J. K. MICHELL, M C., M A.

King Edward VII School Magazine.

VOL. IX]
March, 1937
[No. 8.

Editors:
E. MARSH, C. W. FLETCHER.

Hon. Sec.:
Mr. E. F. WATLING.

CONTENTS.

 

Editorial           

322

Public Misery Number One

339

John King Michell

323

Defensive Armaments   ..

342

Wesley College Centenary ..

326

To a Fair But Foolish Maiden

343

The Concert

327

The Natural History Society

343

"Hamlet"

330

Football

344

Arctic Exploration ..

332

Old Edwardians

356

Christianity in China

333

An O.E. in Rhodesia.

357

The Oxford Group ..

336

Old Edwardians' Cricket Club

358

Holiday Competition No. 2

338

Notices

359

Editorial.

SINCE two terms ago our predecessors, Nagle and Larder, made an appeal for more and better contributions, the attitude of the School as a whole towards the magazine has not changed.

We often receive complaints that there is too much recording work included ; on the other hand the people whom the records concern are extremely annoyed if we even suggest that they should be shortened. Consequently we have to try to strike the happy medium by keeping the recording work as complete as possible and at the same time increasing the literary content. But this is not as easy as it seems.

To look at the boys of King Edward VII School playing on the asphalt, one gets the impression that they have not a single inhibition in the world. But put pens in their hands, and say to them " The Magazine needs poems, articles, and short stories!" - and what a startling change ! The boys who have been yelling at the top of their voices out of sheer joy in self-expression now become shy and retiring, and shame-facedly mumble excuses. This is what we Editors have to cope with. How can we increase the literary value of the Magazine if all our budding geniuses are content to hide their lights under bushels ?

Well, you literary aspirants, now comes your big opportunity. It is proposed that to celebrate the centenary of Wesley College the Magazine shall produce an extra edition at the beginning of next term. Whether you get an extra edition or not depends entirely upon you. We cannot produce a magazine without material, so if you do not wish our failure to produce an extra edition to go down in the annals of the school to your everlasting shame, set to work at once.

We welcome to the Staff, in place of Mr. Simm, Mr. G. J. Cumming, an Old Edwardian ; and in place of Mr. Carritt, Mr. J. Wilkinson.

Also Mr. H. A. Bradley, who now occupies the place which was temporarily filled last term by Mr. Lister.

Congratulations to E. F. Good on his Open Scholarship of £100 a year for three years at Caius College, Cambridge.

JOHN KING MICHELL.

IN September, 1933, he first came to us as a substitute for Mr. Green, whom a serious illness had taken from us, and when in the following year it became clear that Mr. Green could not return, the temporary appointment became a permanent one, and the School gained a new friend. But already he had found more than one place here which he could fill to his own delight and to the benefit and enjoyment of us all-not with an easy mastery of many arts, but with painstaking and dogged care lightened with happy enthusiasm. He taught French and German in the Upper School, coached the Second Cricket XI, led the second violins in the Orchestra, taught us how to sing German songs, and took part in Staff Plays and in the School's first attempt at Gilbert and Sullivan in Trial by Jury. In April, 1936, he married Miss Lucy Turner, who then retired from fourteen years' service in the Junior School. The hope that this partnership would bind both these valued friends more closely to the School for many years to come was cut short by the illness that overtook Mr. Michell a few months after their marriage and ended in his death on 16th January, 1937.

The funeral took place at Bradfield and was attended by a large number of the Staff and School. Mr. Hickox was the organist and the School Choir led the singing. The following address, written by the Headmaster, who was prevented by illness from attending, was read by Mr. George A. Bolsover, Secretary of the Old Boys' Association:­

" John King Michell was the last man to have wished that a long address should be given about his qualities and virtues at this time. But it is right that a few words should be said to draw together our knowledge of him and to complete, for those who knew him only on one side, a picture at least in outline of his life and character.

Let us think of him first as a bright and very attractive boy at Plymouth College from 1906, when he was 10 years old, to 1914. Strangely enough he had even then, though none felt it to be significant, a close connection with our School. When he had been there two years, the Rev. H. J. Chaytor moved from the Second Mastership here to be his Headmaster there, and when Michell reached the Sixth, he was prepared for University Scholarships by H. Truelove, an Old Boy of ours fresh from the University, whom Mr. Chaytor had taught here.

He was a keen, wiry lad, of small stature, bright eye, kindly nature and brilliant promise, younger than he looked, very happy when he was happy, as he usually seems to have been, and much cast down on the rare occasions when disappointment came his way. He played games, especially Cricket, very well, and in his last winter (it was the last winter of a now-vanished world as well as of his school days) he fulfilled the good expectations of home and school by winning an Open Exhibition in Modern Languages at St. John's College, Oxford. I have often wondered how much or how little that success meant to him in the terrible four years that followed. He fought through the whole War. He was gazetted a Second Lieutenant in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment in August, 1915, and he transferred to the Machine Gun Corps with that rank in January, 1916. On the 25th of August the Gazette announced that he was awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry in action. He repulsed with his Section a counter attack by the enemy, and, as the official account says, caused about eighty of them to drop their bombs and surrender. Unofficial accounts add a picture of a very small man with a very large voice and a sense of humour which even then did not desert him, shouting orders in fluent and life-like German down the entry to a dug-out, and ordering up without their arms a force much larger than his own. The official report also says that he did fine work rescuing wounded.

He shortly received promotion to be Lieutenant and Acting­Captain, and on 3rd October, 1918, he won a bar to his Military Cross ` for conspicuous gallantry and fine leadership.' This time he ' made a forward personal reconnaissance under very heavy shell fire, handled his Command with great skill and determination, and got very quickly into action.'

This magnificent record of gallantry was to him only the surface of the War. He was always a sensitive person, and essentially kind and considerate. How great inroads on his nervous and physical wellbeing were made by those years only his last illness proved. Physically he suffered from the after-effects of two different kinds of gas. Some of you will know that he bore half that burden voluntarily and as a result of a singular, but for him quite characteristic, act of selfless kindness to one whose need he thought was greater than his own. He found that a married man next to him had a leaking gas-mask : and he took that mask in exchange for his own effective one. The gas destroyed one of his lungs. In a less obvious way the sub-conscious strain of the War on his nerves made his succeeding life a continual battle. Even when he did not know it, that enemy was always with him, and in his long and for many years victorious struggle against it, he fought with the same gallantry that he had shown in the War.

The veteran, with these scars outward and inward upon him, who went at last to take up that award at St. John's College, Oxford, must have been a very different person from the bright and hopeful boy who won it in 1914. He took a War Degree, and then came 10th in the examination for the Indian Civil Service, showing that his scholarship at any rate was unaffected.

At this point, however, circumstances turned him towards teaching. In the years that followed, grave difficulties and a long struggle with both financial and personal problems afflicted him, and would have put down many a man of less brave spirit. He was too unselfish, too quixotically chivalrous, for the post-war world, and for a time after the War the sub-conscious effects of which I have spoken were sometimes too much for his wisdom. So that he prepared himself a stony path. But he did walk it with courage and in the end with a success which taught those who knew him well a lesson both in the indomitable spirit of man and in the goodness and forgiveness of God.

It was typical of him that in the midst of it all, with an interval of eleven years from his University days, he decided to improve his qualifications, and took an External Degree of London University, with First Class Honours in Modern Languages. His intellectual alertness and his first-rate scholarship, especially in the French tongue, are well known to many of you.

Such was the background of the man we knew. We shall always think of him as he was, particularly in the days of his engagement and marriage to one whom we all know and value, finding new joys of a quiet but permanent kind in life, keen on the School and loyal to it, enjoying all his various activities, including walks in that wild country, lovely in its bleakness, in which his body will finally rest. We shall think of his taut and vigorous bearing, especially in the classroom, his moments of enthusiasm, his help at Whiteley Woods, and, above all, his very vivid enjoyment in the musical and dramatic performances at which he so much excelled. We know that his excellences were built on a solid foundation of inward goodness. If he did not talk much to any or to most of us about religion, yet he had pre-eminently that soul which the Early Church felt to be both a problem and a challenge, the soul that was Christian by nature rather than by conversion and profession. No other soul could have borne, as he bore, with kindness and patience and fortitude, the long sufferings of the last five months, when both the strained nerves and the weakened body assailed but could not embitter his spirit. For such courage, for such natural goodness, let us all give thanks to God who gave them, and for the peace too that is now upon him."

Wesley College Centenary

The following is the draft of a letter which will shortly be circulated to Old Boys of Wesley College, over a number of influential signatures :­

Dear Sir,

You will probably remember that Wesley College looked back to 1837 as the year of its foundation. The Centenary, therefore, falls to be celebrated this year, and it is our earnest desire, as no doubt it will be of all Old Boys, that some suitable memorial of the foundation of the College should be made to mark the occasion.

The exterior of the old building, with the Close in front of it, has been handed on to King Edward VII School, and the nobility of its architecture is still, as it was in our day, an inspiration to the young. We believe that the School recognises its debt in this to Wesley College, and is proud to be regarded as in part the successor of our School.

We should like, however, to take this, perhaps the last, opportunity of perpetuating the name and memory of Wesley College within King Edward VII School. An unofficial, but so far as possible representative, Committee has therefore been formed, and we have decided to issue an appeal to all known Old Boys of the College. We have no idea what financial support we shall receive, and we should make our memorial dependent on the amount that is forthcoming. We have already received promises ranging from one to ten guineas.

At the least we should be able to endow a set of " Wesley College Prizes " for competition by boys of the School. This would be parallel with the already existing Grammar School Classical Prizes and the W. P. Taylor Memorial Mathematical Prizes, and should perhaps be offered for English subjects.

With rather more money we could panel and furnish in a worthy manner the School Library, which could be made a good deal more attractive as a Library than it is at present. With a still greater response we could endow a Scholarship.

We shall hope in any case to have a gathering at the School in celebration of the Centenary some time during the summer.

The Honorary Treasurer of the Appeal Committee is H. R. BRAMLEY, 42, Bank Street, Sheffield, 1, and the Honorary Secretary ARNOLD BRITTAIN, 12, Norfolk Row, Sheffield, 1.

Will you please send to the Honorary Treasurer whatever contribution you think fit and as generous a one as you can suitably send ? And if you have any further suggestions to make, or any help to offer, or if you can furnish any lists of Old Boys (with their addresses) to whom this appeal should go, the Honorary Secretary will be very glad to receive them.

We are sending a copy of this appeal to the Sheffield Press and other papers.

The Concert.

Saturday, 19th December, 1936.

PROGRAMME.

PART I.

GOD SAVE THE KING.

1.

THE AGINCOURT SONG ..

 
 

FORMS IIc and IIn.

 
 

(with orchestral accompaniment).

 

2. PIANOFORTE SOLO

" Nocturne in F sharp major "

Chopin

 

Mr. C. H. FOGGITT.

 

3.

" Minuet and Gavotte "

Lully (1633-1687)

 

THE ORCHESTRA.

 
 

(Solo Violin : KAY, L. R. Solo Clarinet : Mr. E.W. THOMAS).

 

4. CAROLS

 (a) "Coventry Carol"

XV Century Traditional

 

(b) " Shepherds in the fields abiding "

Flemish melody, harmonised by Chas. Wood

 

(c) "Little Town of Bethlehem "

M. Walford Davies

 

OCTET.

 
 

Treble. FRITH, G.; NICOL, D. M.; Alto. GUITE, H. F.; SWALLOW, R. F.

 
 

Tenor. FULFORD, J. M.;  HOPPER, P. H.; LEE, G. G. Bass. SAVILLE, M. V.

 

5.

Quintet for Strings and Piano
 No. 1 in D major.

Pleyel

 

1st Violin : HALL, J. D. 2nd Violin : Mr. C. HELLIWELL.

 
 

Viola : JONES, D. M. 'Cello : Mr. E. H. C. HICKOX. Piano : KAYE, K.

 

6. PART-SONGS

(a) " Linden Lee "

R. Vaughan Williams

 

(b) " Aime-moi bergere

Jacques Lefevre

 

(c) " Huntsman's Chorus"

XVII Century Weber

 

THE CHOIR.

 

7.

TRANSCRIPTION : Aria : " Che faro"..

Gluck (1714-1787)

 

(from the Opera : " Orfeo ")

 
 

THE ORCHESTRA.

 

8. Song

" Shepherd, see thy horse's foaming mane " .

Korbay

 

Mr. W. E. GLISTER.

 

9. Song

" Quittez pasteurs "

arr. by H. G. Ley

 

air and words from " Noels anciens

 
 

FORM IIc

 
 

(with orchestral accompaniment).

 

10.

."Symphony on British Airs" ..

Nicholls

 

For voices, percussion instruments and strings.

 
 

MIDDLE SCHOOL.

 
 

(and string section of the Orchestra).

 
 

PART II.

 

1. PART-SONGS

(a) " King Jesus hath a garden ..

arr. by Chas. Wood

 

(XVII Century Dutch Carol).

 
 

(b) ` Full Fathom Five " ..

Chas. Wood

 

THE CHOIR.

 

2.

" Summer Day's Suite "

E. Coates.

 

No. 1 : " In a Country Lane "

 
 

THE ORCHESTRA.

 

3.

" Sonata in E minor for Violoncello and Piano "

Brahms

 

(1st Movement).

 
 

Mr. R. E. D. LISTER and Mr. E. H. C. HICKOX.

 

4.

" Quid pro Quo," or "The Shooting Party" . .

 
 

(A little foul play in one Act).

 
 

Words by E. F. WATLING.

Music by P. L.BAYLIS.

 

Characters

 
 

Sir Edward Blobb, a millionaire

Mr. E. F.WATLING.

 

Parker, his butler

Mr. W. E.GLISTER.

 

Arthur Meek, a gentleman .

Mr. K. S.McKAY.

5. CAROL

" Good King Wenceslas "

Traditional

 

SCHOOL AND AUDIENCE.

 

6.

" Reveille "

 

The Concert is the fitting conclusion to the Autumn Term, but at the price of allowing its programme to he regulated by tradition and of providing the audience with the familiar entertainment it expects. In recent years, however, the spirit of enterprise has been increasingly evident in the School's musical activities. The Orchestra was formed and has developed within the last decade. At first admitted only on sufferance, it now dominates the programme and justifies this distinction by its recent considerable improvement in technique, especially in the tone and body of the strings. The pioneers who tackled Eric Coates' Summer Days Suite should be proud both of themselves and of their successors who revived this same piece after long and dusty neglect. The Staff is now well represented in the Orchestra and provides the essential continuity. In addition to his enthusiasm at rehearsals and in the School at large, one may guess at indefatigable propaganda on the part of Mr. Baylis in the privacy of the Common Room. The old vice of talking during orchestral items, though much abated, still persists. The explanation is no doubt that most people like to watch as well as hear their music and that, owing to the shape of the Hall, the Orchestra as a whole is invisible to a large section of the audience.

The development of the Orchestra has had its choral counterpart in the formation of the Octet and the Choir under Mr. Wheeler. Despite the problems of key and balance which loom large in school part-singing, the Octet sang its three unaccompanied carols most effectively and the Choir contrasted their quieter songs with Weber's Huntsman's Chorus, in which the tenors attained almost virtuoso standard with their repeated " Follow Hark." Increase of group items has tended to crowd out the soloist, at the same time raising the level of performance expected. The soloists obviously bad that comfortable feeling of being quite prepared to meet the audience and acquitted themselves accordingly. Mr. Glister especially conveyed all the chill ferocity implicit in his song.

Most traditional of all the elements of the Concert is the form or group song, with its elaborate platform-technique. Entrances and exits must be swift and orderly ; stragglers ruin the whole effect. Knees must be clean, stockings tidy and hair well brushed. Eyes must be glued to the baton and not allowed to wander. Tradition also dictates that one of the songs should be of historical interest (this year, instead of Sumer is icumen in, John Dunstable's Agincourt Song was sung), and at least one in French. This latter condition is most important, since the French song yields second place in impressiveness only to the Latin Address on Speech Day. To keep abreast with the times, a school must have its Percussion Band. Platform-technique was developed to the utmost in the Symphony on British Airs, for voices, percussion instruments and strings. The whole of the Middle School was involved. First, the singers entered, rank upon rank, then the musicians, bearing instru­ments of the type usually found in Christmas stockings. Even that most elementary of instruments, the kazoo or musical sub­marine, was represented. An initial roll and crash, and they were off, exploiting all manner of subtle and downright rhythms, with drum, tambourine, cymbal, " knick-knacks " and sleigh-bells. All this demanded rigid concentration on the baton. A medieval " Jack o' the Clock " could not have tapped or rattled with any greater precision, nor those gilded figures who, posed along the facade of a Mammoth Fair Organ, turn their heads and strike their gongs in time with the martial music. The applause after the final flourish delayed the interval stampede to the Dining Hall.

The audience has come to expect a musical play as the concluding item of the Concert. Faced no doubt with the difficulty of procuring a suitable operetta, Mr. Watling and Mr. Baylis had the happy idea of writing one themselves, and seasoned melodrama delicately with burlesque. Mr. Watling's verses were as pithy and as apt as ever, whilst Mr. Baylis' music was appropriately sentimental or sly, stirring or sinister as occasion required. Mr. Watling was the millionaire with a taste for lurid crime fiction, Mr. Glister the conservatively-minded butler with a taste for his master's spirits, and Mr. McKay the plausible rogue who threatens them both, a revolver in each fist. This tense situation is unexpectedly resolved by the discovery that millionaire and crook were at the same school-Spode. They indulge in sentimental reminiscence. The millionaire confesses that from Spode he went to Oxford, and, by means better left unspecified, amassed a fortune. The other went to Cambridge and became a thief. This revelation aroused audible mirth among the Oxford sympathisers in the audience. Their glee was premature, for the other culture triumphs in the end. Millionaires are becoming rarer, and gangsters more numerous and more romantic. Infatuated by the glamour which surrounds Arthur Meek, gentleman, Sir Edward is no longer satisfied by mere fiction and hand in hand with butler and crook, dances joyfully away to lead an active life of crime. This same theme of faring forth into the outer world was reiterated in the communal singing of Good King Wenceslas-page and monarch forth they went-and in Reveille-clay lies still, but blood's a rover. Thus inspired, the audience itself departed, well content with the evening's entertainment.

G. N. R.

"Hamlet."

January 15th and 16th, 1937.

CAST.

Francisco

R. SCHOLEY

Bernardo

N. J. BRAMAH

Horatio

M. V. SAVILLE

Marcellus

F. B. INMAN

The Ghost of Hamlet's Father

H. HARDY

Hamlet

G. D. BOLSOVER

Claudius

J. B. HARRISON

Gertrude

A. B. D. JENKINS

Polonius

E. B. LOVE

Laertes

G. R. HOWSON

Ophelia

W. E. WIGLEY

Reynaldo

A. N, BLACKHURST

Rosencrantz

G. S. F. GILL

Guildenstern

P. RHODES

A Player .

J. H. P. UPTON

A Second Player

G. D. BAKER

A Third Player

R. SCHOLEY

Fortinbras, Prince of Norway

N. J. BRAMAH

A Norwegian Captain ..

R. C. MOFFAT

A Gravedigger

R. C. MOFFAT

A Second Gravedigger

J. G. C. EARL

A Priest

H. HARDY

Osric, a courtier

A. N. BLACKHURST

An Attendant

O. B. MORTIMER

 IF the School Play is to be one of Shakespeare's there are the best of reasons for its being his best play rather than his worst. One or two wiseacres shook their heads when Hamlet was suggested, yet this year's play was generally voted to be one of the most enjoyable that the Dramatic Society has given. Shakespeare is not difficult to stage. A number of us recently saw-along with the lions--a performance of Julius Caesar on the ` unworthy scaffold " of the City Hall. The school stage, or lack of stage, is a legacy of an unfortunate past, but it was no obstacle to the satisfactory presentation of Hamlet, especially with Mr. Watling's skill and experience to make the most of it.

Oddly enough, the youth of the actors seemed to me to result in a performance which stressed what was probably the essence of the play in the minds of the bulk of the Elizabethan audience ; it was above all the struggle between the usurper Claudius and Hamlet, with the scales heavily weighted against Hamlet by the traits which, while they make him the worse politician, win the sympathy of the audience for the man.

The time is out of joint ; O cursed spite
That ever I was born to set it right ?

One is reminded of Earl Grey, by all accounts a man of charming personality, hating politics, feeling miserable and out of place in public life, disliking war, loathing much of the boasted civilisation of his time, yet unable to escape from his sense of duty, and burdened with some part of the responsibility for the drift into war. He is said to have cherished " a coward hope " that he might be released from politics. Hamlet, too, has his coward hope, but the conviction that it would be unforgivable cowardice by all his standards to abandon the revenge he has sworn to exact drives him on to the resolution of the conflict in his and Claudius's deaths. He was born a prince, a Tudor prince, and from that prison to which Fortune has sent him he cannot get free.

As Hamlet, Bolsover acted intelligently and attractively. While he did not always convey the changing moods of a tortured man in an age less emotionally restrained than ours, he was a Hamlet-unlike some-who we could believe delighted in plays and fencing, sport and learning, poetry and war, welcoming with both hands the new life of his time-Elizabethan not Evangelical in his heart-searchings. He was well supported by Saville (Horatio). Harrison (Claudius) was an effective contrast ; his villainy was suitably restrained and practical. Love (Polonius) also did well. Howson (Laertes) was not so good, and something was lost in the final scenes by his failure to make the most of his part. Hardy was a dignified ghost, speaking his lines well in spite of the handicap of a mask. Jenkins also spoke well as the Queen, though with an unvarying melancholy. Wigley (Ophelia) looked most attractive and triumphed in madness as Ophelia always does. Moffat also deserves praise for his rendering of a Yorkshire gravedigger, given with gusto. I found nothing to object to in the presence of his accent in Shakespeare's Denmark, and I am still ready to maintain Moffat's cause against his detractors.

The minor characters were for the most part satisfactorily done, and the costumes and lighting were good. Now we have made a start on tragedy may I suggest Macbeth and Julius Caesar as possibles for .next time?

W.H.S.

Arctic Exploration.

ON the afternoon of February 5th, the Middle and Upper School assembled in the Hall to hear a very interesting lecture by Mr. Edward Shackleton, son of the famous explorer. He himself has had considerable experience of exploration, and he gave an account of the expedition of the Oxford University Exploration Club to Ellesmere Land, in the Arctic Circle. This expedition was unable to reach its objective through ice holding up the trawler, and so they entered a fiord in Greenland, where their main base was promptly established. Here the members of the expedition had to undergo what was, perhaps, the most trying part of their journey, namely, four months of complete darkness. Mr. Shackleton gave us an amusing description of how Christmas Day was celebrated under these conditions. As spring approached the main work of the expedition was quickly begun. Three parties set out over the ice to explore Ellesmere Land, where considerable collections were made both of data and specimens. The most notable discovery was a new range of mountains in the north of Ellesmere Land. The southern party also came into contact with the Eskimos, and found them very hospitable, particularly the small boy who attached him­self to the expedition. Mr. Shackleton threw considerable light on the character of the Eskimos. They are very kind and friendly, and show extreme patience. Anyone who loses his temper is considered mad, and is dropped down a hole in the ice. The con­ditions of their land are very healthy. The air is cold, but there is no dirt and consequently no germs. After living in this germ-free atmosphere, said Mr. Shackleton, most of the members of the expedition caught influenza on their return to England.

Mr. Shackleton's lecture was accompanied by the display of an excellent collection of lantern slides taken on the expedition. Particularly beautiful were those showing the flowers found in the Arctic Circle. In addition to the lantern slices, several short films were also shown.

Christianity in China.

ON Friday, 26th February, Mr. George Osborn, at home on leave from missionary work in China, kindly consented to give the the Sixth and Transitus an account of the present state of religion in China.

" The chief religions in China are Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism," said Mr. Osborn. Confucianism was not originally a religion but a system of ethics drawn up by Confucius, who was chiefly concerned with the maintenance of a gentlemanly code of conduct. He laid much importance upon the family unit, and found a psychological outlet for the mystical tendencies of the Chinese in the worship of the dead. To this day loyalty to the family is so highly prized in China that it is considered no disgrace for a man to embezzle public funds if the money is to be spent on the family. Hence arises the great difficulty of maintaining an efficient governmental system.

Buddhism was originally an Indian religion which was spread in China by missionaries. It was not the pure religion as taught by Buddha, but was to a large extent despiritualised by ceremonial pomp and ritual. The third religion, Taoism, was a form of animism -the worship of the elemental forces of nature in the shape of animals and plants-and was far more primitive than the others, with its superstition, magic and sorcery. The religions were to a large extent intermingled, for the average Chinaman would act according to the principles of Confucius when in good health : in illness he would send for a Buddhist priest, and would be buried according to the ceremonial of Taoism.

Talking of the Chinese character, Mr. Osborn said that it was difficult to engage a Chinaman in a serious conversation, owing to the strong sense of humour which made the Chinese see the funny side of everything. Another characteristic was patience, which the Chinese called " the Virtue of Young Brides." The young wife had to have a large amount of this virtue, since she was the least important member of the family and was treated as a servant by her mother-in-law and her older sisters-in-law. The Chinese, like the English, felt confident of their superiority to the rest of the nations of the world, and had thus faced the Japanese aggression with equanimity, since they felt sure that the Japanese would soon become absorbed into the Chinese civilisation, as all other conquering nations had been.

But unlike former conquerors, the Japanese scorned the Chinese civilisation, and so the Chinese were beginning to realise that more drastic methods must be used against them. There was a rising tide of Nationalism which would probably result in strong resistance to Japan and might even drive the Japanese from Chinese territory altogether. Many Christians were taking a leading part in this resistance, and Mr. Osborn had noticed that the Christians seemed to have greater tenacity than their non-Christian countrymen. Mr. Osborn then said he would answer questions.

LEE : What classes of Chinamen are converted to Christianity ?

Mr. OSBORN : The upper and middle classes are more often converted.

MAUDE : Why are there fewer converts amongst the poor?

Mr. OSBORN : The poor are so mobile that when one interests them in Christianity they seldom become converted, since the missionary cannot keep in touch with them on their frequent journeys.

GUITE : What is the attitude of the missionaries to armed resistance against the Japanese ?

Mr. OSBORN : At first the missionaries favoured passive resistance and organised the boycott of Japanese goods. But as the situation is becoming more serious, many are advocating armed resistance.

GUITE : Does not this attitude puzzle the Christian Chinaman, since it is contrary to the doctrine of turning the other cheek ?

Mr. OSBORN replied at some length to this, saying that the Chinese were often troubled, as, indeed, we were, upon this point. He was of the opinion that a war against oppression was justified, and many of his Christian converts were volunteering for guerrilla warfare in Manchuria.

MARSH : I understand there is a considerable amount of Americanisation taking place in China. How far is it splitting up the influence of the family ?

Mr. OSBORN : The rich Chinese, and the Chinese who have been to American Universities, naturally do not relish the idea of living in a large communal house with the rest of their relations and the family live-stock, and are building private houses for them­selves. But the family influence is still strong, in the sense that members of one family help one another, and there is a large amount of clannishness.

THE HEADMASTER : Do the Christian missionaries support the family ideal, or do they come into conflict with it ?

Mr. OSBORN : On the whole we try to inculcate the family virtues, but on one point we come into conflict with the family. I refer to the choice of the bride. In Chinese marriages the arrangements are made by the parents of the bride and bridegroom, and the bride's wishes are not consulted. The couple to be married do not meet until the marriage ceremony. Naturally the Christians oppose this callous arrangement, and are attempting to emancipate the Women.

MAUDE : Which branch of Christianity makes the most converts ?

Mr. OSBORN : Roman Catholicism, as it has been established longer in China.

In answer to further questions he said that Christianity had often gained a footing in China and then lost ground again, but he thought that the present increase in Christian converts would be continued. Referring to the Chinese Universities, he said that they were run almost completely by Chinese, with American financial support. Here he was obliged to conclude.

The Oxford Group.

THERE are 700 of you at School. I wonder if more than seven of you have ever even heard of the Oxford Group ? Perhaps one or two of the poets and philosophers of the Sixth have, but to the rest of you, I imagine, the Oxford Group is not even a name. Before I came up to Oxford, the only reference to the Group that I had seen was a passing mention in the School Magazine. This is the state of affairs which I hope this article will alter. For the Oxford Group is one of the biggest things in the World, today. It is far bigger than Sheffield Wednesday and Radio and Don Bradman. You know all about these things because they are advertised. I am writing this article to tell you a little about the Group.

The Oxford Group is not a dramatic society, nor a league of Fascists, nor a tennis club, nor a debating society, nor a Bolshevik plot. It has no organisation, no President, no Secretary, no Treasurer. As a newspaper journalist said

" It's not an institution, and it's not a point of view ;
 It starts a revolution by starting one in you."

This may be doggerel, but it hits it off pretty well. The Oxford Group is simply a group-a group of people (not in Oxford only, but in almost every country of the World) who believe that the cure of human problems lies in human nature. The Oxford Group has, quite definitely and uncompromisingly, a solution to all human problems, personal, national and inter-national. One has only to look at and talk to people in the Group to realise that there is no reasonable doubt that the methods of the Group are extremely effective. But personal contact is necessary to explain these methods, simple though they are. My object here is merely to acquaint you with the existence of the Group ; to point out to you that it is an extremely active and important factor in the World today. The question of " how is it done? " must wait until you have an opportunity to meet the Group personally.

The Oxford Group believes that the selfishness, dishonesty and impurity in each individual one of us is the direct cause of the World's problems-of War, Exploitation, Unemployment, Racial Antagonism. If we Englishmen and those Frenchmen and Germans all continue to be selfish and greedy as individuals, how can we expect the relations between England, France and Germany to be anything else but covetous and distrustful? It is asking a miracle. The solution lies in the human nature of each one of us - of you, and Pierre, and Heinrich, and Hiram. Somehow, we must stop being self-centred, and become unselfish, and honest, and simple. And if we don't-well, the aeroplanes are waiting again.

When I came up to Oxford, I had thought about Atheism, Agnosticism, Pessimism, Socialism and Pelmanism. And all were the same use to me-precisely nil. Naturally, I could not make things succeed where the rest of the World had failed for thousands of years. But when I got up here and met the Group, I saw at once it was just what I wanted-a solution to my personal problems and those of the world. The question of how is this change brought about, must be left until one of the Group comes to see each of you. It is simple, and could be expressed completely in a dozen words, but it needs personal contact to get it across. It is only possible, in print, to illustrate the terrific effect the Group is having, by a few examples.

Arthur Norval, a professor of Pretoria University, and leader of the extreme anti-British faction in South Africa, met the Group. At once, he renounced, in public, all his previous frantic anti­British activities, which had caused such disturbance throughout South Africa. This was the beginning of a new constructive co-operation between Dutch and British in South Africa, and the " Manchester Guardian " reports : " The recent fusion in South Africa is due to the spiritual revival brought about throughout the country by the activities of the Oxford Group."

Mr. Savage, the Prime Minister of New Zealand, announces publicly : " I see in the Oxford Group the only true policy for this country, and I promise all help to Oxford Group pioneers here."

Cecil Abel, of the Oxford Group, goes to Papua, where missionaries have repeatedly failed to put down the practice of head-hunting. The natives suddenly reform, and hold inter-tribal conferences, which would have been quite impossible before the arrival of the Group. The result is the almost complete cessation of head-hunting in Papua.

Dr. H. H. Kung, the Chinese Minister of Finance, says : "The Oxford Group is a movement which transcends geographical divisions, racial distinctions, party differences and class conflicts. I believe the principles and discipline of this movement will help to bind the men and women of the World together in a common moral and spiritual awakening which is urgently needed to evolve a new and better social order.

The Marquess of Salisbury says in the House of Lords : " The cause of the world's state is not economic, but moral. If I may use a phrase which common in a great movement which is taking place at this moment in this country and else-where, what you want are God-guided personalities, which make God-guided nations, to build a new world."

And so it goes on. Everywhere, in every country, creed, and class, people are seeing the same, calm, common-sense of the Group principles, and are putting them into action. News comes in constantly from Denmark, France, Germany, Canada, the United States, New Zealand, China-news of this great Crusade against the moral rot which threatens civilisation.

A. J. R. G.

Holiday Competition No. 2.

A PRIZE-a book value 3s. 6d., to be chosen by the winner--is offered for the best humorous sonnet on " The League of Nations."

Contributions should be written or typed on one side of the paper, and delivered at the School Office in a sealed envelope addressed to the Editor of the Magazine, not later than May 1st, 1937.

Competitors may use a nom-de-plume if they wish ; in that case the competitor's real name must be given in a sealed envelope inside the envelope containing their entry.

The Competition is open to present members of the School only.

RESULT OF COMPETITION No. 1. (See March 1936 issue).

The problem set was evidently too teasing for the School, since not a single effort was received. We are convinced that the only possible solution of the problem is that the wreckage was the result of a rehearsal for an Old Boys' play !

Public Misery Number One.

I LIVE in a Zoo ! No, I am not an inmate-that is an old gag sir. You see, I have the misfortune to possess a younger brother who thinks he is something of an amateur Julian Huxley or Cherry Kearton, or someone, and whose sole object in life is to fill our house with all shapes and sizes of animal (and vegetable) life, at the expense of the other inhabitants. It has always been the same, and, I am afraid, always will be. I can recall with mental agony the unfortunate histories of mice, butterflies, budgerigars, sticklebacks, newts (one got loose in my bedroom-I have ever since suffered from insomnia), goldfish, stick-insects (who show remarkable, but unfortunately unmarketable enthusiasm in matters of egg production), guinea-pigs, rabbits, and about every other form of animal life it is possible to squeeze into a small dwelling. I am telling you all this because I think if you understand the sort of life it is my lot to live, you may be able to sympathise with me when I tell you the story of an unfortunate experience of mine this term.

I always thought our " smooth-haired fox " was the most brainless creature I ever set eyes on-until George arrived. Now I can talk to Peter and feel that he understands every word I say ; he seems intelligence itself. But George-well, you may judge for yourself. When he first arrived soon after Christmas he was a tiny ball of glossy black fur. He sat curled up on the hearth, and only stirred when a cinder fell out on to him, or when he heard the clink of his saucer being filled with milk. Occasionally he would do a little sparring practice with a ball of paper dangling on a string and occasionally he caused an earthquake when he was discovered making a tour of exploration. Peter didn't like him at all at first, and George's nine lives disappeared very quickly.

The first escaped hastily on their first meeting. Number Two fluttered away when he sampled Peter's biscuits. The third disappeared when the kettle up-tipped over him. He lost the fourth when he crawled inside a newspaper lying on the floor, and was trodden on by my eleven stone. He wasted the fifth through curiosity-he trod on a very thin branch at the very top of our silver birch. By now I do not know what to make of him. Officially (that is, if we go by the nine lives theory) he is a ghost. Lives numbers six to nine were lost in the gold-fish bowl, in the oven, under a snowdrift and in the vacuum-cleaner. Since he has been officially dead he has become Public Misery Number One. Having given you this brief character sketch, I will proceed to tell you why I have particular cause to curse him ; you may believe it or not - I am afraid only Mr. X and John can vouch for the truth of my story-but once you have met George, I don't think you will doubt its authenticity.

One morning about a week ago I overslept. Actually that was rather unusual for me, for, as I have already stated, the newt incident ruined my sleeping capabilities. I had to gobble down my breakfast in five minutes, snatch up my case and run all the way to school. I arrived just in time to take off my coat, dump my case in the corridor, and dash into the assembly-hall, beating the Prefects by a short head. Prayers over, I grabbed my case, and, hoping I had all the books I needed, went in for the first period.

When I sat down I opened my case, put in my hand for a book - and hit something hard and warm. Exactly ! I looked in and saw George sitting back on Hydriotaphia, and looking rather dazed and somewhat creased and crumpled. He did nothing else-just sat there and leered at me. In fact, there was nothing else to do he had done it all. Paradise Lost looked as though it might never be regained. Le Grand Siecle didn't look at all grand. My brand new edition of Chaucer looked like the Ellesmere manuscript. Moreover, George must by now have an extensive German voca­bulary-down to " 1," in fact, which seems somehow appropriate !

Experience has taught me that promptitude is called for at such moments. I removed, as quickly as possible, the debris of the literature of France, Germany and England, and, before George had time to grasp the situation, slammed down the lid and fastened the catch. That settled George for the first period, anyhow. At ten o'clock George was transported intact to my locker. I left him pawing the grill and looking decidedly annoyed. It occurred to me that he might by hungry, but he'd have to wait until " break." At any rate, nobody but I knew he was in school, and I reasoned that in the locker he could neither come to nor do any harm.

At 10.45, for the first time in my life, I took my place in the queue and bought a bottle of milk. I dashed upstairs with it, and approached my locker with : " Now, you little    , here's your third-of-a-pint -! " I stopped, I opened the locker. Right again ! Of course, he wasn't there ! I could hardly have expected that. Don't ask me how he got out. I can't offer any explanation. The fact remains,, he wasn't there. I thought he might be hiding in the folds of my coat, but no, not a sign of him ! By this time I had grown used to George's practical, jokes, so,, I wasn't much alarmed. It didn't bother me much if he did get lost.. I met brother John, and was about to tell him, but thought better of it.

The next period was for me a Special Timetable. I knew I was usually the only person in the room on these occasions, and that I was not likely to be disturbed, so I hoped to be able to get some work done-I had done none so far that morning ! Imagine (if you dare) my thoughts when (yes, right again !), five minutes after settling down to Livy, an ominous " meow " sounded through the room. At first I could not see him, but eventually my eye alighted on a black mass sitting on a pile of books in the corner. I thought it high time to put an end to his liberty once again, so I got up and began stalking him gingerly round the room. It didn't strike me as at all amusing then ! I was just leaning over one of the back desks with my hands almost round the cat when the door opened, and in came Mr. X.

"  Are you Special Timetable ? "
"Yes, Sir."
" What do you think you're doing ? "
" I'm looking for something on the floor, Sir."
" Oh, I'm sorry. I should advise you to get on with your work, though."

When the door closed behind him I bent down again. Needless to say, George was not there.

He re-appeared five minutes later-at my elbow. He set up such a persistent howling that I became quite scared lest he should give the show away. Then a happy thought occurred to me. I still had the third-of-a-pint. It was risky, but it might solve the problem. For the sake of something better to put it in, I poured the milk little by little into the pen-groove, and spent an interesting five minutes watching George run his tongue along the groove like a railway engine picking up water.

Unfortunately the move was a bad one. George likes milk, and clamoured for the other two-thirds-of-a-pint. I thought this was becoming too much of a good thing, so into the bag he went. I was just about to put the case on the floor again when the door opened once more, and Mr. X looked in for the second time that period.

" Are you working ? "
" Very busy, Sir,"
" Let me see."

He strode up to my desk ; and George, showing unusual enthusiasm for a tragic situation, began to bounce about in the case (which was still up-ended on the desk), until it swung downwards and outwards on to the floor. I made a grab for it, but was too late. The catch clicked open, the lid was raised, and out sprang George.

Mr. X was quite decent about it. He said something about " letting the cat out of the bag," and told me to take it down to the dining hall. As I went home at dinner-time with George wriggling in my pocket, I contemplated on the best method of getting rid of him. Contemplation is idle. Two hours later George crawled out from beneath a load of coal which had been shot down our cellar grate. As I write he is drying in front of the fire, after being half-drowned in the water-cistern.

I know this story seems futile and rather improbable, but I maintain that truth is stranger than fiction ! Are there any offers for Public Curiosity No. 1-the cat with 99 lives ?

GRAH.

Defensive Armaments.

THE world is making gas-masks,
The world is making guns,
The world is making battleships
Of thirty thousand tons.

The Japs are building cruisers,
The Reds are building tanks,
And Hitler's training little boys
To fill the Nazi ranks.

But Russia has her army
To keep the world at peace,
And England builds her navy
That hate and war may cease.

The Frenchman loves his neighbour,
The Germans wouldn't fight,
And all the mighty armaments
Are built in love of right.

The world must be so charming,
Its people so divine,
To spend so many thousands,
So many pacts to sign,

Because they dread all warfare,
And only wish to seek
The maintenance of justice
Alike for strong and weak.

But far the most ennobled
Are these unselfish Huns,
Who sacrifice their butter
To build the world more guns ;

Not guns to kill the Frenchman,
The Russian or the Jew,
But guns to save the world, Sir !
-And maybe. Eden, too ?         

K. A. C

To a Fair But Foolish Maiden.

SHALL I woo with martial clangour
And the trumpet's brazen strain,
Or shall I with a lotus-langour
Bid thee lull a lover's pain ?

Shall I offer golden treasure,
Orient pearls in silver set,
Fire-shot opals for thy pleasure,
Stars caught in the diamond's net ?

Shall I whisper words of longing,
Praise thy lips and starry eyes,
Say that Goddess Venus, wronging,
Stole from thee young Paris' prize ?

No. I'll ne'er with music woo thee,
Nor with jewelled praises snare,
Since, though thou art perfect beauty,
Wisdom lacking, thou'rt not fair.

J.B.H.

The Natural History Society.

DURING the first half of last Term, while the days were still reasonably long, we had several very pleasant Saturday afternoon expeditions into the surrounding district. On these walks, we were very grateful to Mr. Fletcher and Mr. Effron for their valuable help to us in matters ornithological and entomological.

We arranged four lectures during the winter, of which three took place last Term, and one this. We had an excellent send off in a most interesting and instructive talk by Miss D. Downend, of the Weston Park Museum, on" General Natural History." Later in the Term, we were honoured in having Dr. Abercrombie to lecture us on " The Colour of Birds' Eggs," a subject of which he has made a special study. Our last lecture in the Autumn Term was given by Mr. J. M. Brown, B.Sc., of the Sorby Natural History Society. His subject, " Prehistoric Reptiles," attracted a large audience, and proved very interesting. We were further honoured this Term by the presence of Professor Eastham, M.A., of Sheffield University, who gave us an extremely interesting and instructive talk on " British Pond Life." This, like all our lectures, was well attended.

It has been decided that members should pay a small subscrip­tion each Term, to form a fund for building up a really useful reference library. We now have three sections in the Society :­Botany, Entomology and Ornithology, but a member need not belong to one only of these. The Botanical Section will aim at making a collection and record of the flora of the district, under the guidance of Mr. Fletcher. The Entomological Section will aim chiefly at investigating the life-cycles of local insects ; this Section will be in Mr. Effron's charge. The Ornithological Section also under Mr. Fletcher, hopes to collect photographs, rather than eggs or nests, and to discover many interesting facts about birds by means of experiments in ringing.

We have hopes that photography will play a large part in the work of each Section, and that in the future, we shall be able to arrange meetings at which members will give short talks, illustrated by lantern slides of their own making.

R. G. S. L.

Football.

EASTER TERM, 1937.

DESPITE the weather and the heavy grounds encountered, this has been a successful term for the 1st XI. Of the eight matches played six have been won and two drawn. The team has played very good football, the younger and less experienced members of the team, thanks to the coaching of Mr. Simm last term, have fitted in splendidly, and few changes have been necessary. The muddy grounds have prevented fast football but we have seen intelligent forward work backed up by keen and energetic tackling on the part of the defence. M. V. Saville as Captain has done much to keep the team in good training ; and particularly against the Old Edwardians gave an exhibition of very fine goalkeeping. W. S. Gray, back again in the forward line after an injury last term has done much towards our success. In defence W. A. Burley has again proved his sterling worth and saved us on many an occasion when a score seemed certain. L. P. Tingle and A. Holden at full­back have worked untiringly and improved consistently.

In the last match of the season against the Huddersfield Amateurs J. M. Fulford scored eight goals for the School, a very fine performance

W.E.G.

THE 2ND XI.

At the end of last term the matches were but poorly reported, so during the Christmas holidays I sat down to see what I could remember.

The first thing I remembered was Widdison's stockings, which singled him out from 22 players wearing the same shirts at Derby. Then there was the occasion when Miles led us to victory at Firth Park, wearing the colours of his Sunday School 1st XI. Above all loomed Bolly's bags, worthy of at least a rugger international.

Many incidents come to mind . . . Two glorious goals against Nether Edge by Ledingham and Shooter, hard shots high up in the corners. If all our shooting had been like that ! . . . Mortimer saving apparently hopeless situations ; Mortimer making a helpless gesture as Sorby scored off a Nether Edge behind ! . The best forward movement of the term in the second Nether Edge match. Ledingham kicked quickly to the centre, Moffatt pushed it out to the right wing in exactly the right position for Shooter to dash up and bang it in. About the one moment when we really played football . . . Goals neatly headed by Simmonite and Hayhurst . . Bolly spreadeagled on all four legs in the mud at Firth Park . Sanderson bulleting the ball out of dangerous situations . . . Miles being much too polite to bullet the ball into the opponents' goal . . Wheatley plodding away with great effect, politely removing the ball from the opponents' toes . . . Rhodes hurtling all over the field and swinging the ball up to the forwards . . . Nine men at Doncaster holding ten opponents and a gale of wind throughout the second half by kicking hard along the ground and keeping their heads.. . . A full team unable to take any advantage from another gale of wind against Nether Edge.

Finally the story of a sermon and its result. I was watching an away match. One of our forwards took the ball up the wing, the ball went quite obviously into touch, but he went on (there being no touch-judge) and very nearly scored. After this I preached a sermon on the subject to the team. and incidentally asked them to help referees over corner-goal-kick decisions. The next match was at home and I was refereeing. The ball went over the oppo­nent's line, I looked round enquiringly and one of our forwards gave it a goal-kick. Later the ball went over our line ; they were taking it out for a corner when one of their forwards said " Please sir, I think it's a goal-kick.  

Now a few points that strike me at the end of the season. I have noticed :­

That few people go hard
For goal-kicks.
For a ball in the air at any time.
For the man with the ball.
For an opponent about to shoot.
For the opposing goal-keeper.

That few people can sprint really fast for ten yards.

That opposing backs and halves send long kicks past our backs when they have strayed up-field. That this shatters the defenders' nerves, and that we rarely employ the same tactics.

That, in spite of the fact that they have spent most of their spare time from earliest childhood in kicking balls, few people can shoot. (I am more than surprised, I'm amazed).

And a few commendations :­
To Mortimer for his goal-keeping. To the forward line for some very good work this term. To the whole team, in that I never saw them give up against a better team or slack against a worse one.
" Up K. E."

           2ND XI. FOOTBALL RESULTS.

           CHRISTMAS TERM.

v.        Doncaster Grammar School 2nd XI (won) 3-1.

v.        Nether Edge Secondary School 1st XI (won) 5-2.

v.        Firth Park Secondary School 2nd XI (won) 5-3.

v.        Ackworth School 1st XI (lost) 4-5.

v.        Rotherham Grammar School 2nd XI (won) 9-2.

v.        Old Edwardians 2nd XI (lost) 4-5.

v.        Junior Technical School 1st XI (drew) 4-4.

v.        Nether Edge Secondary School 1st XI (won) 5-3.

           LENT TERM.

v.        Firth Park Secondary School 2nd XI (won) 7-0.

v.        Chesterfield Grammar School 2nd XI (won) 6-2.

v.        Central Secondary School 2nd XI (won) 9-3.

v.        Ackworth School 1st XI (lost) 3-10.

v.        Old Edwardians 2nd XI (lost) 3-6.

v.        Bootham School 2nd XI (won) 10-3.

 

Played.

Won.

Lost

Drawn.

 

14

9

4

1

" UNDER FIFTEEN " FOOTBALL.

Six matches have been played this season three have been won, one drawn, and two lost. The team is very much the same as last year's " Under 14 " team and they have played promising football. Downing F.C. and Rhodes P. were towers of strength until called into the 2nd XI. Powell G. G. and Mellor P. L. of the forwards have improved this year and should be very useful footballers next year. In the defence Tomlinson C., Parker M., and Richards I. H. have worked hard.

                 RESULTS.

(away)       v. Doncaster G. S. Under 15 XI. drew 5-5.

(home)      v. Nether Edge S. S. Under 15 XI, lost 1-4.

(home)      v. Central School Under 15 XI, won 2-1.

(away)       v. Nether Edge S. S. Under 15 XI, won 5-2.

(away)       v. Central School Under 15 XI, won 7-3.

(home)      v. Junior Technical School 2nd XI, lost 2-12.

W.E.G.

FOOTBALL-UNDER 14.

With only two members of last year's team still available and the heavy going being a great handicap to our exceptionally light side, we have some excuse for a rather lean season. We have built up a promising team eventually, in which Gebhard, J. D. was outstanding both as player and captain. Had not Simmerson H. G. our stalwart centre-half, been out of action for several weeks our results would have been very different. He is a player of consider­able ability.

                   OPPONENTS.

Oct. 17       Doncaster Grammar School (home) 3-3.

Oct. 24       Nether Edge Secondary School (away) 2-6.

Nov. 14      Firth Park Secondary School (home) 2-8.

Nov. 28      Junior Technical School (away) 5-5.

Dec. 5         Central School (away) 2-6.

Dec. 19       Nether Edge Secondary School (home) 2-0.

Jan. 16        Firth Park Secondary School (away) 0-5.

Jan. 30        Chesterfield Grammar School (away) 0-7.

Feb. 6         Central School (home) 6-4.

Feb. 27       Chesterfield Grammar School (home) 6-4.

FINAL HOUSE TABLES, 1936-37. 1st XI.

 

P.

W.

L.

D.

For

Agnst.

Pnts.

Pos'tn.

CHATSWORTH

7

6

0

1

61

13

13

1

HADDON ..

7

6

1

0

89

23

12

2

LYNWOOD

7

5

1

1

65

21

11

3

WELBECK

7

4

3

0

71

30

8

4

CLUMBER..

7

3

4

0

48

48

6

5

ARUNDEL

7

1

6

0

27

88

2

6

WENTWORTH

7

1

6

0

18

71

2

7

SHERWOOD

7

1

6

0

12

96

2

8

     

2nd

XI.

       
 

P.

W.

L.

D.

For

Agnst.

Pnts.

Pos'tn.

CHATSWORTH

7

6

0

1

80

13

13

1

HADDON ..

7

5

2

0

24*

17

10

2

WELBECK

7

5

2

0

57

9

10

3

LYNWOOD

7

4

1

2

50

16

10

4

SHERWOOD

7

2

3

2

25

58

6

5

CLUMBER..

7

1

4

2

20

30

4

6

ARUNDEL

7

1

6

0

19

80

2

7

WENTWORTH

7

0

6

1

2

54t

1

8

     

3rd XI.

         
 

P.

W.

L.

D.

For

Agnst.

Pnts.

Pos'tn.

LYNWOOD

7

6

0

1

54

20

13

1

HADDON..

7

4

1

2

52

46

10

2

CLUMBER..

7

3

1

3

40

15

9

3

CHATSWORTH

7

3

2

2

40

21

8

4

WENTwORTH

7

2

3

2

20

22

6

5

ARUNDEL

7

2

4

1

32

40

5

6

WELBECK

7

1

5

1

18

48t

3

7

SHERWOOD

7

1

6

0

7*

60

2

8

* by default.

1' lost by default.

K.E.S. 1ST XI V. ROTHERHAM GRAMMAR SCHOOL 1ST XI.

Played at Whiteley Woods on Saturday November 21st. Unlike the usual November weather, the wintry sun was shining brilliantly at the beginning of the game and the frosty tang in the air was just sufficient to make hard play necessary. Saville won the toss and chose to play towards the stream Shortly after the kick-off the School, who were pressing strongly, broke through and Sivil G. B. scored from the wing. Rotherham fought back strongly and snapped two goals in quick succession from Steer and Swindin. Play was extremely fast and skilful work was witnessed on both sides. Williams R. H. D. equalised for K.E.S. about ten minutes before half-time, but Rotherham again put on a spurt which resulted in two goals being scored within five minutes, so that at half-time Rotherham held a lead of two.

Half-time score-K.E.S. 2, Rotherham 4.

At the beginning of the second half it looked as if Rotherham were going to walk away with the match for they scored again, but the School, urged on by the cheers of the spectators began to press again and a stout fight ensued.

At last Sivil G. B. broke through and scored. Within three minutes he had repeated the performance and the School were only one behind. After another battle in mid-field Sivil broke through again and centred to Fulford J. M. who headed the ball into the net, bringing K.E.S. level. In spite of a continuance of attacks, the game finished without further score and the match ended in a draw. The last twenty minutes had been perhaps among the most sensational incidents in the history of School sport.

Result :-K.E.S. 5, Rotherham 5.

Scorers :-Sivil G. B. 3, Williams R. H. D. 1, Fulford J. M. 1.

K.E.S. 1ST XI v. FIRTH PARK SECONDARY SCHOOL 1ST XI.

Played at Sheffield Lane Top on Saturday, January 16th. A strong wind blowing over a badly sloping pitch made play rather wild and passing during the first half was exceptionally weak. As a result the scrappy play of the first twenty minutes brought no score. Then K.E.S. managed to break through and Fulford J. M. scored giving the School first blood. Shortly afterwards Gray W. S. also broke through and scored and a few moments later, a clever run by Rollin resulted in Fulford scoring again. At this point, Firth Park put up a strong fight and managed to take play into their opponents' half. A quick raid ended in a headed goal for the home team, but Sivil G. B. also scored for K.E.S., bringing the half time score to 4-1 for K.E.S.

Half-time :-K.E.S. 4, Firth Park 1.

K.E.S. had had the better way during the first half and it looked as if they would have to fight hard to keep their lead, but as it turned out, the School had little difficulty in increasing their lead. Gray W. S. scored twice and Williams R. H. D., who seemed to be playing better against the hill, scored three. Sivil G. B. scored again to bring the School's score to 10. Through­out the game, although K.E.S. were usually on top, play was not satisfying. There were occasional flashes of brilliance but the general appearance of the game was more that of a House Match than a School fixture. Many chances were missed and the whole team seemed to be still feeling the weight of Christmas fare.

Result :-K.E.S. 10, Firth Park, 1.

Scorers :-Williams R. H. D. 3, Gray W. S. 3, Sivil G. B. 2, Fulford J. M. 2.

K.E.S. 1ST XI V. CHESTERFIELD GRAMMAR SCHOOL 1ST XI.

Played at Whiteley Woods on Saturday January 30th. Several inches of snow which had fallen during the preceding day, aided by a snow storm made play extremely difficult. Saville lost the toss and the school kicked off towards the Coppice. K.E.S. quickly took charge of the game and for the first half hour, kept play well in their opponents' half. Fulford J. M. quickly headed a good centre from Williams R. H. D. into the net and followed it some ten minutes later by another. By this time the visitors were pressing much more strongly, and play was mainly in mid-field. Shortly before half­time Sivil G. B. broke through and scored with a beautiful oblique shot, bringing the half-time score to 3-0.

Half-time Score :-K.E.S. 3, Chesterfield 0.

The Chesterfield team opened the second half by pressing strongly and their energetic game resulted in two quick goals reducing the School's lead to one. The School fought back strongly however and Sivil G. B. scored again but Chesterfield kept on pressing and scored another goal before slackening the pace a little. Shortly before full-time, Sivil G. B. scored a third goal bringing the final score to 5-3 for K.E.S. Considering conditions, play was good and especially in the first half the forwards showed more dash than at any time in the season. Burley W. A. at centre-half played his usual thorough game in holding the defence together.

Result :-School 5, Chesterfield 3. Scorers :-Sivil G. B. 3, Fulford J. M. 2.

SCHOOL V. SHEFFIELD FALCONS.

Played at Whiteley Woods, Saturday February 6th. The game was played under delightful conditions, with the School the more aggressive side in the first half defending the goal at the brook end. A lead of three goals was obtained by the School and the game seemed to be well in our favour, but the Falcons, noted for their fighting spirit, had reduced the lead by two goals when half-time was reached.

Half-time score- School, 3, Falcons 2.

In the first half hour of the second half the School dominated the play once again and increased their lead by two more goals. During this period the Falcons were mostly on the defence and once again it looked as if the School would run up a large score. The whole outlook was changed, however, and the School defence found itself under terrific pressure with an entirely changed forward line continually sweeping down the field. Two quick goals were registered against us and the latter stages of the game were spent in success­fully striving to keep out the Falcons.

Final Score :-School 5, Falcons 4. Scorers :-Rollin 1, Sivil 2, Fulford 2.

K.E.S. 1ST XI V. CENTRAL 1ST XI.

Wednesday, February 10th, at Whiteley Woods. School won the toss and kicked off towards the brook on the very muddy 2nd eleven pitch. School at once attacked and almost immediately Fulford scored from a fast last minute pass by Sivil who had run through half the Central team. Central struggled to equalise but clever individual play was wasted and they did not score. Five minutes from half-time Sivil cut in from the left wing and completely beat the Central goalkeeper to put School two up.

Immediately on resumption Central attacked hard on the dry top wing and scored. A few minutes later they drew equal and K.E.S. had to fight hard. However Williams A. H. D. scored from bottom right wing to put K.E.S. into the lead again. Both sides were tired and the school was slower than ever, but three minutes before the end, Gray scored in a scramble in front of the Central goalmouth to give K.E.S. a 4-2 victory. Mud made play very difficult, but the School constantly ignored the possibilities of the dry top wing. Both sides missed many chances. For K.E.S. Sivil, Gray, Burley and Rollin played especially well.

K.E.S. 1ST XI V. CHESTERFIELD 1ST XI

February 13th, 1937 at Chesterfield. Played under almost unplayable conditions of mud at Chesterfield. The whole K.E.S. forward line attacked strongly from the first and the over eager Chesterfield defence had to cede a penalty, from which Gray scored with a beautiful curling shot to the top left

hand corner of the net. Both sides struggled hard in the mud which rendered skilful play impossible. But K.E.S. refused to look for the man when passing and many promising starts were wasted. A little before half-time Sivil scores for K.E.S. and Chesterfield immediately replied, the score at half-time being 2-1 to K.E.S.

Three minutes after resumption Gray scored again for K.E.S., to be followed at once by a goal by Rollin. Chesterfield struggled hard and from a bad defensive bungle in the K.E.S. goal, scored to make the score 4-2 against them. Still Chesterfield fought hard but unavailingly to draw equal, but the School defence was just good enough to keep them at bay, while K.E.S. constantly raided, Fulford and Williams scoring to give K.E.S. a 6-2 victory. It was s game of missed chances, not all of them due to mud. Of the forwards, Rollin and Gray played conspicuously well and in the defence Burley and Buckley alone were sound.

1ST XI V. OLD EDWARDIANS.

Played at Whiteley Woods, Saturday, February 20th. Saville won the toss and selected to kick towards the brook and so the School defence had the prospect of kicking in a sea of mud, while the other half of the field was quit( respectable. The first ten minutes saw two swift attacks by the School, Gras shooting wide both times. At the other end W. S. Parker shot wide, with only Saville to beat, after he had received a clever pass down the middle. Apart from this, play was very even both sides being very closely matched and then was a great deal of mid-field play with both sets of forwards striving to break through. After twenty-five minutes, however, the Old Edwardians took the lead when W. S. Parker hooked in a centre from R. Sivil with his right foot. The lead was not held for long, for a few minutes later Fulford scored from the edge of the penalty area with a powerful left foot drive when E. Sivil and Thirkill were trying to decide, who should clear the ball. The Old Edwardian regained the lead five minutes later when R. Gray kicked the ball over the line a split-second before Saville could collect. The School were not perturbed however and persistent attacks were awarded just before half-time when Fulford headed a brilliant goal from a hard centre by Williams.

Half-time :-School 2, Old Edwardians 2.

The School were the first to attack in the second half and swept down the field straight from the kick-off, but the pressure was relieved for the Old Edwardians in the form of a goal-kick. Play continued to be even as before with perhaps a slightly larger proportion of the play to the School. It was the-Old Edwardians, however, who took the lead again. A corner was forced on the right and R. Sivil's kick was met first time by Pearson H. standing or the edge of the penalty area. His shot gave Saville no chance. The School retaliated and a cross-shot by Gray was just the wrong side of the post Directly following the goal-kick the School drew level again. A shot by a School forward was deflected by E. Sivil and the ball stopped just short of the goal-line, but G. B. Sivil rushed it over before a clearance was possible. For the next ten minutes the School attacked continuously and Williams had a hard luck with a shot which struck the bar and went out for a goal-kick Eventually the School were successful with a picture-goal. Wheatley passed the ball to G. B. Sivil, who put it straight down the wing to Gray, who had run out from the inside position. The latter sent across a centre which Fulford coolly placed past Levi with his head. Thus with only about ten-minutes tog( the School had gained the lead but success was short. The Old Edwardians drew level again with a surprise drive by Thirkill from eighteen yards and finished off with repeated attacks, which the school defence did well to repel. Saville made several brilliant saves and managed to keep his goal intact during those last ten hectic minutes.

Final Score :-School 4, Old Edwardians 4.

Teams.

The School:-M. V. Saville, A. Holden, L. P. Tingle ; T. R. Buckley, W. A. Burley, P. J. Wheatley ; R. H. D. Williams, D. A. Rollin, J. Fulford, W. S. Gray, G. B. Sivil.

Old Edwardians :-R. Levi ; S. Pearson, E. W. Sivil ; F. Melling, D. Parker, C. Thirkill; V. R. Sivil, H. Pearson, R. Gray, W.S. Parker, C. Smith.

K.E.S. 1ST XI v. BOOTHAM 1ST XI.

Played at York on Wednesday, February 24th. The Bootham pitch was in a good condition. It did not appear to have been played on lately and it was fairly dry. Bootham won the toss and played with the wind which was quite strong. At first, play was rather against K.E.S., but Saville M. V. playing in goal did not have much work to do. K.E.S. playing on a dry pitch and with a light ball, found it difficult to keep the ball down. But after a time they grew used to it and play became fairly even. Half time came without any score.

In the second half the wind was not so strong but it was still cold. Boot­ham had a good touch line and they cheered quite heartily. But they were unable to cheer often because the Bootham team, although they played a very strenuous game, were unable to keep the ball in the K.E.S. half. It must be said that the combination work by both teams was well worth watching. On the K.E.S. side the ball swept gracefully across the field from Sivil G. B. who was playing left wing to Burley W. A. a half who had played a very noble game. He would pass to Williams, R. H. D. on the right wing. But after this unique team work Williams and other players on the forward line were unable to beat the Bootham goal keeper. Sivil G. B. frequently centred the ball to Fulford J. M. who unsuccessfully tried to head the ball in to the goal. Play was extremely fast in the second half, but in spite of the tremendous efforts made by both teams no goals were scored.

Result :-K.E.S. 0, Bootham 0.

K.E.S. 1ST XI V. HUDDERSFIELD AMATEURS.

Played at Whiteley Woods Sheffield on Saturday, February 27th. The School pitch was in its worst possible condition. It had already been badly churned up during the season and conditions were made worse by the recent heavy rainfall. The School Captain, Saville M. V. won the toss and decided to play with the wind. School were not as quick into their game as their more experienced opponents, and Chambers I. of Huddersfield scored within the first three minutes. The School quickly retaliated and Fulford J. M. scored with along shot making the score 1-1. School realising how important it was to get as many goals as possible while playing with the wind kept the ball well away from their goal. Then Fulford J. M. broke through the Huddersfield defence and scored giving the School the lead. Huddersfield encouraged by Chapman R. A. their captain and centre forward fought back strongly but could not prevent Fulford J. M. from scoring two more goals. Huddersfield then brought their score up to three. Fulford at centre forward played a brilliant game to score three more goals, against another one by Huddersfield. This score, in favour of the School gave a fair indication of the respective merits of each team.

Half-time score :-School 7, Huddersfield 4.

Playing conditions were now made worse by rain. Huddersfield opened the score despite strenuous efforts made by the School halves especially Burley. There were terrific struggles in front of the School goal, but the defence played a dour game and Saville M. V. frequently relieved the pressure by dashing out for the ball and punting it well down the field, from which the School managed to get another goal. Huddersfield helped by the wind though, could not be denied, and the School had to yield two more goals making the score 8-7 in the School's favour. Then two corner kicks against the School brought disaster. The first yielded a second, then Dawson I. of Huddersfield who had previously received a bad kick on the knee, taking this corner, amidst tremendous excitement amongst players and spectators alike, placed the ball well into the goalmouth. In attempting to clear it and mark his man at the same time, one of the School halves had the misfortune to slice the ball into his own goal. With the whistle due to blow " Time " any moment, each team though dead weary, muddied up, and leg tired, wanted the winning goal. Huddersfield got the ball well into the School half but were repulsed, and marvellous team work by the School team saw the ball well into the Huddersfield half. A pass was sent to Gray from Simmonite W. and although strongly challenged by the Huddersfield left-back, he managed to break through and with a splendid shot put the ball into the far corner of the net, so giving the School the leading goal. This was the last match of the Season for the School team, and their victory was a fitting and well earned conclusion.

K.E.S. 2ND XI V. JUNIOR TECHNICAL SCHOOL 1ST XI.

Played at Whiteley Woods on Saturday, December 12. School kicked off and in their first attack were unlucky not to score through a hard shot by Holden. Play became very even, but fortune favoured the visitors, who scored three times despite good work by the home defence. Repeated attacks by School forwards were all unavailing.

Half-time :-K.E.S. 0, Technical School 3.

In the second half School were more determined, though the attacks were scrappy. However, Holden obtained possession of the ball in front of the visitor's goal and reduced the arrears. The Technicals made repeated attacks and several times only good work by Mortimer prevented them from scoring. Eventually their efforts were rewarded and they netted to make the score 4-1 in their favour. School attacked with determination and Holden again scored. The forwards still pressed hard and added two more goals ; both from scrambles in front of the net, to make the score level at 4-4. Both sides made desperate attempts to score a winning goal, but without success and game ended in a draw.

Result :-K.E.S. 2nd XI. 4, junior Technical School 4.

K.E.S. 2ND XI. V. NETHER EDGE SECONDARY SCHOOL 1ST XI.

Springfield Road, December 19th. Nether Edge won the toss, and School kicked off against the sun and a strong breeze. In a well-executed movement, Shooter obtained possession of the ball, cut in unopposed, and netted with a shot that gave the goalkeeper no chance. At this period school gained the upper hand, and Miles scored, to make School two up. Nether Edge rallied and play became even, a Nether Edge forward netting the' ball with a lucky shot which just hit the upright and went in. School pressed hard and were unlucky not to score ; the next goal however came from Nether Edge. The opposing forwards, though not so fast as ours, were more tricky and managed to confuse the School defenders so much that Nether Edge took the lead when Sorby put the ball through his own goal off the legs of an attacking forward. School again pressed hard and their efforts were rewarded when Simmonite scored to make the scores level.

Score at half-time, 3-3.

On resumption, play was very even, both sides attacking in turn. School defence however was strong and all Nether Edge's attacks were of no avail. School was more successful and demonstrated the weakness of the opposing defenders. Simmonite netted his second goal and Ledingham added another to make the score 5-3. Shooter was several times unlucky not to score.

Result :-K.E.S. 2nd XI 5, Nether Edge 1st XI 3.

K.E.S. 2ND XI V. CHESTERFIELD 2ND XI.

Played at Chesterfield on Saturday, January 30th. The ground, which was slightly on the slope, was under a covering of snow. School lost the toss and were set to kick up the slope. From the centre School exerted pressure and after a short time Shooter opened the scoring, netting from close range after a scram­ble in the goal-mouth. After the restart, Chesterfield went on the attack, and it was not long before the equaliser came, with a close range shot into the corner of the net. Chesterfield continued to press and soon took the lead with a grand drive. School fought back and were awarded a penalty, from which Miles hit the post, but a little later he equalised. First half fairly even.

Half-time :-K.E.S. 2, Chesterfield 2.

With School kicking down the slope, they attacked for most of the second half. They soon took the lead, Miles scoring with a glorious shot. School kept up the pressure, and Shooter put the School further ahead, the goalkeeper failing to hold the ball. Chesterfield occasionally broke away but were never very dangerous. Another goal was added for the School by Miles, who thus completed his hat-trick. The scoring was completed by Pashley, when the goalkeeper dropped the ball as he followed up. Throughout the game the halves, Rhodes in particular, played very well, the backs were sound, and Moffatt was the best forward. The team on the whole played a good game.

Result :-K.E.S. 6, Chesterfield 2.

K.E.S. 2ND XI V. CENTRAL 2ND Xl.

Played at High Storrs, Wednesday February 10th. The game started with K.E. suffering from their usual first-minute paralysis and two breakaway goals by Central. Many times during the game they looked like repeating this effort, but they only once succeeded though we had several narrow escapes. Once a Central forward broke away and shot past Mortimer as he ran out, but the ball hit the post. Mortimer played very well and saved us a number of goals. On one occasion he punched out from a melee on one side of the goal-mouth and then dashed across to the other just in time to smother a shot when a Central forward appeared to have an open goal.

We soon recovered from the paralysis and scored fairly steadily throughout the rest of the game. The forward line was working well and Pashley on the left wing was outstanding. He was unused to the position but he produced some magnificent bursts of speed up the wing, and one goal came from his beating a defender in a dash for the ball near the goal. Miles presented a penalty to the goalkeeper (a little habit of ours about this time!).

Two goals stand out as exceptional. Moffatt collected a goal-kick thing which there were too few attempts to do) and put it back into the to, corner before the goalkeeper had time to think. Just at the end Miles pushed the ball out to Shooter who came in very fast and put a hard shot in from an acute angle just under the bar.

The backs and halves were efficient and Rhodes at centre-half was out standing.

Result :-Won 9-3.

Scorers :-Shooter, Sanderson, Moffatt, Pashley 2, Miles 1.

K.E.S. 2ND XI v. ACKWORTH 1ST.

Played at Ackworth on Wednesday, February 17th. School won the toss, which was not much advantage as the ground was level. Throughout the first-half the School were overwhelmed by the beautiful passing of Ackworth who had a perfect understanding. Goals came at fairly regular intervals The first goal resulted from a miskick by Mortimer, but later he made some good saves. Their best goal was a beautiful first timer by the centre forward which flashed into the top of the net. When the score was 3-0, the School were awarded a penalty, but Shooter was off the mark.

Half-time :-6-0

After half-time, the School improved, and after continued pressure, Downing scored from short range, following good work by Pashley. The game was now even, and soon the School scored a second, Downing pushing the ball through as the goalie ran out. Ackworth now gradually forced the School back, and scored two more goals, following beautiful approach work. School now put all into attack, and finally Shooter headed through from a centre by Pashley. Bolsover had to go off for a minute after a heavy fall, but soon returned Ackworth added two further goals near the end, and finished worthy winners. Their standard of football was higher than that of our team.

Result :-Ackworth 10, School 3.

K.E.S. 2ND XI V. OLD EDWARDIANS 2ND XI.

February 20th. The conditions at Norton were rendered difficult by a stiff wind at the start of the game and by snow and hail later. The School soon showed that they were the cleverer side, the half-backs combining with the forwards in a creditable manner. Miles gave them a well deserved lead, but the Old Boys retaliated with determination and obtained two quick goals, although they missed many easier chances. After Moffatt had shot through a crowd of players to equalise, the Old Boys once more took the lead, Shortly before half-time Pashley scored from a difficult angle, when the ball struck the post before entering the net.

Half-time :-School 3, Old Edwardians 3.

In the second half the School began to feel the effects of the fearful conditions and the Old Boys were able to score three goals without reply. Although the School defence fought back pluckily and the forwards were by no means idle, weight and stamina eventually triumphed over technique.

Result :-School 3, Old Edwardians 6. Scorers :-Miles, Moffatt, Pashley.

K.E.S. 2ND XI v. BOOTHAM 2ND XI.

February 24th. A heavy ground greeted the players at Whiteley Woods and its effect upon the game was soon revealed when defenders frequently erred and many passes went astray. After many even exchanges, in which Bootham used the more straightforward methods, Miles gave the School a lead of two goals. Valiant saves by the Bootham goalkeeper from cross shots on the right often relieved the pressure on his goal, whilst three excellent efforts by their centre forward quickly made the score three goals to two in Bootham's favour.

Half-time :-School 2, Bootham 3.

It was an inspired School eleven that began the second half, with Miles conspicuous in attack. It was not uncommon to see the whole of the Bootham defence packed in front of its goal, and all the School's goals were scored from close range. After Miles had equalised and Simmonite had gained the lead, further goals were scored by Miles (4), and Moffatt (2). Credit must be given to the defence, which dealt successfully with the occasional raids of the Bootham forwards and thus enabled the School forwards to tire a heavier defence.

Result :-School 10, Bootham 3. Scorers :-Miles 7, Moffatt 2, Simmonite.

Old Edwardians.

We deeply regret to record the death of J. OWEN WYNNE, Lieut., 2nd Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment. He died of pneumonia following influenza, at the R.A.F. Hospital, Sanafand, Palestine. He was at K.E.S. from 1922 to 1924, while his father, the late Dr. F. E. Wynne, was Medical Officer of Health for Sheffield, and in this Magazine a year ago we reported his marriage which had just taken place. We offer our sincere sympathy to his widow and relatives.

A. J. MEMMOTT (1926-1933) has taken up an appointment with the United Africa Co., and writes from " Boutha, Sherbro', Sierra Leone," where he is making the acquaintance of palm-oil, palm­kernels, cocoa, ivory, one white man, and a large native staff.

Congratulations to K. P. Stanley who in December last passed with Honourable Mention the " Higher " Pianoforte Examination of the Associated Board of the Royal School of Music.

An O.E. in Rhodesia.

A. L. HORNSBY (1923-29) writes from the B.S.A. Police, Fort Tuli, Southern Rhodesia :­

" Of all O.E.'s scattered throughout this Empire of ours, I think I can safely say that at present, I am the most isolated of them all.

I was appointed to the command of the Police District of Fort Tuli late in September this year, my previous Station having been Fort Victoria, almost in the opposite extremity of the Colony. I have already seen much of Rhodesia and Portuguese East Africa in the four years that I have been abroad.

Not only am I the only white officer (I have a detachment of Native Police for Patrol work), but the only white man in approxi­mately 1,500 square miles of absolutely primeval Africa, the only mark of civilisation being the little clearing in which my bungalow and Office is situated in the fastness of the wilds, with the good old Union Jack flaunting high above the bush and jungle.

My Station is built on rising ground, only some few hundred yards from the Shashi river, the natural boundary between Rhodesia and the Protectorate of Bechuanaland. This river rises and is fed from the hills in the Protectorate, and is almost half a mile wide here ; it flows into the Limpopo some fifty miles downstream, which junction -is the southern boundary of my District, the northern boundary being where the Shashani joins the Shashi, also some fifty miles, upstream. My chief duties consist of Police supervision and Guard of this strip of border territory adjoining Bechuanaland. For nine months of the year the Shashi is almost completely dry and quite passable. Also, I am the Doctor, Postal Officer, Revenue Collector and general factotum.

Except for the Native Mail Runner, who performs the journey to the little village of Gwanda, 120 miles to the north-east, each way, monthly, and the telegraph to Palapye in Bechuanaland, some 200 miles over the border, which I might add, is 70 per cent. of the time out of action owing to the playful little ways of the elephant, I am completely shut off from the outside world. Any attempt at describing the life and conditions would be absurd ; one has to experience it to appreciate them fully.

One finds the great solitude, tremendous heat, fever and complete lack of the amenities of civilisation, very trying at times. One's nerves are tried to the limit, and it certainly puts one to the extreme test of one's ability, self-control and discipline. However, someone must hold these lonely outposts or we would have no Empire.

There is a great profusion of game, as is to be expected in such a wild and undeveloped expanse of territory, and all the Fauna of Africa are well represented, including the carnivorae. Only this afternoon, one of my ` boys ' came running into the Office and reported a pride of lions down at the Shashi. The hunting is really, wonderful, and offers anything from elephant to guinea-fowl. I have enjoyed very good sport so far ; enjoying the thrills of big­game hunting, and being able to combine this sport with one's duties makes up for a great deal, in this rather exacting life.

It is all a wonderful experience ; I think it is a great pity that the average Englishman at home has not the opportunity of seeing and knows so little of this wonderful Empire of ours. However, life in tropical Africa for a white man alone, is really no good, and there comes a time when Africa palls and London calls. This occurs for me in October next, when I shall be coming Home on six months' furlough.

With all good wishes for the coming year.

Yours sincerely,

A. L. HORNSBY."

Old Edwardians' Cricket Club.

TWO teams are to be run during the 1937 Season-this was the decision reached at a well-attended meeting of the Club in February last. For the last three or four seasons it has been found possible to raise only one team each Saturday, but as several younger members have joined this year I hope this will be the forerunner of many successful two-teamed " Seasons.

I would like to mention to boys at School who may like to join the Club (and I cordially invite them to do so) that new members will not automatically be put into the second team irrespective of their cricketing abilities. There is room in the first team for good players of any age or experience. If boys at School would like to play, but feel that they are not good enough or would not know the older players, I recommend them to give us a trial. Cricket with the Old Edwardians is cricket, but it is also very great fun.

OOZY

The Officers appointed for the coming Season are :       

First Team.

Captain J. T. Burdekin. Vice Captain.-C. Thirsk.

Second Team.

Captain. A. Elliott. Vice Captain.-V. P. G. Brough.

There were so many applications for the position of Honorary Secretary that I decided I had better, perhaps, retain that position myself !

We are looking forward very much to the match v. the School, and hope for a fine day and many spectators.

I would like to offer my best wishes to the School Elevens during the 1937 Season and hope they do well ; in particular I would like to see Burley make a century against us on Old Boys' Day.

R. G. BEARD,
Honorary Secretary.
45, Bank Street, Sheffield.

Notices.

Contributions for the THE MAGAZINE should be addressed to the EDITOR, SCHOOL MAGAZINE, K.E.S. A box will also be found in the School Library into which all communications may be put.

All Contributions should be written clearly in ink, on one side of the paper only, with an ample margin on the left-hand side. It is a convenience if the number of words in an article be stated at the top of the first page.

The Editor will be glad to be kept informed of the doings of O.E.'s-­especially those in distant parts of the world-in order that THE MAGAZINE may form a link between them and the School.

THE MAGAZINE can be supplied to any other than present members of the School at 6d. per copy, or for a subscription of 1 /6 a year, post free.

OLD EDWARDIANs' ASSOCIATION.-Hon. Secretary, G. A. Bolsover, 70, Queen Street, Sheffield.

O.E.'s FOOTBALL CLUB.-All boys leaving School who wish to join should communicate with the Hon. Secretary, R. LEVI, 96, Southgrove Road, Sheffield, 10.