunter, to whom we bade our official farewells last Term, has stayed on to pilot his VI Form set safely through the stormy seas of Higher Certificate, but is to retire finally at the end of this Term. References to his fine record of service and his parting generosity to the Library are found elsewhere. We take this opportunity of once more wishing him a long and happy retirement.

*          *          *          *

We also hid farewell to Mr. Thomas, who leaves us to marry and to take up an appointment at Haberdashers Aske's School, Hatcham. He will be much missed in the Orchestra, among the Scouts, and on the cricket field, as well as in Room 66.

*

Mr. S. W. Whitehouse, who left us in 1931 to become Headmaster of Wigan Grammar School, has been appointed Headmaster of Alsop High School for Boys, under the Liverpool Education Committee.

*          *          *

Hearty congratulations to B. Mayo on winning the Akroyd Scholarship of £50 a year. This award is the blue riband of York­shire scholarship, and has now been won for four years in succession by a boy of the School.

*          *          *          *

We also offer hearty congratulations to H. F. Guite on his Open Exhibition of £40 a year for Classics at St. Catherine's College, Cambridge ; to J. E. D. Corner on his Henry Habershon Mining Scholarship of £100 a year at Sheffield University and on his Technical Scholarship at Sheffield University (declined) ; and to W. A. Hudson on his Robert Styring Undergraduate of £50 a year at Sheffield University.

*          *          *          *

This issue contains a list of boys who have gained various awards of the Royal Life Saving Society. It is pleasing to observe the upward trend of swimming in the School, and we hope next year to see a still longer list of awards.

*          *          *          *

Although the Cricket Season has not yet ended, L. W. Fletcher has already taken 62 wickets for the School 1st Xl, thus breaking the record of 59 set up by C. Trickett in 1925.

*          *          *          *

The music provided by Choir and Orchestra during this Term, and especially on Speech Day, has been of a high standard. We congratulate the Orchestra on their capital performances in London and in Leeds, and hope that the time is not far distant when the Choir will similarly distinguish itself.

The School Collection, taken this Term on behalf of the Lord Mayor of London's " Thetis " Fund, together with the contributions of Staff and parents, reached the very satisfactory total of £50.

*          *          *          *

More than once this Term the School has been invaded by photographers, and has provided them with pictures of lusty gymnasts and eager students at play and at work, in gymnasium and classroom. The Telegraph and Independent of July 4th favoured us with a page of representative ` views.'

*          *          *          *

The Junior School held their customary " Open Day " on July 8th, and gave their usual delightfully versatile display. Cricket, swimming and gymnastic were on view in the usual places, while at Clarke House the Nature and Art Rooms contained exhibi­tions full of interest. The only change in the programme occasioned by an unusually wet morning was that the play, " The Rose and the Ring," had to be transferred from Clarke House garden to a hastily-equipped stage in the Assembly Hall. But this in-no way daunted the performers-in fact it stimulated their already abun­dant vigour and resourcefulness, and a most enjoyable performance brought the day to an end.

School Chapel Service.

SCHOOL Chapel Service was held on Sunday, May 7th, and the preacher was Bishop Norman Tubbs, Dean of Chester Cathedral. Although attendance was not obligatory, a very large number of boys were present.

Bishop Tubbs took as his text a phrase from the Prayer Book, whose service is perfect freedom." Everybody, he said, wanted to be free to enjoy life. Many people tried to achieve this by a succession of new and ever-varying experiences, travelling, living a gay life, and so on. All they achieved, however, was to he bored and to be driven like straw before the wind from one thrill to another without finding any lasting happiness. What they did not realise was that the enjoyment of a lower experience automatically excluded the enjoyment of a higher experience. A youth who chose the experience of fast and loose living could not hope to experience a healthy and upright manhood ; a boy who chose the experience of smoking whilst still at school was thereby forfeiting the experience of being a good athlete.

If, continued Bishop Tubbs, we were going to devote our lives to the service of God and of our fellow men, we should choose only those experiences which are high and noble, and which contribute to the making of a strong and steadfast character. Only thus could all our faculties and talents be fully developed ; only thus could we attain the perfect freedom that is to be found in service.

Bishop Tubbs was afterwards introduced to the prefects in their room and gave them an extremely interesting account of his experiences abroad.

H. F. G.

Speech Day.

JUNE 17th, 1939.

PROGRAMME.
Reveille.
THE SCHOOL SONG.

THE CHAIRMAN OF THE GOVERNORS,
DANIEL EvANS, Esq., J.P.

Song    "England "         Parry

SCHOOL AND ORCHESTRA.

THE HEADMASTER'S REPORT.

LATIN ADDRESS OF WELCOME, SPOKEN BY P. J. WHEATLEY, HEAD PREFECT.

Address and Distribution of Prizes by
THE RIGHT HON. THE VISCOUNT SANKEY, G.B.E.

Song ' " Brother James' Air       Bain
THE SCHOOL CHOIR (with Orchestral Accompaniment) and SCHOOL.

Vote of Thanks to Viscount Sankey, proposed by The LORD MAYOR OF
SHEFFIELD (Alderman W. J. HUNTER, J.P.), and seconded by Alderman
E. G. ROWLINSON, J.P. (Deputy Lord Mayor of Sheffield).

Madrigal:          The Morris Dance"       Stanford.
THE SCHOOL CHOIR, conducted by Mr. J. H. ATKINS.

GOD SAVE THE KING

Accompaniment and introductory music (Haydn's Symphony No. 2,
" London," Last Movement) by the School Orchestra, conducted by
Mr. P. L. Baylis.

TRADITIONAL celebrations seldom become dull. Time lends an enchantment which is not easily dispelled. The Annual Speech Day is no exception. Year after year we follow the same routine with no indication that interest is beginning to flag. Indeed, so far from flagging, interest has increased to such an extent since last year that great difficulty was experienced in seating the thousand visitors.

After the Orchestra had played the last movement of Haydn's Symphony No. 2 in a manner which showed their creditable repu­tation in London to be not unwarranted, the distinguished guests and the governing body took their seats on the platform. Reveille and the School Song were sting lustily, fortunately without mishap among the brass, and the Chairman of the Governors, Mr. DANIEL EVANS, J.P., rose to open the meeting.

Mr. Evans welcomed Lord Sankey and said that Sheffield was extremely fortunate to have so distinguished a speaker. In the past year the School had lost Mr. Graham, who had served it so well for many years. It was to be hoped he would find every happiness and success at Bradford. Dr. J. H. Hichens, Headmaster of the School for the first twenty-one years of its existence, had died at Paignton, in Devon, last September. Mr. Evans paid tribute to Dr. Hichens and the work he did towards building up the School.

Those who had gained scholastic honours in the past year were to be congratulated and it was to be hoped that the success would be continued.

Welcoming the Headmaster, Mr. Evans said that he came to the School with a record of the highest scholastic attainment. His success was due to hard work and determination. The Committee was to be congratulated on their choice, and he felt sure that the School would prosper under Dr. Barton's headmastership.

The song " England ", by Parry, was sung, and the Headmaster rose to make his report.

The HEADMASTER said that he was grateful for the hearty welcome and kind words which had been bestowed upon him. He was proud to be Headmaster of a fine school which had already estab­lished a tradition for distinguished scholarship. He welcomed Lord Sankey, saying that it was indeed a privilege that a person of his distinction and eminence should have found time to come to Sheffield to give away the prizes. The School was also honoured, he said, by the presence of the Lord Mayor.

Reviewing the examination results of the past year, he said that although sixty-eight out of a hundred and three boys were successful in the School Certificate, he hoped a still greater number would be successful next year. Reasonable success in the School Certificate Examination was a sound indication that the average boy was being trained in habits of industry, and was reaching a fairly com­petent level of general education. The successes in the Higher Certificate Examination were not so good as usual, but that was accounted for by the fact that Mr. Graham did not enter for the Examination boys who had obtained both University Scholarships and all the other assistance they needed-a policy with which he was in agreement.

He had great pleasure in congratulating B. Mayo on being awarded a Demyship of ~ 100 a year at Magdalen College, Oxford, and on winning the Akroyd Scholarship, which was the blue riband of Yorkshire scholarship, being open to all Yorkshire schools. This was the fourth year in succession that the School had won the Scholarship, the awards being gained in Classics, Mathematics and History, a tribute to the high standard of academic attainment which had been reached in the School under the headmastership of Mr. Graham. Mayo was also to be congratulated on his State and Town Trust Scholarships.

H. F. Guite was to be congratulated on winning an Exhibition in Classics at St. Catherine's College, Cambridge, a success particularly meritorious because it was obtained by sheer hard work and deter­mination. Finally, G. D. Bolsover, last year's Head Prefect, was to be congratulated on an Exhibition in Natural Sciences at New College, Oxford, and D. N. D. Allen, Head Prefect 1936-37, on being awarded the junior Mathematical Scholarship-a credit to Mr. Nicholas' tireless energy and inspiring teaching.

He was sorry to hear of the death of Dr. Hichens, who, in the twenty-one years of his headmastership, made the School a force to be reckoned with among the Day Schools of the country. A further loss was incurred by the tragic death of Mr. Ronald Gurner, who made many friends and did much for the School in his short time as Headmaster.

The retirement of Mr. Hunter brought to an end a long and honourable term of service which many generations of Old Boys would remember with gratitude and affection.

Giving his first impressions of the School, the Headmaster said that he found the boys were hard working and had plenty of determination. They were delightfully spontaneous and free from convention. He would, however, like to see more assurance and personality. He had a feeling that a considerable number of boys ought to take more exercise. He did not wish sport to displace homework, but he believed that no normal boy could be healthy unless he took changed exercise three times a week. Cricket, under the leadership of Wheatley, though not of as high a standard as at Repton, was enthusiastic and showing improvement.

With regard to his policy in the future, the Headmaster said that he could not be expected after only seven weeks at the School to have any definite plans. He had no intention, however, of trying to convert the School into a pale imitation of Repton or any other great boarding school. It was clear to him that Sir Michael Sadler's view, expressed in 1903, was still the right one : the School should be a great Day School. He hoped it would become second to none in the country-a school to which scholars would regard it as a privilege to be elected and one to which the best families in Sheffield would be proud to send their sons-a centre of true learning and culture.

The Headmaster concluded : " Such qualities as I have I will give freely to the School, and I know that whatever difficulties may lie ahead, whatever burdens may be laid upon me, I shall not fail if I remember that those qualities are not of my own making, but have been given to me by that Unseen Power which is the source of all true strength, to be dedicated to the service of others. I dedicate them to this School and to your sons."

The Head Prefect, P. J. Wheatley, then delivered the Latin Address of Welcome to Lord Sankey on behalf of the School :­

vent ad vos, hospites, hodierno die vir amplissimus, qui invicesn ludi magister, palronus, praetor iudicii, denique ad summum honorem pervenit. itaque ferula deposita farces lam pridem sumpsit, nee lam in cathedra sed in lana sedet. neque hunc primum Cancellarium in hoc pulpito excipimus ; proximo enim anno cum daretur fabula Gilbertiana priorem in scaena se iactantem speetavimus. qui cum disertissimus esset, hunc alteritm pari eloquentia praeditum esse pro certo habemus. nonne praeterea huic eaedem sunt virtutis quas ille tam suaviter cecinit, his versibus exorsus:
" integritatis culmen atque virtutis
ius est, probrosi nil i-nest vet iniusti,
et ipse, pa lees, iuris en ego culmen.'

nec solum inns culmen hic quoque est ; sed etiam id a rege illo antiquo ad suae quisque arboris cacumen- promovebatur, ita hic tot honoribus ornatus est ut reipublicae Titipuensium decus Pooh Bah nobis repraesentari videatur. nunc igitur oro te, Johannes Sankey, ut orationem iam diu desideratum habeas.

Mr Evans then called upon the Rt. Hon. the VISCOUNT SANKEY, G.B.E., to give the Address and distribute the prizes. Lord Sankey thanked Wheatley for his welcome and presented the prizes.

Addressing the School, Lord Sankey said that in days of change and transition when old institutions were being canvassed and criticised, education was most important if we were to solve the problems in front of us. " We shall be failing in our duty to the next generation, if we neglect to equip our sons and daughters for the new world which is opening up." He congratulated the Governors on the high standard of culture in the School. " Such a school as this," he said, " may well carry the banners of another dawn under the leadership and advice of your new Headmaster."

Lord Sankey said that three things were necessary to the making of a school : parents, a headmaster and staff, and boys. Address­ing the parents, lie said that the best assets a parent could give to his children were good health and a good education. It was those qualities which produced the sound mind in the sound body. The longer a boy remained at school the better he was equipped for the battle of life.

In Dr. Barton, he thought the Governing Body had " spotted a winner." The School was also fortunate in its Staff a body of loyal men ; the many honours gained by boys were proof of the teaching of King Edward VII School. But the greatest credit was clue to a school not for the clever boy, but for the boy in the rank and file.

To the Staff he said that he knew how hard and anxious was the work of a master. They had, however, the consolation of knowing that the future of England was in their hands.

To the boys, Lord Sankey said : " Wherever you are and whatever you do, don't forget to do something for this great School, and ask yourself, because these times are difficult--and they will be more difficult in the near future ` How can I help ' ? England needs all the help she can get and I think the best way anyone can help the country is by doing his present job as well as lie possibly can. If you live up to the teaching you receive here, and the ideals and traditions of the School, your parents and your country are satisfied with you."

In a witty speech, the Lord Mayor, Alderman W. J. Hunter, J.P., proposed the vote of thanks to Lord Sankey, which was seconded by Alderman E. G. Rowlinson, J.P., the Deputy Lord Mayor.

A Madrigal by Stanford, " The Morris Dance," closed the evening, reminding us that Lord Sankey's description of the singing of the School Choir as " splendid," was not an overstatement.

J. H. P. U.

The principal prize-winners were : The Royal Grammar School Classical and Ancient History Prizes, The English Poem Prize and the Classical Composition Prize : B. Mayo ; The Wesley College English Prize : H. C. Rogers ; The Wesley College Science Prize J. E. D. Corner ; The W. P. Taylor Mathematical Prize A. Thornhill ; The English. Prize : J. Scott: The History Prize F. W. Colquhoun ; The French Prize : I). M. Jones ; The German Prize : F. L. Eastwood ; The Spanish Prize : G. H. Calvert ; Physics Prizes : A. Thornhill and J. G. Bolton ; The Chemistry Prize : P. J. Wheatley ; The Biology Prize : W. A. Hudson ; The English Essay Prize : J. Scott ; The Modern Language Essay Prize : D. M. Jones ; Classics Prize : H. F. Guite ; Ancient History Prize : D. M. Jones.

The Inter-School Debate.

ON May 11th, an Inter-School debate on Education was held at the High School. Miss Vollans was in the chair. The first question for discussion was whether schools provided an adequate preparation for after-life, and was introduced by Mr. Chapman, of Nether Edge. After-life, he said, consisted of work, social affairs, philanthropy and private interests, which included hobbies and sports. Preparation was made for all these at school. Education was, and should be, a general outline which was later specialised. Teachers should have some idea of psychology and be able to give advice about professions ; schools should teach their pupils to grasp ideas, and should stimulate their social instincts, for everyone was brought up in a community, which required the service of his talents. A good education, he considered, should not be scientifically thought out, but should be a natural development.

Mr. Hampton, of the City Secondary School, continued the subject. He was, he said, discontented with the education he had received, and he thought that was the general view. At the present time, he considered education was a sham, for the poverty of the average child was incompatible with his cultural development, so that it was essential to provide good living condi­tions for all. Also, parents, owing to their own bad education, had no real knowledge of it, but yet had full control of their children's upbringing ; more money and less ignorance was needed. He considered text-books to be a dangerous simplification of knowledge, for they taught us what was good for us to know, and were often propaganda. We should be taught more scientific knowledge and psychology and social relations. He also objected to the teaching of religion in schools, especially from the Old Testament, and advoca­ted their complete secularization. Modern Education ignored the emotional life of the child, and it was stupid to leave it to the ignorant parent. He regretted the lack of a philosophy and an ideal in teaching ; tradition and the dead hand of the past had far too much influence.

Miss Blower, of the High School, retorted with a spirited speech in defence of parents.

Mr. Hampton was then asked if he considered that there should be no education for those of poor social condition ; in answer he elaborated his previous arguments. Toleration, he said, was cowardice.

Mr Baker of Nether Edge, said he was dissatisfied with the staffs pro­vided ; five percent he could respect ; forty-five percent were not objection­able ; twenty per cent ought not to be there. Of the rest he made no mention. He complained that most adults suffered from a certain bitterness due to the lack of understanding of children among their own teachers.

Mr. Maxfield, of Firth Park, said he had never found his teachers un­sympathetic ; it was impossible for them to give individual teaching, and they could only teach, not educate. As for religious teaching in elementary schools, he considered that the elements and beliefs had to be taught before the scientific knowledge ; everyone could form his own opinion later. Mr. Hampton said that everyone should form his opinion without being taught any beliefs. He did not however suggest atheism.

Mr. Draycott, of Firth Park, pointed out that the previous speaker had implied that controversial theories should not be mentioned ; he therefore asked if he would pass over political theory in his perfect state ; the moral tales of the Old Testament were, he thought, a good way of teaching the basic principles of conduct.

Mr. Fleming, of Firth Park, said the same ideas could be taught by tales not of the Christian religion. He held that the tales were taught as true, and were often believed later in spite of logic. Religion should not be taught to children below the age of twelve, but then a general outline of all religions should be given.

The second subject for discussion was the Prefectorial System, on which the first speaker was Mr. Guite, of King Edward VII School. The prefectorial system, he said, depended on the larger question of school discipline, which he would assume to be real and necessary. It was only right that the older should have some authority over the less mature, and should share in the running of the school. If there was no such authority, relations between boy and master might be worse, because of the lack of the prefect as an intermediary. The prefects provided the best way of finding the general opinion of the school, and, in his view, not enough use was made of the prefects in this way. He had found that the prefect system did work ; it provided valuable training and experience for later life, and marked the stage when we ceased to become entirely dependent on the community, and had an opportunity for service, an opportunity to put back some of what we had taken out ; it could not fail as long as this motive remained.

Miss Riley, of Abbeydale, was the second speaker ; she said she was not attacking the system but its application ; yet she said it had too much totalitarian spirit when it was necessary to instil democratic ideas. Also, there was a risk of the prefect either becoming conceited, or obtaining an inferiority complex. She was afraid that boys might feel " repressed " by prefects.

Miss Elston, of the Central School, said that Mr. Guite had laid stress on the efficiency of the prefects rather than on their authority. The prefect, she feared, was either too strict, or else, in despair, made no attempt to use his authority.

Mr. Upton, of King Edward's, pointed out the impracticability of the election of prefects ; for, if this was followed to its logical conclusion, the lower school should elect the staff and the headmaster.

The last subject for discussion was co-education. Introducing it, Mr. Fletcher, of the City Secondary School, said that although there was co-education in the early years of school life, and in country schools, elsewhere there was segregation between the ages of twelve and sixteen, which might give boys an idea of the inferiority of girls, and this was likely to cause misunderstanding later on. Boys should be able to ameliorate girls ; the earlier each learned to respect the qualities of the other, the better.

Miss Crossland, of High Storrs, continuing, said that if education was to be merely training for a vocation, it would be better to have co-education that boys and girls might train together for the same jobs ; the equality of the sexes was, however, not really true in most professions. There were also differences in the curriculum to allow for ; boys, she believed, were interested in ideas, girls in persons. It would be difficult to obtain suitable staffs, as many otherwise excellent teachers would be failures with mixed classes. Though her opponent had stated an attractive case for co-education, she considered it impracticable until the educational system was arranged for the pupils, and not for the examiners.

The open discussion after these two orations produced conflicting evidence, numerous speakers arguing with some asperity against earlier remarks ; some who claimed to know from experience said that co-education did work, others affirmed that it did not ; and others were quite sure that they didn't want it anyway.

The chairman declared the meeting closed.

G.S.H.

Digging in Cumberland.

THIS unprecedented out-of-term relaxation had its origin as far back as the Autumn Term, when Mr. Graham drew the Sixth's attention to the Youth Movements and similar organisations abroad which were doing useful work on the land. His suggestion that something of the sort might interest some of the Sixth who had an excess of leisure and energy to dispose of, in return for a sojourn among the inhabitants of rural England, received an unexpectedly cordial acclamation, and Mr. Graham promised to see what he could do.

He left us soon afterwards, and the Sixth, after the first outburst of enthusiasm, seemed to forget the scheme. But just before the Easter holidays, we were pleased to learn that Mr. Graham had not forgotten the old School after all, but had found us a job of work in the Cumberland hills, which we were to tackle in co-operation with a party from Bradford. Needless to say, the prospect of earning a holiday in the Lakes overshadowed any misgivings about hard work, and quickly attracted the requisite number of volunteers.

Not to waste time over preliminaries, a very warm April afternoon found the main K.E.S. party, consisting of Upton, Ludlam, Fletcher L. W., Hipkins and myself, uniting forces with Wheatley and Hall, the advance-guard, and with Mr. Graham and the eight Bradfordians. The Mission Hut, which was to be our home, situated at the head of Borrowdale and beneath the slopes of Great Gable and Glaramara, had long since ceased to fulfil the function which its name indicates, and was used as a holiday camp by Barnard Castle School, which had kindly lent it us for the fortnight.

The same evening we inspected the site of operations. Close by, the juvenile Derwent, as yet only a mountain beck, had begun to eat away the bank on our side of the stream, and had already devoured a considerable amount of good pasture land. Our job was to restore it to its proper course and prevent further erosion, by digging a channel through the shingle bed deposited by the river on the opposite bank, and building a retaining wall with the shingle thus removed. Whether it was the deterrent size and solidity of the shingle bed that unnerved us, or the hard canvas beds-few of us slept much that night.

But the next morning we looked out on a scene familiar to all Lakeland tourists-heavy rain was blotting out the mountain landscape and rendering work impossible. So most of that day was spent in playing pontoon in the hut.

The next two days brought no change of weather, but in the fine intervals we did at last get to work. Under the surveillance of our highly popular foreman, Mr. Waters, and Mr. Graham himself, the combined forces of K.E.S. and Bradford Grammar School launched a determined attack on that formidable shingle-bed, dig­ging out a channel at the upper end and using the material to construct a breakwater calculated to divert the stream into its new course. Barrowful after barrowful was conveyed, precariously enough, along the gradually extending plankway, and the spit advanced steadily upstream in an oblique line towards the opposite bank. Already we were persuading ourselves that more water was going down the new channel than the old, when the next day brought a redoubled downpour of rain which, swelling all the mountain becks, transformed our placid Derwent into a raging torrent. The same afternoon we had the mortification of seeing our spectacular new breakwater pierced at several points and swept away down­stream ; and when the flood subsided somewhat next day only an ill-defined ruin remained.

However, the continued violence of the beck determined us not to profane the Sabbath by working that clay, and we all went climbing. The Bradfordian stalwarts, under the expert leadership of Mr. Graham, decided to attack the redoubtable Great Gable ; but most of the less experienced and less well-equipped Edwardians set out for a less pretentious mountain, known by the unassuming name of Dale Head. Here an unsuccessful attempt to rescue Ludlam's much-admired deerstalker hat, which blew over the edge, led us down precarious screes and canyons into the Newlands Valley, from which we emerged just in time for the evening service at the little church of Stonethwaite. Only three of us defied convention by appearing in climbing kit.

Next day we renewed work on the shingle bed. Undeterred by the disaster to the spit, we altered our tactics and concentrated on deepening and widening the new channel, leaving to the two con­tractors the work of constructing a more substantial breakwater of corrugated iron backed by heavy stones. The weather continuing fine and sunny, we worked our full six hours a day for the whole week. During this time the shingle bed was bodily removed to the other side of the stream, forming a huge retaining wall, extended at both ends by the new breakwater at the top, and a piece of dry-walling, built of big stones from the river, at the bottom. The levelling out of the bank by means of a tipping truck running on rails, as shown in an accompanying photograph, provided an outlet for much juvenile enthusiasm, and anyone who had seen the party spending a whole evening riding up and down the track would hardly have recognised them as Sixth-formers of Yorkshire's leading public schools.

At any rate the work was finished, much to our surprise, and also to the surprise of the local inhabitants. " Huh ! What do you boys know about beck-walling ? " was their sceptical comment when the news of our arrival flew round the neighbourhood. And they kept aloof from our doings, as if disdaining to take any interest in the futile scratchings of public schoolboys misguided enough to entertain notions of showing them what they ought to do. For spectators we had to be content with the children, who regularly visited us after school and could not be kept out even by removing the planks from the trestle bridge. We made friends with one bright little chap, Ernest, the only one who seemed able to establish contact with the strange invaders of his native village, and the only one to regret our departure.

If the disdain of the natives was somewhat discouraging, we were yet to undergo a further lowering of our self-esteem, in the shape of a visit by a party from a Devon public school who were " inspect­ing local conditions in Cumberland." However, we were already feeling like a distressed area, and were not at all surprised to find ourselves on their programme. We had our revenge by courteously inviting them to try their hand at a spot of work. They were soon flourishing pickaxes with great dexterity and to our great alarm, but boggled miserably at the heavy wheelbarrows.

Of our life there apart from the work there is little to tell, because there wasn't any except for eating and sleeping. Indeed, after six hours' digging all we cared about was eating and then doing just nothing. Appetites that would have astounded all our acquaintances at home were hardly to be satisfied by the cooks' frantic efforts. Every evening cries of " Bread ! " resounded in the ears of the exasperated cooks. ` --      them ! They're like - wolves ! " Sleep came readily ; and up betimes next morn­ing and off to work in blazing sunshine alternating with bitter gales, and sudden showers as the clouds hovering ominously on Great Gable's slopes swept down into the valley.

In spite of the continuous work and the exposure to the fickle elements, no casualties occurred except that of Wheatley, who was unfortunately taken ill with tonsilitis and obliged to return home. Nor can it be said of any of us that he did not do his fair share of work. Even the aristocratic Ludlam threw off his usual disinclina­tion for work and laboured with a will (although, on his own confession, the only blister lie ever got came from stirring porridge) ; Upton, a businesslike if somewhat odd figure in shorts and trilby, did work of his own when not abusing others for slacking ; while Hipkins, his first tremendous vigour and enthusiasm for work abated, was often to be seen between outbursts of energy taking an unobtrusive siesta.

Having thoroughly inured ourselves to manual labour (as we fondly thought), we were extremely sorry when the day of departure dawned. It was a memorable morning. We awoke in an unusually chilly atmosphere. " There's snow on the ground," was the announcement of the earliest riser. There was. Outside all the familiar hills were draped with a thin mantle of snow, golden in the rays of the early morning sun, which for us had not yet risen from behind Glaramara. And few bathed in the beck that morning.

But we had to turn our eyes from this enchanting scene to more prosaic things, namely the clearing up of the hut. This unwelcome proceeding must have amused the schoolchildren, already lined up along the wall outside, and gazing as inscrutably as ever. Soon we were saying good-bye to Mr. Graham and hoping that the refuse still peeping from every corner of the hut would escape his notice. We boarded the bus for Keswick. And the headlines of the paper that the driver showed us said, " Conscription " . . . But even this melancholy news was temporarily forgotten, as we approached Derwentwater, at the magnificent sight of Skiddaw clothed in glistening snow. Shortly afterwards, having embarked on the little local train, we were passing under the frowning snow flecked heights of Saddleback, the last of the Lakeland mountains, and a reminder that an enjoyable, if energetic, holiday was at an end. Our unexpected meeting with Mr. Clay at Hellifield similarly reminded us of the prospect of school on the morrow.

So ended a most delightful and useful holiday amid scenery of great beauty and rich with associations of great English poets. I should like to take this opportunity of heartily thanking Mr. Graham ; and I am sure that all those who took part, and others as well, are anxious that it shall be repeated in the future. As a regular out-of-school activity, this sort of thing should certainly prove popular both as a healthy and enjoyable occupation for leisure time and as a means for doing work of national, or at any rate social, importance.

B. M.

Provence, 1939.

UNDER the leadership of Mr. Atkins, the party left Sheffield on Wednesday, April 12th, and arrived at Dieppe at 2.0 a.m. the following morning. We had a perfectly calm voyage, during which most of us slept, in spite of the persistent attentions of an irate Frenchman.

At Dieppe we had our first introduction to French coffee, about the quality of which opinions differed. Our next meal was in Paris, where Booth made his first attempt at French conversation by asking for " Pain qui n'est pas frais."

From Paris we travelled to La Bastide, where we were met by two bearded apparitions which turned out to be Messrs. Bradley and Brearley, whereupon Stanley aptly remarked, " Dr. Livingstone, I presume ? " We had a very appetising and welcome dinner with Vila rouge, and, although various theories were put forward as to the contents of the meat pie, and Hawker complained of feeling slightly " woozy," everybody enjoyed it and retired to bed.

On Friday we left by train and 'bus for Ispagnac, where we made our first acquaintance with " Grenadine," a drink made from pomegranate juice, and French motor horns. From there we walked through pouring rain (which, incidentally, failed to silence Mortimer) to St. Enimie. On our arrival there, we found we were not expected until the next day. However, we were accommodated in the "Auberge de la Jeunesse," which failed to give a good impression of French hostels, as most of us slept in a hay-loft. It was very fortunate that the rain had stopped, for in the morning we found it was possible to see daylight through the roof. For many days afterwards we kept finding straw in our clothing and kit. We were disappointed in one other respect, for we never saw our fellow lodgers, so much advertised on the hostel notice board. "Attention aux rats," ran the legend :-" Peu nombreux, mais tres voraces ' --few in number, but very hungry ! We learned, too, that the little slates lying over holes and cracks in the wooden floors were " to prevent the rats from circulating." The ghost of a rat is said to have haunted the sleepers in the loft, but nobody claimed a concrete encounter.

On the next day we walked to La Malene, where we embarked in flat-bottomed boats down the river Tarn, through the beautiful Gorges do Tarn, where there are many good examples of natural rock sculpture. After leaving the boats, we went on to Millar, where we found an excellent hostel, which possessed, to the great joy of everyone, enough blankets for us to have two each.

On Sunday we left Millau for Nimes, the birthplace of the famous French statesman Guizot, and " La Rome francaise," so called because of its many Roman remains, one of which, " Les Arenes," we visited in the afternoon to see a bull-fight. Several members of the party, including Mr. Bradley, seemed to think that every bull is called Ferdinand. The bull-fight was not of the old-fashioned blood-thirsty variety, but the" razeteurs " wore white flannels and shirts and to score a victory had to remove ribbons from the bull's forehead.

While in Nimes we also visited the Maison Carree, which was, in Roman time, the Capitol, but is now a museum of antiquities, and many of us visited Les Jardins de la Fontaine, which are on the site of the Roman public baths, which were built round the sacred spring of Nemausus. Returning to the Hostel at night, Mr. Bradley managed to get lost, to the amusement of the boys.

On Monday we travelled twenty-two kilometres by diesel train to the Pont du Gard, a marvellous example of Roman architecture, forty-nine metres high and 269 metres long. We walked along the top of this impressive monument in the channel through which water used to flow. From here we continued to Avignon.

We spent the next morning in going round the Palais des Papes and dancing on the famous Pont d'Aviognon, and the afternoon in moving from cafe to cafe. Many of us went to the pictures in the evening, and managed to understand the films fairly well, afterward retiring to bed with the " Mistral " tearing at our window-shutters.

On Wednesday we went to Le Lavandou, passing through Toulon on the way. This was our first sight of the Mediterranean, and a few of us bathed. Three varieties of wine were provided with dinner, and two of our leaders were seen ascending a flag-pole on the quay at night. Our hotel was called " La Cigale," as were about one in five of all French hotels.

Next morning we started off to walk bare-legged through many miles of country covered with every variety of prickly plant. We stopped for lunch on the way, and Mr. Bradley being in an aggressive mood, there was a free fight. Several boys took photos, at great personal risk, of the combatants. After all the damage had been repaired we pushed on, and, after a somewhat uncomfortable walk, we arrived at Cavaliere, where Mr. Bradley entered the water without removing_ his shapeless hat, which was not seen again. After feeding, we boarded a train and travelled to Cavalaire, where we stayed at a very good hotel.

As soon as we arrived there was a general rush for the nearest "Patisserie." In the evening we had a lecture from an English­man on " Dowsers," and discovered that two of the party possessed hitherto unsuspected powers. When we retired to bed we dis­covered that our rucsacks had been occupied by large numbers of ants, and at least one of the party spent an uncomfortable night.

On Friday we reached St. Raphael by train and walking, and discovered that the Hostel was, as usual, on the other side of the town. The Hostel was very artistic, being (perhaps) an old Roman theatre, " Le theatre du Soleil," but we had to sleep practically in the open air, and the food was not very appetising ; in fact, only Mr. Bradley seemed to enjoy it. The next day we spent in sun­bathing and exploring the town.

We spent fifteen hours of Sunday in a train bound for Paris.

On Monday morning we went round Notre Dame and saw many of the chief sights of Paris, the Tuileries, the Arc de Triomphe and, from the outside, the Louvre, among many others. We had the afternoon free and explored Paris, making full use of the " Metro,' to see such famous monuments as the Eiffel Tower. We had an excellent dinner served by a waiter who spoke very good English. In the evening most of us went to the Opera and saw two ballets and a one-act opera by Ravel. Comments were passed by the management upon the clothing of one of the leaders and on the bad habit of taking bottles to the Paris Opera House. We returned to the Youth Hostel early next morning.

We started back on Tuesday. We were all very cold and were glad to arrive at Newhaven, in spite of the trouble of going through the Customs examination, and arrived in Sheffield at about half past ten.

R. B. C.

The Prize Poem.

TO A SCIENTIST.

WHEN in my ears a strange tale you unfold,
How Earth is but a dust-mote in the beam
Which men call Space, and like blind creatures seer
To grope for knowledge of an age untold
When all began, and ancient Chaos rolled
Asunder in a million galaxies
And when you tell how in the outer skies
Consuming heat meets sempiternal cold ;
You mock : "Amid this vast and senseless strife
Of warring atoms, what God cares for thee,
A futile thing, seen in Eternity,
Who to a chance owes his unmeaning life? "
I say, " Cease, scoffer ; no man can gainsay
That which within my soul abides alway."

B. M.

Sehnsucht.

DAY is over, and I wander
Listless through the deep'ning twilight,
Through the cold and wintry twilight,
Chilled by wet winds wildly blowing
From the misty sunset yonder,
Blowing chilly from the mountains,
O'er the wild and barren mountains,
-Land of pinewoods, rocks and heather,
Icy waters ever flowing
From their black unfathomed fountains,
Down the dun cloughs rushing, falling ;
Home of mists and stormy weather,
Huge, engulfing, soul-appalling,
Where the howling tempests gather,
And the cold winds, wildly blowing
Down the heath and swiftly sweeping
O'er the moorland, down the river,
From the bleak forbidding mountains.
Still I hasten on and shiver
In the early springtime gloaming,
And there comes a yearning o'er me,
Long within my bosom sleeping
Now I see, 'mid verdure roaming,
Sunlit fields and flowers before me,
And a river calmly flowing
Through a fair and age-old city,
Through a tower-embattled city.
Here is peace. Softly blowing
Breezes from a purple heaven
In this springtime twilight hour
Warm the soul ; Zephyr-driven
Golden-smiling cloudlets billow
Crimson-fringed ; the sun declining
Lights with rays blood-red shining
Shimmering spire and mellow tower,
Budding tree and river-willow.
All is still-a young lamb calling
Plaintive o'er the mossy hedgerow­
Still again ; save on the river
Overhung with drooping willows,
Whose reflections scarcely quiver,
Glides a boat, and through the shallows
Swings round, oars slowly
Rising, falling, rising, falling,
Till it stirs the mirrored willows,
Sets the ancient stonework dancing
Underneath the rippling archway.
Still once more ; silent wholly ;
-Now a late lark gaily singing,
Higher and still higher winging
Heralds in the night advancing
Soon night's black-fringed pall comes falling,
Dim, mysterious, enthralling,
Man and beast alike entrancing,
Softly o'er the landscape falling . . .
Peace ! Peace! Ah, 'tis dreaming
Cease to tempt me, idle seeming !
Yet I know that peace is given,
Breathing from the sky at even,
Breathing from the golden heaven,
In the country of my dreaming
For I hear the voices calling
When the wind blows from the mountains
And the wintry night is falling,
Voices calling, ever calling,
Voices echoing, fleeing, falling
" Peace ! Peace ! The larks are crying !
Peace ! The woods and fields replying . . .
Peace ! Twilight, dying, dying . . .
Peace ! . . . Peace ! . . ."

B. M.

Catullus VII.

LIVE we, Lesbia, love we, sweet,
At a farthing estimate
All the talk of stern old men.

Suns may set and rise again ;
We, when dies our fleeting light,
Sleep through one eternal night.

Give me kisses thousandfold,
Give a hundred ; wilt withhold
Other thousand, hundred more ?
Yet a thousand, I implore,
And a hundred.

So, my pride,
When our kissing's multiplied
Into millions, then the sum
We'll confuse, lest any come
Envious-eyed, to see such bliss,
And to number ev'ry kiss.

H. F. G.

Spain

BLACK and disfigured are the fields once green
And undulant. Now they are pitted deep,
Shell-scarred and blasted. Cities again sleep
Free from the searching fear of death, yet mean
Tumbled spectres of what they should have been.
In new-swollen cemeteries widows weep
With fatherless children, afraid to keep
Memories of what they have so lately seen.

Victory reigns ! The land rejoices now.
Triumph boasts his might in flagged eminence.
Victory ! Defeat ! What of then both ? For how
Can the widow triumph, whose whole small world
Is wrecked, never to be repaired, though immense
Be the flag that Victory has unfurled ?

H. C. R.

Sentiments on Leaving.

FEEL an urge
To purge
I meditate
On how to liquidate
I am inclined
To creep up from behind
And eliminate
People I hate
I have a desire
To play the lyre
Or is it the fiddle
Whilst watching a fire
Of what no riddle
With rancour
I hanker
To demolish abolish
Erase and expunge
To extinguish
I languish
I yearn
I strive
To burn
Alive
Dewinged
Flies
To gouge out
Eyes
Alas poor me
Repressed
You see

H. E. S.

Athletic Sports

MARCH 25TH, 1939.

If the general standard of enthusiasm and performance in this ar's Sports was rather inferior to that shown last year, we nevertheless had the delight of watching one well-trained, enthusiastic and stylish runner put up a series of really good performances, and another hard worker bring off a high jump which only just failed to beat the School record. G. H. Parsons and G. I. Chapman deserve every credit for their success ; they each tackled the job with a proper humility and perseverance. (Humility means realising that you have got a lot to learn that is worth learning, and perseverance means having the guts to stick to the job of trying to learn it). Both these things are enormously important in every branch of Athletics. When we get to our new, level playing field-which in itself should be a great encouragement-we shall hope to see a great increase in the rather small number of people who will take the Sports in this humble and persevering spirit. Performances will be better almost automatically on the new track, but even then, a great part of the foundation for them is still going to be laid in the School Close, where you can slip out for a quarter or half an hour, and do the work which will raise our average performances on Sports Day to a really respectable level. Average results in the last few years have not been really good perhaps they could not be but there will soon be no excuse left, and it will be time to make good use of the opportunities we shall enjoy.

A. B.

OPEN EVENTS.                                                                                          

100 YARDS. 1St, Parsons, G. H. ; 2nd, Bennett, G. T. ; 3rd, Mortimer, J. H.

Time, 12 sec.

220 YARDS.-lst, Parsons, G. H. ; 2nd, Wheatley, P. J. ; 3rd, Macallum, J. H.

Time, 26.2 sec.

QUARTER MILE.-lst, Parsons, G. H.; 2nd, Burkinshaw, P. L. ; 3rd, Wheatley, P. J.

Time, 62 sec.

HALF MILE.- 1st, Parsons, G. H. ; 2nd, Townsend, R. V. ; 3rd, Burkinshaw, P. L.

Time, 2 min. 25 sec.

ONE MILE.-1St, Parsons, G. H. ; 2nd, Townsend, R. V. ; 3rd, Wade, L. M.

Time, 5 min 33.4 sec.

HIGH JUMP.-1st, Chapman, G. I. ; 2nd, Pearson, R. G. ; 3rd, Howarth, J. A.

Height, 5 ft. 3.25 in.

LONG JUMP.-lst, Wheatley, P. J. ; 2nd, Stamp, 1t. ; 3rd, Moffat, R. C.

Length, 17 ft. 9.25 in.

CHAMPION ATHLETE.-Parsons, G. H.

 

100 YARDS. 14-15 years : 1st, Winston, D. ; 2nd, Dronfield, R. ; 3rd, Wheatley, M. F.

Time, 12.6 sec.

12-14 years : 1st, Kitchin, P. T. ; 2nd, Poole, F. A. ; 3rd, Major, B. B.

Time, 14 sec.

10-12 years : 1st, Reeve, D. E. D..; 2nd, Tomlinson, J. W.; 3rd, Milner, G. R.

Time, 14.6 sec.

Under 10 years : 1st, Cooper, J. E. ; 2nd, Robinson, M. A. ; 3rd, Wreghitt, P. H.

Time, 16 sec.

220 YARDS.-14-15 years : 1st, Winston, D. ; 2nd, Dronfield, R. ; 3rd, Jowitt, G. A. and Sheppard, M.

Time, 28.8 sec.

12-14 years : 1st, Bird, J. D. ; 2nd, Kitchin, P. T. ; 3rd, Poole, E. A.

Time, 31 sec.

10-12 years : 1st, Reeve, D. E. D. ; 2nd, Butcher, P. H. ; 3rd, Gilfillan, A. E.

Time, 32 sec.

Under 10 years : 1st, Cooper, J. E. ; 2nd, Carlisle, J. M. ; 3rd, Wreghitt, P. H.

Time, 36.2 sec.

QUARTER MILE.-14-15 years : 1st, Wilson, A. L. ; 2nd, Oliver, J. G. ; 3rd, Foggitt, G. H.

Time, 71.1 sec.

12-14 years : 1st, Hemingway, R. G. ; 2nd, Bird, J. D. ; 3rd, Butler, D. R.

Time, 74.6 sec.

Under 12 years : 1st, Reeve, D. E. D.; 2nd, Milner, G. R.; 3rd, Sheppard, P.

Time, 79.1 sec.

HALF MILE HANDICAP.-1st, Townsend, R. V. (43 yds.) ; 2nd, Slater, W. D. (33 yds.) ; 3rd, Dodge, K. S. (44 yds.).

ONE MILE HANDICAP.-1st, Oliver, J. G. (103 yds.) ; 2nd, Dodge, K. S. (66 yds.) ; 3rd, Slater, W. 1). (33 yds.).

HIGH JUMP.-12-15 years : 1st, Oliver, J. G. ; 2nd, Wheatley, M. F. ; 3rd, Thompson, J. E.

Height, 4 ft. 3.5 in.

Under 12 years : 1st, Milner, G. R. ; 2nd, Reeve, D. E. D. ; 3rd, Butcher, P. H.

Height, 3 ft. 9 in.

LONG JUMP.-12-15 years : 1st, Dronfield, R. ; 2nd, Granville, P. S. ; 3rd, Holmes, S. H.

Length, 14 ft. 11 in.

Under 12 years : 1st, Reeve, D. E. D. ; 2nd, Bleakley, R. H. ; 3rd, Milner, G. R.

Length, 13 ft. 9.5 in.

OBSTACLE RACE.-Over 12 years : 1st, Bywaters, K. R. ; 2nd, Beardsmore, W. J. ; 3rd, Harrison, J. G.

 

Under 12 years : 1st, Wilson, M. B. ; 2nd, Simpson, J. H. ; 3rd, Holmes, M. T.

 

SACK RACE.-Over 12 years : 1st, Bywaters, K. R. ; 2nd, Simpson, A. H.

 

Under 12 years : 1st, Horn, G. ; 2nd, Heys, G.

 

OLD Boys' RACE.-1st, Mellor, P. L. ; 2nd, Fretwell, R. A.

 

RELAY RACES.

 

SENIOR SCHOOL-Over 14 years : 1st, Clumber ; 2nd, Chatsworth ; 3rd, Wentworth.

 

Under 14 years : 1st, Haddon ; 2nd, Arundel ; 3rd, Chatsworth.

 

JUNIOR SCHOOL.-1st, Saxons ; 2nd, Normans ; 3rd, Angles.

 

TUG-of-WAR.­

 

SENIOR SCHOOL. Over 14 years : Chatsworth beat Arundel ; Under 14 years : Haddon beat Arundel.

 

JUNIOR SCHOOL.-Britons beat Angles.

 

NOTE.--Since the School Sports G. H. Parsons has run at the White City, London, in the Under 16 100 yards and 250 yards of the Public School Sports, and acquitted himself very well, although he did not get into the finals.

G. I. Chapman has won fourth place in the Under 19 High Jump of the Northern Counties Athletic Association, at Bradford.

Swimming.

THE SWIMMING SPORTS, TUESDAY JULY 4th.

THE most outstanding feature of this year's Swimming Sports was the rather amazing fact that no less than five records were broken and one equalled. This, together with the fact that the number of swimmers in the Senior School has now increased to 400, shows a marked improvement in the standard of swimming, not only of individuals, but in the School as a whole.

Foggitt, G. H., is to be heartily congratulated on breaking two records and equalling a third. It is interesting to note that in two of these three events, the record was previously held by M. H. Taylor, who is now one of the best swimmers in the world, and it is not too much to hope that Foggitt will follow in the footsteps of his distinguished predecessor.

Okell, W. F. and Foggitt, R. H., provided the best race of the day in the two lengths Breast Stroke (Open) which ended in a very narrow victory for Okell. Both swimmers beat the previous record for the distance. The times for both relays were considerably reduced, in the Seniors by Wentworth and in the Juniors by Welbeck. In the latter case, 12;; secs. were knocked off the previous record !

Another individual achievement which deserves special mention was the success of Pickering, F. B., in the two lengths (Open) Back Stroke event. For a boy in the Second Form to win an open event is certainly remarkable, and his style at back crawl is so good that he is bound to improve with age. Great things will be expected of him in the future.

The House Trophy was won by Wentworth with a very sub­stantial lead over Welbeck, while the individual championship which is decided on " open " events, is held jointly by Roycroft, ,J. S. and Foggitt, G. H.

At the end of the Sports, Mr. Arnold Brittain presented the new Water Polo Cup, the gift of Old Boys of Wesley College, to the School, and the various trophies to the winning competitors.

RESULTS.

OPEN EVENTS.

Free Style (1 length). 1, Roycroft, J. S. ; 2, Coldwell, K.; 3, Leeson, R. G. 18" secs.

Free Style (3 lengths).--1, Roycroft, J. S. ; 2, Parkin, M. ; 3, Linsley, D. W. 73 secs.

Breast Stroke (2 lengths).-I, Okell, W. F. ; 2, Foggitt, R. H. ;

3, Coldwell, K. Record. 51.6 sees. (Previous record, 52.8 secs.,

Holden, A.).

Back Stroke (2 lengths).-1 Pickering, F. B. ; 2, Foggitt, R. H. ;

3, Corner, J. E. D. 55.2 secs.

Style Swimming.-(a) 1 length Breast Stroke and 1 length Old English

Back Stroke : 1, Upton, J. H. P. ; 2, Foggitt, R. H. (b) I length

Front Crawl and 1 length Back Crawl.-1, Foggitt, G. H. ;

2, Pickering, F. B.

Neat Dive. 1, Foggitt, G. H. ; 2, Drake, H. ; 3, Foggitt, R. H.

Long Plunge.-1, Rogers, H. C. ; 2, Swycher, D. D. ; 3, Okell, W. F.

38 ft. 11 in.

HOUSE RELAY (SENIOR)-FOR THE MELLING CUP.

1, Wentworth-Foggitt, G. H.; Parkin, 'K.; Leeson, R. G. ;

Linsley, D. W.

2, Arundel-Dale, H. M. ; Phaff, E. N. ; Hall, J. H. ; Coldwell, K.

Record. 811 sees. (Previous record, 851 sees, Lynwood).

UNDER 15.

Neat Dive.-1, Major, G. G. ; 2, Johnson, L. ; 3, Martin, D. S. W.

AGE 14-16.

Free Style (2 lengths).-1, Foggitt, G. H. ; 2, Swycher, D. D. ;

3, Dale, H. M. Record. 421 sees. (Previous record 451 sees,

Taylor, M. H.)

Breast Stroke (1 length).-1, Foggitt, G. H. ; 2, Middleton, J. ;

3, Macallum, J. H. Record, 211 sees. (Previous record, 241 sees.,

Holden, A.).

Back Stroke (1 length).-1 Foggitt, G. H. ; 2, Thompson, J. A.

3, Howarth, H. A. 25 secs. (equals previous record).

UNDER 14.

Free Style (1 length).-I, Pickering, F. B. ; 2, Leeson, J. M. ;

3, Stones, E. C. 201 secs.

Breast Stroke (1 length).-1, Wolstenholme, M. ; 2, Strange, G. ;

3, Mallinson, R. 30 sees.

Back Stroke (1 length).-1, Stones, F_. C. ;       2, Milnes, J. P. ;

3, Thompson, J. E. 275 secs.

HOUSE RELAY (UNDER 14).

1, Welbeck-Pickering, F. B. ; Tym, J. F.; Bird, J. D.;

Newton, J. R.

2, WENTWORTH-Leeson, J. M. ; Stones, F. C. ; Tanner, A. J. ;

Glatman, S. Record. 100 sees. (Previous record, 1121 secs.,

Chatsworth).

HOUSE TROPHY.

 

Points   Points   Total.

 

Swimmers.       Events.

 

1. Wentworth ..            103      ..          226      ..          329

 

2. Welbeck      ..          98        ..          82        ..          180

 

3. Sherwood    ..          101      ..          74        ..          175

 

4. Arundel        ..          93        51        ..          144

 

5. Clumber       ..          103      ..          31        ..          134

 

6. Chatsworth ..            98        ..          31        ..          129

 

7. Lynwood      ..          102      ..          25        ..          127

 

8. Haddon        ..          93        ..          0          93

 

` DAILY INDEPENDENT " CHALLENGE SHIELD.

 

To be held by the Champion Swimmer.

 

Awarded to      Foggitt, G. H.

 

Roycroft,          S.

J.

 

'total number of swimmers, 400.

 

SWIMMING MATCHES.

 

On May 13th, against Leeds Grammar School, at Leeds.

 

Leeds Grammar School ..         ..          ..          41 points.

 

King Edward VII School          ..          ..          21        „

 

Team.-Roycroft, 'J. S. ; Coldwell, K. ; Foggitt, R. H. ;

 

Okell, W. F. ; Foggitt, G. H. ; Leeson, J. M.

 

On June 21st, against Nottingham High School, at Nottingham.

 

King Edward VII School          ..          ..          28 points.

 

Nottingham High School           ..          ..          10 „

 

Team. Roycroft, J. S. ; Coldwell, K. ; Foggitt, R. H.

 

Okell, W. F. ; Foggitt, G. H. ; Leeson, J. M. ; Pickering, F. B.

 

ROYAL LIFE SAVING SOCIETY.

 

AWARDS ALREADY GAINED SINCE SEPTEMBER, 1938.

 

Elementary Certificates ..          ..          , ,         35

 

Intermediate Certificates           ..          ..          ..          40

 

Bronze Medals and Bars for Medal ..    ..          32

 

Silver Medals and Award of Merit        ..          ..          3

 

Instructors' Certificates ..          . ,         , .         5

 

AWARDS TO BE TAKEN THIS TERM.

 

Bronze Medal and Bronze Bar. .           ..          12

 

Intermediate     ..          .           10

 

Silver Medal     ..          . ,         . ,         . ,         2

 

Instructors'       ..          ..          . ,         , ,         , ,         3

 

LIFE SAVING EXAMINATION, 17TH MARCH, 1939.

 

Silver (Award of Merit).

 

Chamberlain, P. B.

 
First Class Instructor.
Coldwell, K. ; Chamberlain, P. B.
Second Class Instructor.
Burnham, D. C. ; Foggitt, R. H. ; Roycroft, J. S.
Bronze Bar.
Burnham, D. C. ; Bain, G. ; Malby, P. H. ; Marlow, J. D.
Bronze Medallion.
Aubrey, R. J. ; Drake, H. ; Emmott, J. G. ; Hiller, N. R. ; Harrison, J. G. ; McKenzie, R. ; Middleton, J. E. ; Moxon, P. B. ; Oakes, P. H. ; Pearson, R. G. ; Wilcock, D. W. ; Wilson, K. V.
Intermediate.
Gregory, J. M. T. ; Hitchcock, B. ; Johnson, F. G. ; Longdon, T. S. ; Martin, D. S. W. ; Pickering, F. B. ; Redfern, S. I. ; Thompson, J. E. ; Wolstenholme, T. T.

HOUSE WATER POLO LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP.

This Term has seen the first House competition in Water Polo. The competition was played on the league system, and provided a very thrilling race for top position between Wentworth and Sher­wood. The league match between these two teams ended in a 1-1 draw and so at the end of the competition, they had to play off for the championship. Wentworth won a very exciting deciding game by 3 goals to 1, and so became the first holders of a beautiful silver cup which has been given to the School by the Old Boys of Wesley College. Since the competition began the House teams have been having a match every week, and there has been a great improvement in individual play and in team tactics, and it is hoped that the new Cup will act as an additional incentive for boys to practice during the winter for next year's competition.

           

Goals­

 
 

P.

W.

L.

D.

For

Agst.

Points.

Wentworth

7

6

0

1

40

3

13

Sherwood

7

6

0

1

26

3

13

Arundel ..

7

5

2

0

24

13

10

Lynwood

7

4

:3

0

15

15

8

Clumber

7

3

4

0

18

17

6

Welbeck

7

2

5

0

5

30

4

Chatsworth

7

1

6

0

9

24

2

Haddon ..

7

0

7

(1

1

26

0

Play off. Wentworth 3 goals, Sherwood 1 goal.

Sherwood Team. Roycroft, J. S. (Captain) ; Bolton, 1. G. ; Johnson, P. L. ; Cotton, J. M. ; Drake, H. ; Wilson, K. 1r. ; Johnson, L.

Wentworth Team. - Parkin, M. (Captain( ; Herring, N.; Foggitt, G. H. ; Foggitt, R. H. ; Linsley, D. W. ; Leeson, R. G. ; Swycher, H. D.

 

Open Fives Competition

Buckley

       
 

Buckley

     

Cotton

(15-8, 15-9)

Buckley

   
   

L (15-5, 15-7)

   

Howes

   

Buckley

 
 

Howes

 

(15-6, 15-11)

 

Howarth

(15-1, 15-1)

 

   
     
 

Fletcher

     
   

Fletcher

   
 

Dale

(15-0, 15-3)

   
       

Buckley

       

(17-15, 15-6)

 

R. H. Foggitt

     
   

Wheatley

   
 

Wheatley

(15-2, 15-1)

   
     

Wheatley

 
     

(15-3, 15-0)

 
 

Guite

Guite

   
   

((15-10, 11-15

   
 

G. H. Foggitt

15-8)

   
         

Cricket, 1939.

T HE 1st XI has had quite a successful season ; the matches against Leeds Grammar School and H. E. Pearson's XI, ended in the complete rout of the School but otherwise the reverses have been slight. Nine matches have been won, six lost and three drawn with the odds in our favour. There has been some exceptionally good bowling by Fletcher, and consistent batting by four or five members of the side ; Hutton has scored over 300 runs and Fletcher, Buckley and Wheatley over 200. Perhaps the best feature has been Buckley's catching. With Fletcher bowling and Buckley at forward short leg an average of two wickets a match have fallen !

The fielding has been good on the whole but some of the side, notably Holmes, Allsop and Hall, P. D., must try to be quicker and more awake.

P. J. W.

SECOND XI, 1939.

Up to the time of writing we notice that Yorkshire have only lost two matches. We have also only lost two matches. Why, you ask, have we not challenged the champions ? Also, the reason is not hidden under masses of shyness and self-consciousness ; the 2nd XI possesses none of that. It is, shortly, the fielding. How many times have we in the score-box gnashed our teeth as the ball has rippled past unsuspecting cover-point or rushed past fine-leg to

the boundary ? Dodge and Smith have, however, bowled extremely well, while Hall has batted consistently, although giving us a few anxious moments. Parfitt and Phillips have also improved in the later matches as our opening batsmen. Having won eight matches out of eleven little need be said about our captain, Parkin, except to mention his excellent innings of 45 against Derby School. Finally at the close of a very successful season there are only two things to be said, and they are, to thank the spectators who supported us in our matches, and to wish next year's 2nd XT good luck.

P. A. B.

I have enjoyed looking after the 2nd XI this term, as I have always enjoyed coaching people who were keen on the game. As usual we started with grave doubts about them, but Parkin has encouraged them into becoming a reasonably good side.

I must record one incident in this term's cricket which will not be reported elsewhere. The scene is a house match. The last man, an elderly member of the sixth form, is coming in to bat. At the bowler's end stands a member of 2D who has been batting solidly for some overs. As sixth form prepares to receive the ball 2D solemnly calls out " Play 'em so-and-so." Sixth form is bowled and as they walk out is heard, equally solemnly, apologising.

P. F. T.

FIRST XI MATCHES.

FIRST X1 v. F. T. Saville's X1.

Played at Whiteley Woods, Wednesday, May 3rd. Mr Saville won the toss and decided to bat first. Our bowling was steady, but efficient. Thirsk and Burdekin fell to Gilfillan in his first four overs, while Mr. Brearley was out to Fletcher's third ball. Buckley's bowling did not become fatal until his second three overs, but together with Olivant's two wickets and Wigley's one wicket and two commendable catches, his three wickets helped to bring Mr. Saville's XI out for 70.

After an encouraging stand by Fletcher and Hutton, the score 42 stood until three wickets had fallen. The collapse was completed, but not until three 4 byes had helped to bring the total to within tour of the 70. Twenty one maidens in Forty overs speaks well of the bowling of Fulford, Morrell, Burdekin and Thirsk.

 

REVELATION, CHAPTER XX.

Watercolour, A. J. Whitaker (2R)

 

MOSES IN THE MOUNTAIN (EXODUS XXXII)

colour, J. Meakin (41?)

 

LANDSCAPE

Watercolour, K. D. Harrison    1 (3R)

F. T. SAVILLE'S XI.

 

K.E.S.

 

Brearley, b. Fletcher, L. W.     

10

Fletcher, L. W., b. Fulford, J. M.

17

Thirsk, C., b. Gilfillan, G. R.     

6

Hutton, K. C., b. Thirsk G

17

Burdekin, J. T., b. Gilfillan, G. R..

5

Wheatley, P. J., b. Fulford, J. M.       

0

Melling, F., c. and b. Wigley, W. E.

14

Buckley, T.R., c Norris, W., b. Morrell, F. C

8

Fulford, J. M., b. Olivant, J. K.

9

Gilfillan, G. R., b. Fulford, J. M.

3

Morrell, F. C., c. Wigley, W. E., b. Olivant, J. K.

7

Holmes, S. H., c. Thirsk, C., b. Morrell, F. C.

1

Hermitte, G., b. Buckley, T. R.

2

Olivant, J. K., b. Fulford, J. M.

1

Norris, W., b. Buckley, T. R.

0

Hall, P. D., c. Brearley, b. Fulford, J. M.

5

Saville, M. V., l.b.w. Fletcher, L. W

9

Cotton, J. M., b. Morrell, F. C.

1

White, A., b. Buckley, T. R.

1

Turner, D. E., b. Fulford, J. M.

0

Saville, F. T., out out   

0

Wigley, W. E.,., not out

0

Extras  

7

Extras  

14

 

70

 

67

Buckley, :3 for 13; Gilfillan, 2 for 17; Fletcher 2 for 18 ; Wigley 1 for 7 ;
Olivant, 2 for 3; Holmes 0 for 6.

Fulford, 6 for 16; Morrell, 3 for 8; Burdekin, 0 for 5; Hermitte 0 for 8; White 0 for 8 ; Thirsk, 1 for 8.

   

School lost by 3 runs.

 

FIRST Xl v. BRADFORD GRAMMAR SCHOOL.

Played at Bradford, on Saturday, May 6th. Wheatley lost the toss and the School fielded first. Bradford started very slowly, the first wicket falling at 17 after 50 minutes play. The next five wickets tell for three runs and Bradford were all out for 51. The School started confidently as on the previous Wednesday, Fletcher and Hutton scoring 32 before fletcher was run out. Then as before, came a most extraordinary and unaccountable collapse, the next nine wickets falling for fourteen runs.

Bradford then batted again but treated our bowling with scant respect, scoring 90 for 3 before declaring, leaving the School to get 96 runs in 35 minutes. Wheatley and Fletcher opened but after scoring a single off every ball in the first over Wheatley was bowled. Buckley then joined Fletcher and the score mounted rapidly. Fletcher left after scoring 14 and Hutton came in. Buckley was hitting the ball all round the field by this time and he and Hutton carried the score to 80 before Hutton was run out. Holmes joined Buckley and when the last over was called seven runs were still required. Holmes played the first ball to mid-off and a short run was taken; Buckles then promptly got two fours, carrying his score to 51 obtained in 26 minutes.

BRADFORD G.S.

 

KES.

 

1st Innings.

 

1st Innings.

 

Jowett, D., l.b.w., b. Fletcher           

9

Fletcher, L. W., run out

17

Farnell, c Holmes b. Wigley

6

Hutton, K. C., c. Ambler, b. Hirst ....

8

Hymas, b. Gilfillan

15

Wheatley, P. J., c. Sutcliffe b. Hobson

1

Hobson, G. H., l.b.w., b Fletcher

0

Buckley, T. R., b. Hobson

0

Keighley, l.b.w., b Fletcher

0

Gilfillan, G. R., run out

4

Denby, R. N., l.b.w., b. Wigley

3

Holmes, S. H., l.b.w., b. Hobson

I

Ambler, E., b. Olivant

0

Olivant, J. K., l.b.w., b. Hobson

4

Brown, c. Fletcher, b. Olivant

4

Gunter, P. J., l.b.w., b. Hobson           

3

Sutcliffe, c. Hall, b. Fletcher

2

Hall, P. D., b. Walsh

0

Walsh, l.b.w., b Gilfillan

0

Wigley, W. E., stumped Turner, b. Hobson

0

Hirst, out out   

5

Turner, D. E., not out   

0

Extras  

7

Extras  

8

     

-

 

51

 

46

 

--

   

Buckley, 0 for 3 ; Gilfillan, 2 for 8; Fletcher, 4 for 14; Holmes, 0 for 7; Wigley, 2 for 4 ; Olivant, 2 for 8.

Walsh, 1 for 4 ; Hobson, 6 for 22 ; Hirst, 1 for 12.

 

PERSEUS AND ANDROMEDA
Watercolour, J. F. Tym (2R)

120

 

1ST XI v. LEEDS GRAMMAR SCHOOL.

The match was played at Leeds, on May 13th, in glorious weather, the School side fielding first. Our bowling opened good and steady, as usual, but after a cautious start the Leeds batsmen soon settled down to scoring off every other ball. Excellent batting throughout most of the afternoon brought up the formidable score of 206 by half-an-hour after the tea interval.

Having seen last week's performance at Bradford, none of us were very doubtful that we should be able to play off this trivial score and give the Leeds side a good beating. Our doubts, however, grew as Gilfillan, Buckley and Wheatley were dismissed for almost negligible scores, but with Fletcher still batting steadily and confidently we still had hopes of a partnership which would raise our score to compare with Leeds'. The Grammar School bowling did not slacken and our hopes were soon dashed. Our innings came to an abrupt end when Hall was run out by the bowler. And the score was only 61.

 

1ST XI V. DERBY SCHOOL FIRST XI.

The match was played at Whiteley Woods on May 20th, the School side batting first for the first time this season. Fletcher and Hutton opened for the School, the former soon being caught out. Hutton batted with Gilfillan, but the partnership was broken when Gilfillan was run out, more through slow running than anything else. The following batsmen were got out while Hutton kept the score rising steadily mainly in fours until he was caught out by Cawthorn, having contributed 43 to the total of 89.

The School seemed in a fairly strong position when Derby opened their innings, and hopes of victory rose as Buckley caught Holt the opening batsman-by a spectacular, if not very difficult, catch from Fletcher's ball. Gilfillan's two catches and Buckley and Fletcher's bowling brought the Derby team out for 55 concluding an interesting but not exciting game.

 

1st XI V. THE COLLEGIATE XI.

The match was played at Abbeydale in glorious sunshine on Wednesday, Slay 24th. The School won the toss and batted first on a perfect wicket. Throughout the innings the Collegiate seemed determined to make the most of their bowling. The first wicket to fall Fletcher's unfortunately-was by the fourth bowler. The fifth bowler Wheatley D. F. brought father and son together but we thought this novelty rather expensive when Wheatley 1). F. caught and bowled Buckley and howled Holmes. Still Wheatley P. J. survived the worst his father could do as sons always do and was bowled by the Collegiate's seventh bowler. After yet two more bowlers had done their best, our tail end, with the aid of Hutton who had been batting steadily throughout, was raising the score as quickly as the opening few. Even when Hutton was bowled by Outram the second bowler who had had a thorough rest-Burgin and Wigley still kept in, and after the Collegiate had changed the bowler nearly every over for some time the Collegiate scorer expressed the situation well when he said, '' 'rile Collegiate have played about with these chaps so long, they can't get 'em out now." But Burgin did happen to be run out and Wheatley_ so wanted his tea that lie declared at 158 for 9 wickets.

Buckley and Gilfillan opened the bowling, the former taking Wheatley D. F.'s wicket with the score at 13. Stamp's consistent efficiency behind the wicket was rewarded when lie caught Joyce out off a ball from Fletcher. Lakin, however, remained immovable throughout the innings and was still going when stumps were drawn. Apart from a catch by Holmes in the out­field and Fletcher's catch from his own ball to Winch, there was nothing more exciting in the innings

It must be remarked that the idea of playing twelve men a side was the Collegiate's and not altogether in agreement with the School's usual practices.

4 

1ST XI V. H. E. PEARSON'S XI.

The match was played at Whiteley Woods on Whit-Tuesday, May 30th, in brilliant sunshine and tropical heat.

The story of the School's first innings is easily told. Pearson was in unusually good form, so that when Hutton's wicket fell for nought and Fletcher's for thirteen there was small wonder that the rest followed in quick succession, none for more than five.

With a score of 44, the School had still hopes of getting out what seemed a bowling side for even less than this score. Our bowling, however, soon proved inadequate, although Titchmarsh was out for five and Ambler made only twenty four. There still seemed a faint hope when the fourth and fifth wickets fell at 40, but this hope was rudely shattered as the score rose to 81 before the next wicket fell.

The School, undaunted, batted a second innings and, in the absence of Pearson's bowling managed to make 75. Out of this total, Holmes scored 32 and still had his wicket when stumps were drawn.

 

1ST XI V. MOUNT ST. MARY'S COLLEGE.

The match was played at Spinkhill on Saturday, May 27th, the School batting first. Fletcher opened the innings very cautiously and in the first half-hour only a. Jew odd runs had been scored. Hutton, however, was a little bolder and after a four and a two was then bowled out by the opening bowler. Holmes followed, to stay in for the collapse of Fletcher's and the next four wickets and to put twenty runs on the score. Burgin made a valuable stand and encouraged the tail end to put on about forty runs to the sixty odd.

The School was in a strong position at the start of Mount St. Mary's innings, immediately after tea. The Mount had an hour and three quarters in which to reply to our 103 in two and half-hours. The first two wickets fell for two runs. The third and fifth wickets fell easily to Buckley and Fletcher's wiles, but the fourth batsman somehow survived and staved in for a partnership with the sixth batsman. The fielding side seemed to droop unaccountably at this period and the score began to mount with increasing rapidity. Five minutes from the end the Mount needed four runs to equalise ; but a hook to the boundary from a ball of Fletcher's decided the issue and the Mount batted confidently for one or two more fours to pass the School's total easily.

One cannot help thinking that any one of the three or four catches missed when the score was still round 70, might have secured for us an easy victory.

 

   

1ST XI v. DONCASTER GRAMMAR SCHOOL.
Played at Doncaster on June 3rd.

1ST XI V. WAKEFIELD GRAMMAR SCHOOL.

The match was played under tropical conditions at Whiteley - Woods on Wednesday, June 7th. Wakefield won the toss and decided to bat first. Buckley and «Wigley opened the bowling, and when the score stood at only 10 Olivant held a catch from Wigley's ball. A partnership was formed by the new pair of batsmen which put on 40 before Buckley, in the slips, held a catch from Olivant's ball. Yet another twenty was put on before a third catch went to Wigley from Burgin's ball, but the scoring began to taper off and the next wickets fell at 83, 89, 91, 92, 92, 92.

The School seemed to have a reasonable chance of beating the score of 92 in rather more than two hours, after tea. Fletcher was soon run out, however, through superior fielding, a hit from Button was held with an outstretched hand of Macaulay's, and Holmes was caught out, all before the score had passed eleven. Chances of winning now seemed very small. Wheatley and Buckley, however, fulfilled their obligations admirably. The Partnership put on fifty-two before Wheatley was clean bowled. Another partnership of Buckley and Gilfillan brought the score within three runs of victory. When Buckley was clean bowled, Olivant followed and found no difficulty in hitting a four to decide the issue finally.

1ST XI V. OLD EDWARDIANS.

The match was played at Whiteley Woods on Saturday, June 10th ; the weather was typical June weather, except for a slight drizzle at the end of the game. Wheatley is to be congratulated on winning the toss for the third time this season, and he used this fortune to advantage by choosing to field first.

Bateman and Thirsk opened the Old Boys' batting, but before the score had passed 22 Turner had caught them both out behind the wicket. Titch­marsh followed and managed to put on 23, which included four boundaries. It was not until after lunch, with the score less than 60 for 5, that Burdekin and Pearson formed a partnership which was to put 65 on the score. Even when this partnership was broken, Burdekin still kept on until, finally, the score reached the formidable total of 178.

The School went in with grim determination and spirits rose as they perceived that Pearson was not quite so good as he was on Whit-Tuesday. Fletcher lost his wicket, however, to a ball from Beard, for 22 and Holmes sent a catch to Pearson's ever-open hands when he had only made 2. At the tea interval the School had made 59 for 2 wickets. If luck held, there was still a good chance of winning. The first ball after tea, however, claimed Hutton's wicket (for 20 runs) and the score was 59 for 3. Buckley and Wheatley again fulfilled their obligations, and gradually the score rose nearer to 100. But after Wheatley had lost his wicket and after Gilfillan had knocked two boundaries, the tail end drooped. Each new batsman seemed capable of adding the few required runs, but our confidence was unrewarded. The tenth wicket fell at 110.

1ST XT V. CENTRAL SECONDARY SCHOOL.

The match was played at High Storrs on Wednesday, June 14th, in miser­able weather. Intermittent drizzle during the afternoon gave way to a sharp downfall at a quarter to six, and finally the match was stopped at about a quarter past six.

The other captain decided to bat first (that is a polite way of saying Wheatley lost the toss again). Buckley and Gilfillan opened the bowling and kept the scoring very slow, but it was not until Wigley took Gilfillan's end that the first wicket fell at 13. In the next four of his overs, Wigley took five more wickets. Fletcher then completed the good work by taking the last three wickets. The fall of the wickets was 13, 14, 18, 18, 18, 18, 24,  24, 31, 31, An account of this innings would be incomplete without reference to Turner's two stumped wickets and a catch behind the wicket, nor vet of Buckley's splendid one-handed catch at short leg.

The School's two or three opening batsmen seemed to think the position too true to be good. Fletcher missed the third ball and was clean bowled. Holmes followed and after hitting a catch to the same position three times and being missed twice, he was caught the third time. He did manage, however, to make 14. Hutton meanwhile batted steadily with the following batsmen until the score passed eighty with only five wickets down. The School then declared.

The Central School started their second innings in a fine drizzle and when the score was 13 for 2 and a repetition of their first inning's performance

The School's batting was opened by Fletcher surrendering to his third ball. Hutton, however, remained and got 15 runs before losing his wicket. A collapse followed, equalled only by Nottingham's ; but Gilfillan snatched the School from the jaws of defeat by making a stand for 17 runs as the 7th bat. The tail end very gallantly added the few runs which made our victory more substantial. 

1st X1 V. THE STAFF.

The School drew with the Staff at Whiteley Woods on Wednesday, June 21st.

The School batting was opened by Fletcher and Hutton, but the third ball from Waghorn, proved fatal to Fletcher. Hutton, however, remained and knocked up 57 in partnership with Holmes. After Holmes had been caught by Mr. Brearley in the slips, Wheatley came in to start his best innings of the season. During this innings Buckley was caught by Mr. Fletcher, so that four wickets were down when the School declared at 158. (Wheatley 60 not out).

When the Staff opened, the score had not passed 20 before Buckley bowled Messrs. Titchmarsh and Cumming in the same over. Mr. Brearley then formed a partnership with Mr. Waterhouse and raised the score to 79 before he was caught by Gilfillan. After this the School became masters of the situation and six wickets had been taken before stumps were drawn, the Staff's score standing at 97.

  

1ST XI V. NOTTINGHAM HIGH SCHOOL.

The match was played on the afternoon of Speech Day, Saturday, June 17th ; Nottingham batted first.

Buckley expressed the School's determination to give the opponents a sound beating and to finish off the match in good time for the Evening Performance, when he took the first wicket in the second ball of the match. But a period of 12 overs of very slow scoring followed until Gilfillan took the second wicket with the score at 18. A prolonged collapse then took effect and the next wickets fell at 20, 21, 26, 26, 28, 29, 36 and finally 36, all out. The rate of scoring seemed even slower than the wicket.

 

1ST Xl V. OLD EDWARDIANS.

The School won the match by three wickets on the School Close on Thursday evening, June 29th.

The School decided to field first and, after a determined opening by the Old Boys, Wigley claimed the first two wickets for a modest score of 23. Fletcher then came on to bowl and very soon proved fatal to Titchmarsh and two others, before the tea interval. After tea he continued the good work by taking three more wickets for no runs. (Buckley had the privilege of holding three catches from him at short leg). Bateman, however, survived all Fletcher's wiles and managed to knock 31 runs before being caught by Hutton from Wigley.

The Old Boys' score of 87 seemed a mere nothing to beat especially when Fletcher survived his third ball and went on to make 31 runs. The score rose steadily until the sixth wicket full at 86. Two runs were needed to win. The seventh wicket fell at 87 ; the eighth., ninth and tenth at 88.

 

 

1ST X1 V. CHESTERFIELD GRAMMAR SCHOOL.

The School lost by 7 runs in the match played at Chesterfield on the afternoon of Saturday, July 1st.

The School's innings opened tragically when Fletcher and Hutton were dismissed in the third and fourth overs with the score at 4. After Olivant had suffered the same fate, Wheatley came in for an innings which was to put on 28. Gunter, also, put on 19 runs as eighth man so that after Stamp had knocked a four and a three and had been caught out, the score stood at 82, all out.

Buckley and Wigley opened our bowling, and kept the scoring very slow. In his fifth over, Buckley took the first two wickets before their score had passed 20, and when Fletcher replaced Wigley he kept the wickets falling steadily. When the seventh, eighth and ninth wickets had fallen for 57 the School seemed sure enough of winning, but the eleventh man seemed equally sure that Chesterfield were going to win. Three sixes and two fours finally decided the issue.

1ST XI V. HYMER'S COLLEGE, HULL.

The School beat Hymer's College, Hull, by 137 runs, on Wednesday, July 5th, at Whiteley Woods, Sheffield.

The School batted first and opened well. Fletcher made 34, and when Hutton had lost his wicket for 13, Olivant followed for 18, Buckley for 33 and Wheatley for 14. After that four wickets fell with the score still in the 130's, but finally Stamp hit hard and brought the score to 159 for 10.

Hymer's College quickly lost their first two wickets before any score had been made and Buckley took the third wicket with the score at only 2. Three maiden overs followed and then Fletcher replaced Wigley. The results must have shattered any hopes which Hymer's College may have had. Three wickets fell in Fletcher's first over for no runs. The sixth wicket was down for 8 runs. The rest of the wickets were shared by Fletcher and Buckley; the tenth wicket fell for 22 runs.

 

 

 

 

 

BOWLING AVERAGES.

       

Overs

Maidens

Runs

Wickets

Average

Fletcher, L. W.

 

..

..

173.1

39

480

66

7.3

Burgin, H.

 

..

..

20.5

1

58

6

9.6

Olivant, J. K.

 

..

..

30

7

72

7

10.3

Buckley, T. R.

..

..

..

146.3

40

383

37

10.35

Wheatley, P. J.

 

..

..

18

6

53

5

10.6

Wigley, W. E.

..

..

..

110

29

277

24

11.5

Holmes, S. H.

..

..

..

26

4

92

7

13.1

Gilfillan, G. R.

..

..

..

88

14

253

14

18.0

BATTING AVERAGES.

   

Times

 

Most in

 
 

Innings

Not Out

Runs

an

Average

       

Innings

 

Buckley, T. R. ..

20

3

308

51*

18.0

Hutton, K. C   

20

0

348

57

17.4

Wheatley, P. J. ..

20

2

298

60*

16.0

Fletcher, L. W.

20

0

284

47

14.2

Holmes, S. H   

20

3

163

32*

9.6

Burgin, H         

8

1

66

28*

9.43

Olivant, J. K. ..

12

3

(34

24*

7.1

Gunter, P. J.

11

2

61

19*

6.8

Gilfillan, G. R. ..

16

2

87

17

6.2

Wigley, W. E. ..

14

5

00

22

5.5

Stamp, R.

5

2

27

13

9

Also Batted :-­

         

Rhodes, P.

1

 

13

13

13

Hall, P. 1).

5

 

14

6

2.8

Allsop, F.

8

 

23

6

2.6

Turner, D. E.

7

4

6

4*

2

Cotton, J. M.

1

0

1

1

1

SECOND XI MATCHES.

2ND XI V. WAKEFIELD GRAMMAR SCHOOL.

Played at Wakefield, June 7th. Wakefield went in first, but were soon in trouble, two wickets falling for 12 runs. Another wicket fell at 27 and the score soon reached 40. But at 40 Smith came on to bowl and in his first over got a wicket. This inspired Dodge, who took three wickets for no runs in seven balls, and Smith took the three remaining wickets in his next over, and Wakefield were all out for 50 runs.

Parfitt and Brawley gave us a good start by scoring 24 runs before they were separated, and we passed Wakefield's total for the loss of only four wickets. Wakefield Grammar School. 50. K.E.S. 51 for 4.

2ND XI V. OLD EDWARDIANS.

Played at Whiteley Woods, June 10th. The Old Edwardians batted first, and lost their first four wickets for 30 runs. At this stage, however, Welch and Powell came together and at lunch the score was 90 for 4. Immediately after lunch Welch was bowled for 54 runs, but Powell stuck there, and when the last wicket fell at 153, he was 54 not out. Our score proceeded steadily after tea, but at 126 for seven it began to rain heavily and play stopped for about twenty minutes. At the resumption, however, Phillips and Whatlin soon knocked off the runs and we won by four wickets.

Old Edwardians 153 (Welch 54, Powell 54 not out).

K.E.S. 154 for 7 wickets (Hall 36, Smith 21, Phillips 25 not out).

2ND XI V. NOTTINGHAM HIGH SCHOOL.

Played at Whiteley Woods, June 17th. We batted first and 50 runs were on the board for only three wickets. After Phillips and Hall were out the batting lacked initiative, and the last wicket fell at 85. Nottingham then went in, but could make little headway against the exceptionally good bowling of Dodge and Smith, and were all out for 44 runs.

K.E.S. 85.        Nottingham High School 44.

2ND XI. V. CHESTERFIELD GRAMMAR SCHOOL.

Played at Whiteley Woods, July 1st. Dodge and Smith opened our bowling and took six wickets for 29 runs between them, and it looked as though Chesterfield would be all out for about 50 runs. Their last wicket, however, added a valuable 20 runs to make their total 73.

We made a bad start and half our wickets were down for 35 runs, but Hall, aided by Smith and Marlow, rose nobly to the occasion and we passed their total for the loss of seven wickets.

Chesterfield Grammar School 73.         K.E.S. 74 for 7.

2ND XI v. LEEDS GRAMMAR SCHOOL.

Played at Whiteley Woods, May 13th. Leeds sent us in to bat first, and their bowlers had the upper hand completely. The first two wickets fell for no runs and our final total was 16. Leeds soon knocked these off to win by ten wickets.

K.E.S. 16.        Leeds Grammar School 17 for 0.

Junior School

CRICKET.

ONE cannot think of this season without remembering the great interest in the game shown by both parents and boys. We note, and are grateful for, the enthusiasm of the numerous parents who turn up, in some cases, every Saturday ; these after­noons, with the 1st XI playing some Middle School XI, and with most of the boys enjoying a swim in the bath afterwards, are acquiring a very enjoyable character of their own.

Not that the 1st XI has always won its match ; often, especi­ally early in the term, the batting has been weak, and once, when the Central Secondary School visited us, we were soundly beaten. But it must not be forgotten that in all these matches the Juniors have been giving away an advantage in age ; and no one who saw the match against Rotherham on Parents' Day can doubt that our XT has made sound progress. Robinson, always very useful as a wicket-keeper, has become a most steady opening bat, and his success has imparted a solidity to the side which was much needed. But we must confess and what a confession for a Yorkshire team !

  that the attack has not improved to the same extent ; the howling lacks sting, and the fielding, with the exception of Bleakley and Wood, D. W., has generally lacked both intelligence and determination. No team can afford to give such a display of " still life " in the field ; we want to see the side on its toes, thirsting for the blood of " the enemy".

On Thursdays we have done as well as the weather has per­mitted. One outside match was played, against Westbourne, in which the 1st XI lost by 16 runs, and the 2nd XI by only 1.

The House Competition has evoked the usual enthusiasm, generally expressed in rude remarks about other people's Houses or vain boastings about one's own ; but also in much keen play on the field. Incidentally we have had some very fine turn-outs for these afternoons too, once achieving the record of having every boy of the junior School, except four absentees, playing at Whiteley Woods.

   

RESULTS.

     
   

1st XI.

     
 

P.

W.

D.

L.

Points.

Osborn

4

4

0

0

8

Normans

4

2

0

2

4

Saxons

4

2

0

2

4

Angles

4

1

0

3

2

Britons

4

1

0

3

2

   

2ND XI.

     
 

P.

W.

D.

L.

Points.

Osborn

4

4

0

0

8

Angles

4

3

0

1

6

Saxons

4

2

0

2

4

Normans

4

1

0

3

2

Britons

4

0

0

4

0

   

3RD XI.

     
 

P.

W.

D.

L.

Points.

Osborn

4

3

0

1

6

Angles

4

3

0

1

6

Britons

4

2

0

2

4

Normans

4

1

0

3

2

Saxons

4

1

0

3

2

SWIMMING.

Free Style (1 length.)-1, Hind, J. A. ; 2, Mellor, I. G. ; 3, Ditchfield, A.

Beginners' Race (1 breadth). 1, Pearson, T. N. ; 2, Stanley, N. P. 3, Henderson, I.

Back Stroke (1 length). 1, Burwell, Y. R. 2, Mellor, 1. G. ; 3, Holmes. M. T.

Neat Dive. -1, Thompson, A. H. ; 2, Holmes, M. T. ; 3, Mellor, 1. G .

Diving for Plates.-1, Berry, T. E. ; 2, Thompson, A. H. 3, Ditchfield, A.

House Relay Race.-1, Saxons ; 2, Britons ; 3, Normans.

House Swimming Trophy.

I, Saxons

 

111 points.

2, Angles

  63

3, Normans

 

55

4, Britons

 

28

5, Osborn

 

4

 

 

Old Edwardians.

DEATHS.

FRANK ASHFORD (1928-1933). Fatally injured in a motor accident in April 1939. Aged 22.

RONALD GORDON ASKHAM (1922-1929). Died after illness on April 9th, 1939. Aged 25.

SIDNEY HAWLEY (1931-1937). Knocked down by a motor-car and fatally injured on May 12th, 1939. Aged 19.

JOHN SOUTHERN (1934-1938; afterwards at King's School, Ely). Died after illness on June 24th, 1939. Aged 13.

JOHN PEARSON MATHEWS (S.R.G.S. and K.E.S.) died on June 19th, 1939. Aged 49.

Dr. J. P. Mathews was a boy at the Grammar School, and in 1905 was a member of the first Sixth Form of K.E.S. and Captain of Arundel on the first formation of the Houses. He was Captain of Swimming, Football Secretary, and a prime mover in several of the new-born School Societies, notably the Microscopical Society which fostered the scientific interests of many of the leading boys. He left in 1907 with a Town Trust Scholarship to the University of Sheffield. He served in the war with the 3rd W.R. Field Ambulance and was mentioned in despatches in 1916. His medical career in Chesterfield and Sheffield is well-known to many of us, and not less his continued interest in the School. He was a trustee of the Grammar School Exhibition Fund, and at the Wesley College Centenary Reunion in 1937 he captained the Grammar School Cricket XI which played the Wesley College XI on the School Close.

MARRIAGES.

C. ASH (1925-1932), on February 18th, 1939, to Miss Ethel Pigott, of Sheffield.

S. BLATHERWICK (1927-1930), on June 24th, 1939, to Miss Elsie Peterkin, of Sheffield.

H. A. COLE (1921-1930), on March 22nd, 1939, to Miss Mary Hadfield, of Rotherham.

F. S. GALE (1922-1927), on June 17th, 1939, to Miss Lynda M. Carrington, of Sheffield.

Dr. K. J. G. MILNE (1915-1923), on June 10th, 1939, to Dr. Constance N. Jenkinson, of Sheffield.

J. F. NICHOLAS (1921-1933), on July 6th, 1939, to Miss Audrey M. Allen, of Sheffield and Froggatt.

J. R. SENIOR (1925-1929) on July 6th, 1939, to Miss Joan B. Ragg, of Sheffield.

H. TASKER (1922-1932), on June 24th, 1939, to Miss Elizabeth Curnow.

BIRTHS.

To Mr. and Mrs. ARNOLD W. LAMB, on June 25th, 1939, a son.

To Mr. and Mrs. H. C. HOWSON, on July 5th, 1939, a son.

A. L. HORNSBY (1923-1929) has been appointed Assistant Inspector of Police Colonial Service (Tropical Africa, East African Depend­encies). Address : Northern Rhodesia Police, Chingola, N. Rhodesia.

C. S. HALL (1908-1915) has been appointed Headmaster of Rutherford College, Newcastle-on-Tyne.

C. K. WRIGHT (1905-1915), Town Clerk of the Metropolitan Borough of Stoke Newington, is the author of The A.B.C. of Local Government (Evans Bros. 4s. 6d.).

E. M. TURNER (1922-1927) was ordained deacon in Sheffield Cathedral last June.

C. E. HOPKINSON (1919-1927) has a temporary appointment at Worksop College. Sheffield address : 46, Whirlow Lane, 11.

Rev. K. W. THORNTON (1923-1927) is a curate at Dundee Cathedral.

P. W. YOUENS has been appointed Colonial Administrative Officer in Sierra Leone.

L. N. WILD has been appointed Assistant Lecturer in Classics at the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth.

A. J. COLLINS has been running for the Sheffield Varsity Harriers first team, and obtained Half Colours ; also for Hallamshire Harriers, coming in 13th out of a field of 150 in the team which was second in the Yorkshire Junior Cross Country Championship.

L. R. KAY runs for Varsity Harriers second team ; and for Hallamshire Harriers ; 16th in the Yorkshire Junior Cross.

M. H. TAYLOR reduced his 220 yards free-style record from 2 m. 28 sec. to 2 m. 25.4 sec. in the Universities Athletic Union Championship at Leeds.

HEDLEY HOWE has just returned from Turkey in Asia Minor after a stay of 21 months in a small village in the interior where several British firms are building Turkey's first iron- and steel­works ; is now in charge of the civil engineering department of Messrs. Ashmore, Benson, Pease and Co., Ltd., of Stockton-on-Tees.

OXFORD.

C. K. THORNHILL, Queen's College ; Class I, Final Honours School of Mathematics.

G. I. M. BLOOM, St. John's College ; Class I, Final Honours School of Natural Science (Chemistry).

A. J. R. GREEN, Merton College ; Class II, Final Honours School of Natural Science (Animal Physiology).

R. F. S. KIRKHAM, University College ; Class III, Final Honours School of Natural Science (Animal Physiology).

D. N. D. ALLEN, Christ Church ; Junior Mathematical Scholarship.

G. D. BOLSOVER, New College ; Open Exhibition in Natural Science.

W. H. FLETCHER, Corpus Christi College ; Class II, Literae Humaniores,

L. S. BROWN, St. John's College ; Class II, Final Honour School of Mathematics.

L. A. MCQUILLIN, Merton College ; Class II, Final Honour School of Mathematics.

W. J. SMITH, University College ; Class II, Final Honour School of Politics, Philosophy and Economics.

S. G. SENTANCE, Merton College ; Class II, Final Honour School of History.

G. L. CAMM, New College ; The Johnson Memorial Prize.

J. H. WILLIAMS, Magdalen College ; Goldsmiths' Company's Exhibition.

CAMBRIDGE.

E. F. GOOD, Gonville and Caius College ; Class II, Natural Sciences Tripos, Part I. College Prize for a First Class in the Inter­

collegiate Examination in Natural Sciences.

M. V. SAVILLE ; Choral Exhibition at St. Catherine's College.

UNIVERSITY OF SHEFFIELD EXAMINATIONS, JUNE, 1939.

Final Honours School of Classics, Class II, Div. I.-A. A. White.

Final Honours School of Architecture, Class II, Div. I.­ R. B. Wragg.

Intermediate B.A. , Div. I.-L. B. Denham. Div. II.¬C. E. Shooter.

Intermediate Examination for Honours School of Architecture.­ G. H. Cotton.

Professional Practice Examination for R.I. B.A.-R. B. Wragg.

Diploma in Education. Howard Robinson.

Diploma in Public Administration.-D. Memmott.

Second Examination (Part I) for M.B., Ch.B.-A. P. Hayhurst, P. E. H. Howarth.

First Examination for M.B., Ch.B.-J. P. E. Balbirnie, J. M. Fulford, H. Hardy.

First Examination for B.D.S.-E. W. Bradford.

First Examination for L.D.S.-G. Turner.

Pre-registration Examination.-W. M. Flint.

Final LL.B., Honours.-M. H. Taylor.

Intermediate LL.B.-D. K. Griffith, G. R. Howson.

Intermediate B.Eng. Div. II.-E. Biggin.

Intermediate B.Eng. (Ordinance 60).-A. Gordon.

Associateship in Engineering.-G. E. Gray, G. C. Watson.

Ph.D., Faculty of Metallurgy. G. A. Geach, L. Mullins.

Intermediate B.Met., Div IL-P. W. Marrison, W. Sorby.

M.A. E. Crabtree.

Imperial Chemical Industries Prize.-N. Siddall.

Laverick Prize.-N. Siddall.

Oxford Letter.

The Queen's College, Oxford.

Dear Sir,

When I was at School, Oxford Letters puzzled me. They always worked to formula. First came the conventional catalogue of adolescent eccentricities : this was usually a sort of personal broadsheet which nevertheless aimed at illustrating the Bohemian life of erstwhile schoolboys among the dreaming spires. Then came some second-hand philosophy with used epigrams and borrowed wit. Here again, the sudden emancipation of our Oxford worthies from School routine was emphasised. The reader often wondered whether Oxford Letters were supposed to be informative, condescending, or even apologetic.

Time and the threat of Schools have blunted my early enthusiasm for penning such a letter myself. Beer, pipes, private jests and exotic hobbies known to cynics as " Fresher's Delight " all these must the writer reject, contenting himself the while with some account of Oxford and undergraduates and begging to be forgiven for any consequent dullness in his letter.

There are many Edwardians in Oxford. They abound in Town and University. Many excel in athletics. Others gain academic distinction. Some are to be seen punting gracefully on the Cherwell or fleeing from the Proctor's Bullers. Others are glittering escorts at Commems. A few inveigh in the Union. A minority, mute and inglorious, it is true, still lurk in garrets or seek refuge from the world in the co-educational " Labour " club. But National Service, on the other hand, had claimed the attention of most : witness the growing numbers of those who daily drill with evil-looking Brens at Manor Road. One might safely say that never before have there been so many Edwardians in Oxford. Certainly Edwardians have never been so much to the fore as at present, both in academic, athletic and social activities.

Of individuals, many names come to my mind. Mathematical honours continue to heap upon Messrs. Camm, Thornhill and Allen. Sachse and Bolsover tread the path of chirurgeonly fame. In the Union, Blake made one of this term's best maiden speeches, while Beard, a regular listener to the debates, suggests a future diplomatic correspondent. Oxford Sport and the Colonial Club lose a prominent figure at the end of this term, when Peter Youens leaves for Sierra Leone.

Walking through Oxford streets you see many Edwardians : Maude, self-appointed patriarch of Balliol, or Gadsby, looking most paternal, in the Broad ; you may even glimpse Oriel's hearty Crookes, or rotund Simon of Magdalen, pacing along the High, while Ken Chare, when he is not playing cricket, lords Oxford from the steps of Queen's.

Of Oxford itself, I could write a lot. Suffice it to say that, in spite of crisis and anxiety, all remains the same. The longer you are up at Oxford, the more in love with the place you become.

Some malcontent recently described Oxford as an " organised waste of time." The only reply to such a piece of nonsense is that the undergraduate is himself to blame if he fails to benefit from the life of the University. To the man who is neither hermit nor wastrel, Oxford has everything to offer. It is not to the maligned and commercialised Oxford, but to the Oxford of fine buildings, good company and undying culture that we at Oxford today welcome all future undergraduates from our School.

I am,

Yours sincerely,

Guy CHESHAM.

Old Edwardians Football Club.

THE Annual General Meeting of the Old Edwardians Football Club was held in the School Library on July 11th, 1939. Officers were elected and the Treasurer's Report revealed that the club was in a sound financial position.

It was with great pleasure that we welcomed Dr. A. W. Barton as our new President and we know that in him we have an active and enthusiastic member. With his knowledge and experience behind us the club must benefit.

With regard to next season's prospects, we have to report that we have suffered the loss of two of our oldest members in H. E. Pearson and J. C. Hawkswell and this, along with the temporary loss of various members occasioned by the new Military Training Bill, will necessitate an extra effort on the part of the remaining members. However, notwithstanding the above, we hope to have our usual satisfactory season.

Last season the 1st XI finished sixth in the " A " Division of the South Yorkshire Amateur League, the 2nd XI being tenth in the " B " Division, the full details being as follows          

1st XI

Played

Won

Lost

Drawn

For

Agst.

Points

24

10

9

5

83

70

25

2nd XI

22

7

15

0

44

102

14

As usual we conclude by offering an invitation to all boys interested in football who are leaving School to join the club.

C. T.

The Library.

THE Library has had a fairly successful term, though there has been a decrease in the number of books issued, there being a heavy drop coincident with the change in the times of school dinner. We hope that next term those who have deserted us will return and give us greater encouragement for the future. In case there are any in the school who, because of recent years they have not used the library, still believe that all its books are out of date, we would point out that we have removed many of the more ancient works, and a number of new books have been purchased. We still have, however, many gaps on the shelves, which we invite those who are leaving to help us to fill ; in addition to books on specialised subjects, we particularly require modern fiction, for this section suffers most from our lack of funds.

G. S. H.

CLASSICS.

This Term the resources of the Classical Library have been swelled by a splendid gift from Mr. Hunter, who, on leaving, has bequeathed us a large number of his own volumes. These include a complete Grote's History of Greece, Jewett's translations of Plato's Dialogues, and Jebb's editions of Sophocles's plays, as well as a second Corpus Poetarum Latinorum. These are already indexed and shelved. A farewell to Mr. Hunter will be found elsewhere, but I should like to take this opportunity of acknowledging on behalf of past and present members of the Classical Sixth our appreciation of his work with us, and of extending to him our best wishes for his future retirement.

About the Classical Library itself there is little to add. A conspicuous gap in the texts has been filled by the acquisition of a complete Thucydides. The general appeal to Old Boys to return Library books has resulted in the re-appearance of half a dozen volumes after a year's absence at Oxford University. We regret that the Library does not seem to find patrons below the Sixth Form, and we encourage members of the Transitus and Middle School to make more use of it in the coining year.

B. M.


Orchestra Notes.

THIS Term has been one of the most eventful in the Orchestra's history. We entered for three classes in the London com­petition instead of two as last year, and fully justified our adventurous spirit.

In the first place, we would like to thank the Headmaster and Mrs. Barton very cordially for the great interest they have shown in our activities throughout the Term, and for the very handsome Orchestral Tea which was held the Thursday after our return from London. Such enthusiasm gives us renewed confidence in the prospects for future expansion, both numerically and musically.

On Saturday, May 6th, the Orchestra went to Leeds and played Holst's Marching Song in the non-competitive Festival there. As this was to be our choice in the non-competitive class in London, we had the great advantage of criticism before playing it in the Queen's Hall. Our adjudicator was Mr. W. H. Reed, well known as a violinist and as a composer, and one who provided an extraordinarily sticky piece for sight-reading in London. We also played Elgar's Pomp and Circumstance March No. 4 en masse with other orchestras, under the baton of the adjudicator, a close personal friend of Elgar's. This was a most interesting experience. We acquitted ourselves well on the whole, and gained valuable experience in playing in a large concert hall.

The climax of the year's Orchestral activities came on Saturday ,June 10th, when we played the Holst non-competitively, and, in the competitive section, the finale of Haydn's London Symphony. Earlier in the afternoon, we had been confronted by W. H. Reed's Patrol in the sight-reading test a very good test-piece, in that about three quarters of it was piano and very exposed. We were very gratified to hear the result, namely, that we had been placed third out of five, and had had the satisfaction of beating one of our old rivals.

In the Haydn we were again placed third, with Beckenham and Westminster occupying their usual places. Perhaps our perform­ance is best summed up by the adjudicator's opening word, " Capital." In the Holst, too, which was a great improvement on our Leeds performance, he had some nice things to say about us-especially the brass, which he congratulated on their having tempered " strength " with " mercy." The criticisms lie made of our performance were not for faults resulting from lack of musician­ship, which cannot be remedied, but from lack of technique, which can be remedied by practice. Our rivals' orchestral activities are part of their curriculum, whereas ours are an out-of-school activity. This was the best performance we have given in London ; a con­firmation of the expansion of the Orchestra which was evident at the last Concert.

We welcome F. C. Snowdon, whose clashes lent new colour to " God Save the King " on Speech Day.

This Term the Orchestra loses one of its most enthusiastic and useful members, Mr. Thomas. His influence on the wood-wind department extended far beyond the musicianship which he put into his own part. We wish him every success in his new post. At the same time, his departure lends added force to the plea for more wood-wind, which has been expressed before in this article. Mr. Baylis is always ready to discuss this question, and anybody who would like to learn an instrument should not hesitate to see him.

D. M. J.

The Gramophone Club.

THIS Term the Club has for the most part devoted its energies .l to the playing of some lesser-known works of the past hundred years.

The first meeting was held on Tuesday, May 2nd, and the work performed was Brahms' Second String Sextet---a piece of music unique for its limpidity and delicacy of touch, varied by passages full of rhythmic " titan " and broad, jovial humour.

The next item on our programme was Mozart's " Jupiter " Symphony ; the fact that Beckenham had chosen it to play at the London Festival, and that our Orchestra were going to practise the finale, lent added interest. Though familiar it has been per­formed at the City Hall twice in the past three years-it never loses its appeal, and has established itself as a favourite amongst us.

On Tuesday, June 13th, we listened to a performance of Dvorak's `Cello Concerto by Casals and the Prague Philharmonic Orchestra. This work, written when the composer was in America, is always a great favourite on a first hearing : the never-ceasing flow of melody, the beautiful tone-colour effects obtained by combining the 'cello and the wood-wind-these make an instant appeal to the listener. The melodies have the same strong negro flavour as those of the New World." !

This Term's meetings concluded with a performance of Sibelius' grim, austere, First Symphony. The sonority and thrilling climaxes of this work send the blood coursing in the veins, as was shown by the spontaneous vocal demonstration that this work aroused when performed at the City Hall a few years ago.

Next Term we hope to begin by playing Smetana's portrayals in music of some of the most famous landmarks of his country, Bohemia.

D. M. J.

House Notes.

ARUNDEL­

We have again had quite a satisfactory term. In the Cricket League we stand third, and in the Swimming Sports we were placed fourth. Coldwell has been a keen Swimming Captain. The Cricket Knock-Out was ended in the first round by an unexpected victory by Lynwood after we were leading on the first innings.

It is the younger members of the House who have been doing well, (although the 1st Xl have now three successive victories to their credit over Chatsworth, Sherwood and Welbeck), and we congratulate the 2nd and 3rd House XI's on their season.

We are looking forward to a successful term next September as very few of the members of the House are leaving. To those who are we tender our best wishes.

CHATSWORTH­

Since the last notes were written, the Athletic Sports have been held ; the results were very satisfactory, particularly in the relay events, in which the open team came second to a strong Clumber four, and the Under Fourteen team ran well and finished third. We also succeeded in winning the Open Tug-of-War for the second year in succession.

The Cricket 1st XI started rather shakily this term, but put up better performances in the later matches. Congratulations to Allsop and Stamp on playing for the School. The second eleven has had a good season, and offers great hope for the future.

In the Swimming Sports, the House was not outstanding, though those who reached the finals put up good performances, particularly in the Under 14 events. We shall expect them to have even greater success in the coming years.

CLUMBER­

The Cross-Country run at the end of last term saw us finish third in the Over 14 team event and third in the Under 14 team event. We congra­tulate Parsons and Wade who were first and second respectively in the senior event, and Barrett who was fourth in the junior event.

In the Sports, Parsons won all the track events and well deserves to be champion athlete. We congratulate and sympathise with Chapman who won the High jump, but missed the record by a quarter of an inch.

We have not fared very well at Cricket this term and we were beaten in the Knock-Out by a strong Welbeck. We congratulate Hutton (an efficient cricket captain) and Gunter on being selected to play for the 1st XI and Brawley for his steady bowling for the 2nd XI.

After a bad start, the Water Polo team finished fifth in the league and we were also placed fifth in the House Swimming Championship. We congratulate Okell on winning the open breast stroke event and on being an efficient swimming captain.

LYNWOOD­

Though depleted by injuries to Rhodes and Bagnall which kept them out of House Teams throughout the whole terns, we have none the less had a fairly successful season. In the Knock-Out Competition we defeated a formidable Arundel team by two runs in an exciting game.

In the semi-final the House put up a courageous show against the re­doubtable Welbeck, but the fates decreed that we should be eliminated. In the league Competition we have been very successful. At the time of writing we have already won the Competition though we have still one match to play. The success is due to excellent team work and genuine House spirit. The 1st XI is unbeaten, and the 2nd Xl have only lost one very close match. The whole team, particularly D. Knight for his splendid performances with the bat, is to be congratulated.

In Swimming we have fared indifferently. We have finished fourth in the competition after nearly having the distinction of beating Sherwood. In the Swimming Sports, though we did not win any trophies, we may safely say that we have recovered from the slump in the House Swimming occasioned by the departure of Taylor and Flint. We congratulate Lipton upon winning a style swimming event. The House Fives is having a lean time ; great difficulty was experienced in raising an Under 14 team. It is sincerely hoped, however, that boys in the Lower School will take a keener interest in the game. Anyone who wishes to learn should see Upton in the Prefects' Room.

This term we say farewell to H. F. Guite, who has been Head of the House in the past year. We shall remember his efficient leadership and his kindness to the younger members of the House. We wish him every success at Cambridge. We also wish success to J. H. D. Corner, who has been captain of Swimming, and to J. H. M. Fisher, who has done stout work for the Cricket Xl.

WENTWORTH­

-'This term has been very successful and encouraging for the House. We must congratulate M. Parkin on the good work lie has done for the House Swimming to enable us to win the House Swimming Champion­ship ; G. H. Foggitt on being joint Swimming Champion, and all other members of the House who have helped in the swimming. The House Water Polo team has played very well under the inspiring captaincy of M. Parkin to win the new cup for the competition. The swimming of the younger members of the House has been very encouraging too : Leeson, J. H., who has been in the School Relay team, and Stones L. C. deserve special mention.

Although the house has not been very successful in the Cricket this term the matches have shown that there are many promising cricketers in the House. The results of the Fives Competition have not been decided yet and so will be reported in next term's Magazine.

To those members of the House who are leaving this term we offer our very best wishes.

HADDON­

The only successful result in the sphere of sport this term has been the winning of the Knock-Out Competition. In the 1st Round we beat Wentworth, last year's winners, fairly comfortably, but the game against Sherwood in the semi-final was a struggle the whole way. We managed to win, however, when the last men were together. Thus we met Welbeck in the Final.

Welbeck batted first and on a rather wet wicket were all out for 62. However, although we were 19 for 1 wicket, they soon had ,5 of our wickets down for 25 runs. At this critical point of the game Holmes went in, and, playing a grand innings of 29 not out, ably helped by Howard,

enabled Haddon to beat Welbeck by 2 wickets. Holmes's innings was a real pleasure to watch ; he rarely played a faulty stroke and the way in which he kept his partner away from the bowling as much as possible was one of the prominent features of our win.

The League teams have not emulated the Knock-Out team by winning their Championship, nevertheless they are 3rd in the League-Table. Hearty congratulations to Holmes, S.H., on being awarded his 1st XI Cricket Colours and to Phillips, R., on gaining his 2nd XI Cricket Colours. As has been remarked before in these House Notes, little need be said, to use a tactful negative, of the House Swimming, Water-Polo, and Fives, The future of Haddon Fives is very black indeed unless several members of the House take the game up seriously. Anyone who wishes to learn to play Fives should apply at the Prefects' Room.

Term-end Puzzles.

1. A CROSS-SECTION.

Cut - across the corner of a cube and a triangular section is obtained. How would you cut a cube so as to obtain a flat section that is a regular hexagon ?

2. BOOTS.

On a certain island there are 1,000 inhabitants. Some of these have only one leg, and half the remainder have no legs at all. How many boots are required by the whole population

3. INVERSIONS THAT AREN'T.

A mirror is laid flat on a table face upwards, and printed letters stand vertically on it. Some of these appear, of course, unreversed, such as C, D, B, etc. How many words of five or more letters can you find which placed in this way on the mirror would appear unreversed ?

 

 

 

Notices.

Contributions for THE MAGAZINE should be addressed to THE EDITOR, SCHOOL MAGAZINE, K.E.S. A box will also be found in the School Library into which all communications may be put.

All Contributions should be written clearly in ink, on one side of the paper only, with an ample margin on the left-hand side. It is a convenience if the number of words in an article be stated at the top of the first page.

The Editor will be glad to be kept informed of the doings of O.E's - especially those in distant parts of the world-in order that Ti,; MAGAZINE may form a link between them and the School.

THE MAGAZINE can be supplied to any other than present members of the School at 6d. per copy, or for a subscription of 1/6 a year, post free.

OLD EDWARDIANS' ASSOCIATION.-Hon. Secretary, G. A. BOLSOVER, 70, Queen Street, Sheffield.

O.E. FOOTBALL CLUB-All boys leaving School who wish to join should communicate with the Hon. Secretary, E. `V. Sivil, 39, Canterbury Avenue. Sheffield, 10.

O.E. CRICKET CLUB.-Hon. Secretary, R. G. BEARD, 4.5, Bank Street, Sheffield, 1.

 

PHOTOGRAPHS by P. M. Booth
Above : The Post du Gard
Below : Boats on the Mediterranean.
see page 104