King Edward VII School Magazine.

VOL. IX]
MARCH, 1936
[No. 5.

Editors:
E. NAGLE, H. Y. LARDER.

Hon. Sec.:
Mr. E. F. WATLING.

CONTENTS.

 

PAGE

 

PAGE

Senior Cross-Country Races 1936

199

Old Edwardians

218

Christmas Entertainment

201

Old Edwardians Dramatic Society

219

To Fly or not to Fly

204

   

Scientific Society

205

Old Edwardians Cricket Club

222

Orchestra Notes

207

Junior School Football

222

Macabre

207

The Junior Cross-Country Run

223

Confessional

209

The Chess Club

224

Holiday Competition No. 1

209

Scouting

225

Football

210

House Notes

227

Oxford Letter

215

Notices

230

Senior School Cross-Country Races, 1936.

THESE events were held on Saturday, 14th March, when fine and cool weather prevailed. Owing to bad weather in the earlier part of the Term, and the resulting extension of the Football Season, regular Wednesday and Saturday training runs had been impossible for many boys, particularly the older ones. Those who had run last year, when we had a long period for steady training, had, however, regained good style before the races, and in the events, most boys ran without undue strain. The numbers competing were not quite as big as last year's, partly owing to illnesses.

In the "Under 14" event, Wade, L. M. ran with great ease and left the others well behind. Parsons, G. H., a young runner, and winner of last year's junior School Run, ran very well and finished second. Longden, J. H.'s third place, was very creditable and was probably a surprise to the next three, who were in the first eight last year. Lacy, F. V., was, unfortunately, troubled by "stitch".

A good race was expected in the "Over 14" event, as eight "colours" were competing. Perhaps the most interesting feature was the duel between Melling, F. and Fulford, J. M., both winners on previous occasions. Fulford set the pace, but Melling kept at his heels until the top of Common Lane was reached, when he went ahead to finish first with a considerable lead. Byrne, J. G. was this year's surprise, as he was 24th last year. Houghton, F. J. and Haigh, F. the two new "colours," have reaped the reward of steady training last year and this.

Our thanks are due to Allison, R., Biggin, F., Foggitt, C. H. (old boys) and Larder, H. Y., who laid the trails. Also to Messrs. Gaskin, Magrath and Savage for taking the results.

Runners brought back stories of a deep, miry bog, and no doubt have their own opinion as to whether its inclusion was unavoidable or deliberate.

R.G.E.
RESULTS

UNDER 14.

OVER 14.

(91 runners).

(85 runners).

1 Wade, L. M.

Cl.

1 Melling, F.

Cl.

2 Parsons, G. H.

Cl.

2 Fulford, J. M.

Wel.

3 Longden, J. H.

Wen.

3 Williams, R. H. F.

L.

4 Banner, J. H.

Sh.

4 Byrne, J. G.

Wel.

5 Lacy, F. V.

Sh.

5 Pashley, D.

Sh.

6 Bagnall, J. T.

L.

6 Houghton, F. J.

Ch.

7 Cotton, J. M.

Sh.

7 Haigh, F.

L.

8 Dodge, K. S.

Wel.

8 Settle, J. W.

Wel.

 

(Winner's time-27 mins. 25 secs.).

HOUSE POSITIONS AND POINTS.

1 Sherwood

94

1 Welbeck

75

2 Clumber

112

2 Clumber

101

3 Haddon. .

125

3 Lynwood

102

4 Lynwood

151

4 Haddon

139

5 Wentworth

160

5 Sherwood

208

6 Chatsworth

183

6 Chatsworth

215

7 Arundel

302

7 Arundel

219

8 Welbeck

 

8 Wentworth

277

(team incomplete)

     

WINNING TEAMS.

Banner, J. T.

4

Fulford, J. M.

2

Lacy, F. V.

5

Byrne, J. G.

4

Cotton, J. M.

7

Settle, J. W.

8

Milner, G. M.

16

Kay, L. R.

15

Bolton, J. G.

28

Widdison, J. A.

21

Quickfall, K.

34

Wang, M. S.

.25

Christmas Entertainment.

PROGRAMME

   

PART I.

 
 

l. OVERTURE "Eine Kleine Nachtmusik "Mozart

 
   

First Movement

 
 

2. PLAY "Thirty Minutes in a Street "Beatrice Mayor

 
 

A Stray Man

P. W. BROWNE

 
 

A Man with a Bag

J. A. WIDDISON

 
 

A Rich Lady

G. S. F. GILL

 
 

A Curate

E. MARSH

 
 

An Actor

S. HAMLEY

 
 

A Child

J. B. OWEN

 
 

First Charwoman

T. D. NICHOLSON

 
 

Second Charwoman

F. H. ROTHWELL

 
 

A Girl

C. R. SIFTON

 
 

A Visitor

W. H. HOLROYD

 
 

A Hostess

J. H. WILLIAMS

 
 

A Young Man

P. E. SYLVESTER

 
 

A Professor

A. R. EVANS

 
 

A Student

K. A. CHARE

 
 

First Shop Girl

A. N. BLACKHURST

 
 

Second Shop Girl

P. RHODES

 
 

An Old Lady

A. G. BLAKE

 
 

An Elderly Gentleman

M. V. SAVILLE

 
 

A Musician

J. A. WIDDISON

 
 

First Servant

H. F. GUITE

 
 

Second Servant

G. M. WORTON

 
   

Scene : A Street

 
 

(Setting

by P. E. SYLVESTER)

 

3. Music (a) Bourree. From Flute Sonata No. 5 Handel

String Orchestra and Percussion

(b) Song. "Where Corals Lie " Elgar

Mr. W. E. GLISTER

4. PLAY "Father Noah " Geoffrey Whitworth

Noah A. J. M. PEACE

Rachel K. GRAHAM

Shem J. B. HARRISON

Ham J. LEES

Japtheth G. D. BOLSOVER

Scene : The Hold of the Ark

(Costumes by Miss N. P. JONES)

INTERVAL

PART II.

"TRIAL BY JURY"
W. S. Gilbert & A. Sullivan

The Learned Judge

Mr E. F. WATLING

The Plaintiff

G. FRITH

The Defendant

Mr. J. K. MIcHELL

Counsel for the Plaintiff

Mr. C. S. WRIGHT

Usher

Mr. W. E. GLISTER

Foreman of the Jury

M. V. SAVILLE

The Jury : G. D. Bolsover, C. W. Fletcher, D. K. Griffith, F. Haigh, H. Hardy, P. H. Hopper, G. G. Lee, J. Lees, M. C. Lupton, E. Marsh, J. A. Widdison.

Bridesmaids : W. E. Wiggly, C. R. Sifton, D. M. Nichol, I. F. Trotter. Spectators : A. A. Caldwell, N. B. Firth, A-. G. Hardy, J. Lindsay, A. J.

Longden, R. Matthews, L. I. Norbury-Williams, G. D. Redston, A. D. Russell, J. Shillito, J. A. Smith, J. Stoney, R. F. Swallow. Scene : A Court of Justice

"I think they're wonderful,"says an enthusiastic lady in the Dining Hall, as she drinks the coffee for which she has fought so valiantly. She means the actors in the School Play. In the course of conversation you discover that owing to slight deafness she has not heard more than a portion of the dialogue, and that owing to a defect in her education, Elizabethan English is to her a series of puzzles. But she is there to applaud the boys' efforts, not to judge. In part this imaginary lady is right; effort is to be com-mended, especially as schoolboy actors are often required to run almost as soon as they can walk.

The Entertainment of last December made less demand than usual upon the boys-the ranks were stiffened with veterans - and partly for that reason it deserved the sincere and generous praise that was given to it. It was a splendid evening, and the unusually large number of boys who helped to make it so will remember it with pride, and I hope with gratitude to Mr. Watling and Mr. Baylis for their generalship in leading the allied regiments of music and drama-and by no means from behind.

The first play, Thirty Minutes in a Street, is on the surface a pleasant piece of fun,"demanding from the actors that sort of mimicry and caricature that the schoolboy is only too ready and skilful in applying to his elders. Beneath the surface it is possibly, as someone described it to me, a bitter satire on human selfishness. Stronger playing might have emphasised this aspect of the play. As it was, it was taken light-heartedly both by the actors and the audience. Excellent team-work and intelligent acting by individuals were helped by good costumes and make-up. I find it hard to choose anyone for particular praise. I thought the female characters, ranging from Owen as a lively little girl to Blake as an embarrassed old lady, were particularly good.

Upon me, Father Noah failed to make a decided impression, but I would blame myself or the play rather than the actors, or the admirable setting and costumes. I have heard many favourable opinions. Certainly Peace, Harrison, Lees and Bolsover showed a nice sense of contrasting character, delivered their lines intelligently, and moved easily and naturally, as befitted "old hands."

Trial by jury delighted everyone. The audience would have liked nothing better at the end than to have seen it all over again from start to finish. It was a happy instance of that co-operation between staff and boys which is sometimes no more than a theory. Mr. Watling, as the judge, was all that could be wished-his by-play was most judicial and judicious-and round him the lesser lights revolved in their due spheres. Mr. Michell, as the Defendant, was excellent too, a most abandoned wretch. Mr. Glister and Mr. Wright were well suited to their parts. The jury (ably led by Saville) and the spectators sang and acted with an obvious and infectious enjoyment. I have one criticism to make of Frith, the Plaintiff. However beautiful a voice a singer may have, I require to hear the words he is singing. At times I had no notion of what the words were. The Hall is no doubt partly to blame. Apart from this Frith did well. I had some difficulty in deciding between the competing charms of the bridesmaids, and will not disclose which one I finally gave my heart to.

I am not a competent critic of the orchestra. All I can say is that they more than satisfied my not too exacting demands, both in "Trial by jury "and in the interludes between the plays. They were helped by a large family of percussion players whose appearance captured the hearts of the more sentimental of the audience, whom I will not disillusion. Mr. Glister found full scope for his talent in a charming song by Elgar.

The best comment on the success of the evening is the general wish that the School should attempt a more difficult opera, since their ability to do so was so clearly shown and so much appreciated.

W. H. S.

To Fly or not to Fly.

SINCE October 3rd, when the School held a Parents' Day in which there was a model aeroplane exhibition, the School has shown considerable interest in these models; so perhaps a few words on the subject would not be out of place.

There are two main kinds of models-those that fly and those that do not. This is not meant to be a joke. By those that do not fly, we mean accurate replicas of the prototype which are generally carried out in solid wood. These are comparatively easy to build, but unless they are well finished, they are apt to look rather crude. The real skill comes in putting in plenty of accurate detail, a knowledge of which is often hard to come by.

The other type consists of those that do fly, and into this class we can put both scale and non-scale models. The perfect duration models which can sustain flight for anything over a minute are not usually copies of real planes. To those who do not consider a minute a long time, we give this advice : take a stop watch or one with a seconds hand, and carefully watch it pass through a minute. This will convince them that a minute is no mean duration. (An interesting experiment to perform in Practical Physics).

There are models, however, and these are extremely popular, which are copies of full-size machines, and yet do fly well, sometimes with a flight of 45 seconds, although they have only a wing-span of about 15 inches. These models are rather hard to design successfully.

The materials of which flying models are constructed are usually of American origin, i.e., balsa wood, Japanese tissue paper and bamboo. These may not sound American, but are recognised as such since the American model-builders were the first to recognise their value.

Until recently, English aero-modellers have used such materials as birch, beech, spruce and mahogany, all weighing at least, four times as much as balsa wood.

Cost ? Many boys are discouraged because they consider the hobby expensive. This is not so. A model of two feet wingspan can he built at a cost of Is. 6d., and complete outfits can be bought in Sheffield for as little as a shilling for a model of 12 inches wing-span. All the required materials can be obtained from the local branch of Hobbies, and the authors of this article will be glad to clear up any difficulties which may arise.

A helpful magazine for beginners entitled "Model Airplane News "can be ordered at any good newsagents, and each issue contains plans and instructions for several new models.

The authors will willingly supply any genuine enquirer with plans for a simple model.

A Club ? Although a model aeroplane club is already in existence in this city, we feel that a School Club might be appreciated by many inexperienced and therefore shy builders. We have various societies, so why not a Model Aero Club ? We should welcome enquiries from all those interested, and if such a Club were formed, it would perhaps be possible to arrange regular instruction in model building.

Names should be given to-

A. J. M. PEACE and R. A. CHERRY.

Scientific Society.

ON Wednesday, January 29th, a party of some 20 boys paid a visit to the works of Messrs. Walker and Hall, Limited.

The party was first shown how silver vessels are gradually pressed and moulded from sheets of the metal. We were then shown how small articles are silver-plated by the electrolytic process. The article to be plated is made the cathode of an electroly-tic cell; the anode consists of a plate of metallic silver and the cell is filled with a solution of potassium silver cyanide. Gold-plating was carried out in a similar manner, using a gold cathode and a solution of potassium auricyanide. The burnishing and', polishing of these articles was next inspected; and in another' department we saw the designers at work. The engraving depart-ment was then visited. This was perhaps the most interesting part of the whole visit; the speed and skill with which these talented artists work is astounding, and everyone was greatly impressed. In spite of the rain, the party decided to climb to the roof of the building, from which a very extensive view of the city is obtained.

On the following Wednesday, February 5th, the Chesterfield glass works of the British Thomson-Houston Company, Limited, were visited. On our arrival at the works we were first shown the apparatus in which the ingredients of the glass are mixed. We then saw how complicated pieces of glassware were hand-blown in small moulds, and the skill with which this work was done was admired by everyone. An automatic glass-blowing machine proved very interesting, and demonstrated how quickly and accurately electric light bulbs can be made. Another process which attracted considerable attention was the manufacture of glass rod. Semi-liquid glass is allowed to flow slowly from a large mandril on to a groove formed by a very large number of small pulley wheels, which rotate rapidly and carry the rodding to a machine, which cuts it into 4ft. lengths and automatically sorts it into various sizes.

It was decided to go to Derby this Half-Term holiday, and a party of 30 paid interesting visits to the works of the Royal Crown Derby Porcelain Company, Limited, in the morning and to the works of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway Company in the afternoon.

The last visit of the Term was to the works of Messrs. Brown Bayley's Steel Works, Limited, and took place on Wednesday, February 26th. The party was first shown the hand-charged Siemens-Martin open hearth furnaces, and then, by way of contrast, the electric furnace. The various stages in the manufacture of steel tyres were then seen, and the party was particularly interested in the automatic reheating furnaces. We then saw how springs are made, and the various stages in the forging of large axles were examined. We were then shown the mechanically-charged, open hearth furnaces, and the bar-rolling mill, both of which proved very interesting. At the conclusion of this excellent visit, the party was very kindly entertained to tea.

Orchestra Notes.

THE Orchestra has spent an industrious Term. A considerable amount of time has been devoted to the Andante movement of Haydn's Surprise Symphony which is to be the Test Piece for the whole orchestra in this year's festival at the Queen's Hall; so far the results have been extremely promising. The tone is good, especially in the legato passages; the various sections keep well together, and already there are signs of improvement in the differentiation between Piano and forte. Now that the flautists are well in evidence, however, they should make some effort occasionally to play in tune all the time.

This year the Orchestra is entering for an additional competition at the Festival. This competition is governed by the condition that the violinists must be under 16 years of age. The test piece is George Woodhouse's "Clown's Dance", which still requires a good deal of practice.

Two prominent features in this Term's work have been the general high standard of the sight-reading, and the excellent support afforded by the second violinists, who, although still very young and inexperienced, show great promise for the future.

A new member this Term is Mr. Helliwell, whose assistance in the brass section is greatly appreciated. In conclusion, may I state that the Orchestra is always very pleased to welcome new arrivals to swell its ranks.

L. R. K.

Macabre.

THE timid little boy of about nine stared with trembling fear at the gloomy building towering over him, as though the huge columns of stone would crash down upon him and crush his miserable bones.

He was seeing "King Edward's "for the first time.

It was a typical July afternoon. The sky, formerly a dirty grey colour, had turned purple, and the scanty grass below him became a sickly yellow hue. As he gazed, his imagination pictured mausoleums and even pagan crematoriums. He crawled, shuddering, up the steps and under the pseudo-classical facade, built a century ago to relieve the stark ugliness of the Victorian surroundings. Sick at heart he went on, through painted green doors into the gloomy, entrance chamber. Here his suburban soul revolted at the painted wooden pillars shrouded in gloom, topped by their dull white capitals. He choked and felt dizzy at the atmosphere, heavy with cold animal sweat and faintly acrid with the stench of chemicals. A constant groaning surged up, as of chained spirits in the underworld. There, were occasional cries as of a child in pain and weird melodies floated down on his ears. He passed on to where he could see into a great gloomy hall from which came infernal music, horribly discordant and suggestive of a band of demons and possessed ones playing in the lower circles of the inferno. Almost overcome with fright, he turned to see a great black figure swoop past like some evil bird, with black wings slowly flapping and greasy black locks hanging over the hawk like face. Spontaneously, from the hall behind there came a fearful clamour, the like of which he had never yet heard. He looked towards it. Inside, submerged in the semi-darkness, he saw vague figures with miserable faces, lacking any signs of united effort, yet all conveying the impression of taking part in some strange ritual. He again turned and a group of the hawk-like figures he had seen previously were swooping down. The din became unbearable. His soul revolted within him. He rushed towards the entrance through the entrance chamber and out into the open.

He tore down the steps and across the field; in desperation he looked hopefully towards a retired corner of the open space; here he saw a decrepit building, crumbling with age. There was a broken-down doorway in the wall. He turned through it. Inside all was at peace. Amidst the moss grown ruin lay a black pool. Its peaceful depths enticed him, soothing his weary soul. He let himself be lured over the edge and the swamp closed round him and sucked him down into its peaceful eternity.

Many years later, when the old swimming pool was dismantled, among the debris in the bottom was discovered a small frail skeleton.

R. A.

Confessional.

OH, face celestial ! Countenance divine !
Unsleeping watchman ! What sad fate is mine!
"Canst thou not give one minute more ?
A minute, and I'll reach the door ! "
But straight the answering finger cried,
"Three quarters left; and woe betide
If then you be not fast within
The portal doors ('twill be a sin
For which you'll pay the utmost price)."
He hurried on with heart of ice,
Wondering what must be his fate.
The seconds fled; he reached the gate,
And passed across the inner court
'Neath silent windows over-wrought
With metal grill of quaint device.
He trembled, for already twice
Had he been late that very Term;
And yet his ungloved hand was firm
As he wrenched ope the heavy door,
Unbuckling swift the coat he wore.
Then mockingly from overhead
He heard the faintly echoing tread
Of prefects going into hall,
He staggered 'gainst the lockered wall,
His brain slow reeling as the light grew dim,
And rising scenes of hell enveloped him,
With raging furies all about his head :
Then he awoke, bolt upright in his bed.

L. A. C.

Holiday Competition No. l.

THE MAGAZINE offers a prize of a book or books to the value of Seven Shillings and Sixpence, to be chosen by the winner, for the best answer to the following problem :-

On looking into the School a day before the beginning of the Summer Term, you find the walls newly painted in bright yellow and hung with choice pictures, most of which have been defaced and mutilated; the floors luxuriously carpeted and strewn with ink; the desks replaced by new leather armchairs, many of them broken and slashed with knives; and in one room a pile of straw burning, which, but for your timely intervention, would no doubt shortly have set the whole building ablaze.

Write the story of the incidents leading up to this remarkable state of affairs.

RULES.

  1. Attempts must be neatly written or typed on one side of the paper, and delivered at the School Office in a sealed envelope addressed to the Editor of THE MAGAZINE, not later than a 12.25 p.m. on SATURDAY, MAY 2nd.
  2. Competitors may use a nom-de-plume if they wish; in that case the competitor's real name must be given in a sealed envelope placed inside the envelope containing their story.
  3. The Competition is open to present members of the School only.

Football.

"UNDER 14" XI.

OWING to the dreadful weather only two of the matches arranged have been played. The first, against Chesterfield, was won; the second, against Doncaster, was lost.

RESULTS.

February 1st.-King Edward VII School "Under 14" v. Chesterfield Grammar School "Under 14" (away) Won 6-1

February 8th.-King Edward VII School "Under 14" v. Doncaster Grammar School "Under 14" (home) Lost 2-4

HOUSE LEAGUE.

1ST XI.

         

Goals

   
 

P.

W.

L.

D.

For

Agst.

Pts.

Position.

Haddon

7

7

0

0

102

9

14

1

Welbeck

7

6

1

0

60

17

12

2

Lynwood

7

5

2

0

51

19

10

3

Clumber

7

4

3

0

37

46

8

4

Chatsworth

7

3

4

0

29

29

6

5

Arundel

7

1

6

0

32

66

2

6

Sherwood

7

1

6

0

16

53

2

7

Wentworth

7

1

6

0

7

93

2

8

2ND XI.

         

Goals.

   
 

P.

W.

L.

D.

For

Agst.

Pts.

Position

Welbeck

5

5

0

0

42

1

10

1

Haddon

5

4

1

0

42

6

8

2

Chatsworth

5

4

1

0

48

7

8

3

Lynwood

5

3

2

0

19

23

6

4

Clumber

5

2

3

0

19

27

4

5

Arundel

5

1

4

0

15

43

2

6

Wentworth

5

1

4

0

8

46

2

7

Sherwood

5

0

5

0

3

45

0

8

3RD XI.

         

Goals.

   
 

P.

W.

L.

D.

For

Agst.

Pts..

Position

Chatsworth

5

5

0

0

60

3

10

1

Welbeck

5

4

1

0

61

9

8

2

Haddon

5

4

1

0

62

10

8

3

Lynwood

5

2

3

0

8

18*

4

4

Arundel

5

2

3

0

11

63

4

5

Clumber

5

1

3

1

11

32t

3

6

Wentworth

5

1

4

0

8

44

2

7

Sherwood

5

0

4

1

9

49

1

8

*Won one match by default.

t Lost one match by default.

THE 1ST XI.

The 1st XI has had a disappointing Term. Half the matches have been cancelled, and others were played in atrocious weather. The Falcons once again spoiled our unbeaten record, and thoroughly deserved their fine win. The results of the season were as follows :-

Played.

Won.

Drawn.

Lost.

Goals.

16

13

2

1

113-36

 

Mr. Saville's XI

won 8-4

Rotherham Grammar School

drawn 2-2

Doncaster Grammar School

won 9-4

Derby School.

won 17-0

Repton School

drawn 4-4

Sheffield Club.

won 11-3

Bootham School .

won 3-2

Old Edwardians

won 8-3

Lincoln School .

won 9-1

Sheffield Falcons

won 5-2

Lynwood Old Boys

won 4-3

Yorkshire Outcasts

won 3-1

Chesterfield Grammar School

won 13-1

Sheffield Falcons

lost 2-5

Huddersfield Amateurs

won 3-0

Bootham School

won 9-1

I do not propose to criticise individual players in detail. The team played magnificent football on its best days and it would be utterly invidious to give special praise to any one member of a well-balanced and skilful side. We shall be losing many of our veterans this year and we shall have to begin building a new team. J. W. Settle, E. W. Sivil, R. Gray, W. S. Gray, and F. Melling have been the backbone of our side for so long that it will seem strange to see the School playing without them. But there are many excellent young footballers in the School and I have no doubt that we shall find that they develop amazingly next year.

E. G. S.

K.E.S. 1ST XI v. CHESTERFIELD GRAMMAR SCHOOL 1ST XI.

Played at Whiteley Woods on Saturday, February 1st. Since the matches, against Firth Park and Chesterfield Grammar School (away) had been cancelled, this was the first match of the Lent Term. The pitch was in good condition and the weather perfect. The visitors won the toss and elected to play towards the brook, so that the School kicked off. The game began fiercely, with a rush on the Chesterfield goal, which resulted in Gray, R. heading a goal from a perfect corner by Sivil, V. R. Pressure was maintained and Gray, R. was enabled to score twice more, and Gray, W. S. and Sivil, G. B both scored. At this point the Chesterfield defence stiffened considerably and some clever work was witnessed; yet before half-time, Melling, F., Gray W. S. and Gray, R. all scored again. Until after half-time, the Chesterfield. School never looked like scoring, for the School defence seemed impervious to all attacks. Half-time : School 8, Chesterfield 0.

Shortly after the resumption, Gray, R. scored again but the visitors began to attack more strongly and Stevens the Chesterfield half-back who had displayed fine football throughout the game gave the K.E.S. defence an anxious few moments by shooting a pile-driver from twenty yards' range which just hit the cross-bar. Nevertheless, Gray, W. S. and Gray, R. both scored again before the opponents opened their score from a free-kick inside the penalty area. With only a few moments to go, Gray, W. S. and Melling, F. both scored, bringing the final score to 13-1 for the School. Chesterfield played a fighting game, although obviously outclassed, and on several occasions outwitted the backs, although to no purpose. The K.E.S. forwards started brilliantly, and throughout the game displayed clever passing and good shooting.

Result : School 13, Chesterfield 1.

Scorers : Gray, R. 6, Gray, W. S. 4, Melling, F. 2 and Sivil, G. B. 1.

K.E.S. 1ST XI v. SHEFFIELD FALCONS F.C.

Played at Whiteley Woods on Saturday, February 8th. The ground, which was frozen hard, was covered with two inches of snow and as a result play was difficult and dangerous. The Falcons, whom the School had beaten in the Autumn Term by five goals to two, fielded a heavier team than the School's, and seemed to be more at their ease under wintry conditions than the School XI. K.E.S. kicked off and for half an hour the game was fairly evenly contested, although neither team showed much enthusiasm. At that point the Falcons definitely gained control of the game and scored, making the half-time score 1-0.

After the resumption of the game the Falcons again got control and in the first 20 minutes of the second half, scored three more, bringing their score to four. The School here began to display a little of their usual dash and, probably aided by the fact that the Falcons were tiring a good deal, Gray, R. scored from a brilliant pass from Settle, which only needed deflecting slightly. Encouraged by this success, the School maintained the pressure and Melling, F. also scored. Unfortunately, the School again relapsed, and shortly before time the Falcons again broke through and scored.

Score : Falcons 5, School 2.

Hampered a good deal by conditions, little clever football was displayed, vet it was pleasing to witness the School's one burst of activity.

Scorers : Gray, R. and Melling, F.

K.E.S. 1ST XI v. HUDDERSFIELD AMATEURS.

Played at Whiteley Woods on February 22nd. Before the game started there had been a snowstorm and the field was covered with a thin coating of snow, rendering it very treacherous. The School won the toss and kicked towards the brook. At first play was very scrappy, as neither team was able to keep its feet properly, but after about ten minutes' play, the teams settled down and it was obvious that the School was entertaining a fast and clever team. Neither forward line showed any clever combination, and as the defence of both teams was exceptionally sound, neither goal got into any great danger, but on one occasion Gray, W. S. got the ball, beat the opposing right full-back with his speed, shot, but hit the cross-bar, with the goal-keeper beaten. Play remained in mid-field and when half-time arrived neither team had scored a goal, a thing very rarely witnessed at Whiteley Woods.

When play resumed, with the School kicking towards the wood, Huddersfield re-arranged their team, but even then they were unable to break through the School defence, which was playing as well as it ever has done this Season. Sivil, E. W., at right-back, was playing an inspired game and the visitors left-wing got little opportunity to cause any danger to the School goal.

It was about 20 minutes after the resumption that the first goal of the match was scored, Melling, F. heading it for the School. This goal put new life into the School and a second was scored shortly after, Gray, R. heading in off a beautiful centre by Gray, W. S.

The School was now definitely on top and Graham, G. A. added the School's third goal. He got the ball about 25 yards from the goal, hesitated, and then spurred on by the enthusiasm of the "touchline" shot, and scored, with the goal-keeper completely beaten. Huddersfield than rallied and spent the rest of the game round the School goalmouth, they were, however, unable to score and the result stood at 3 goals to nil in favour of the School.

K.E.S. 1sT XI v. BOOTHAM SCHOOL.

Played at Whiteley Woods on Wednesday, February 26th. The School gained another victory by defeating Bootham School by nine goals to one, after defeating them three goals to two at Bootham. The School won the toss and kicked towards the brook. The ground was very heavy, but it was not long before both teams were playing excellent football, and for the first quarter of an hour neither side appeared the better. The School, however, scored the first goal. It came from a pass by Sivil, V. R., on the right wing, and was scored by Settle. Immediately afterwards Bootham equalised, with the best goal of the afternoon. The inside-left got the ball just past the half-way line, ran through the home defence and placed the ball well out of Saville's reach. The School were playing a very fine game, the wing-halves backing up the forwards very efficiently, and would have been leading at half-time, had not Gray, R. missed an exceptionally easy goal, from one of Sivil, V. R.'s centres. At half-time the score was one goal each.

Immediately after the resumption the School were on top, and for the whole of the second half Bootham never looked likely to score a goal. After about five minutes' play Sivil, G. B., put the School ahead, and just after, he added a third goal. Gray, R. scored the fourth goal from a centre from the left-wing by Gray, W. S., who added the fifth goal. Melling, F. scored the sixth then Gray, R. added two more. The ninth goal was scored by Sivil, E. W., playing at right full-back, who shot the ball from just over the half-way line. The Bootham goal-keeper played a very fine game and the score would have been much greater had it not been for his fine work.

Sivil, V. R., the School right wing, was also very good, and had full advantage been taken of his centre in the first half the scores would not have been level at half-time.

K.E.S. 2ND XI V. CHESTERFIELD 2ND XI.

Played at Chesterfield on February 1st. School lost the toss, and kicked off against a faint breeze. Almost immediately Ashford put the School ahead. However, Chesterfield swept down the field from the centre-kick, but Forrest managed to clear and, since the Chesterfield defence were scattered, the School forwards had little difficulty in taking the ball back to the Chester-field goal, and Fulford finished the movement by driving the ball hard into the net. The School now began to press hard, and White and Fulford scored in quick succession. A few minutes later Ashford scored twice and completed his hat trick. Then it was Chesterfield's turn to attack. Alan kicked off the goal line and Forrest had difficulty in turning the ball out for a corner. Before half-time Fulford scored again for the School; and so did Ashford, but he was given off-side. Half - time : Chesterfield 0, K.E.S. 7.

School were now kicking down hill, and it was not long before Ashford again scored twice. The Chesterfield goal was by this time under ceaseless bombardment. Pashley was the next to score and soon afterwards Ashford received a centre from White and with the ball in front of him he scrambled his way into the Chesterfield goal. Fulford scored the 12th goal, and, when Ashford had scored the 13th, our luck changed. Chesterfield made a clearance and their inside-forward taking the ball up the field made a long, high shot which dropped over Forrest's head into the goal. However, the School soon resumed their attack upon the Chesterfield goal, and Williams and Ashford added further goals. Just before the end of the game White took several corners from the right-wing, and from one of these Fretwell headed beautifully into the net.

The School worked as one: their passing was accurate and well-timed, and they finished off their movements very well in front of the Chesterfield goal.

Result: Chesterfield Grammar School 1, K.E.S. 16.

Scorers: Ashford 8, Fulford 4, Pashley 1, Fretwell 1, Williams 1, White 1.

K.E.S. 2ND XI v. BOOTHAM 2ND XI.

Played at York on February 26th. Bearing in mind the former success against Bootham, when the School won by 11 goals to 1, most of the team was confident of victory, but from the start, it became clear that Bootham was going to play all out. The game was therefore fought relentlessly, with the School attacking well. The Bootham goal had many narrow escapes from Ashford, Fulford and Williams, but it was for Pashley, D. to score when he was left unmarked. With half-time, the score was 1-0 to the School.

With the wind behind them, Bootham began to attack. The inside-right, after drawing Forrest out, shot into an empty goal. It now seemed as if the game would end in a draw, but Fulford, who had been rather quiet this half, now dashed through and shot so hard that the Bootham goal-keeper could not hold it, and the School became one up. Not many minutes after, Fulford pushed another one in, and time came with the School the victors by 3 goals to 1.

Scorers : Fulford 2, Pashley, D. 1.

Drawing by J. Lindsay (3B)
Drawing by L. A. Bond (3C)

Oxford Letter.

University College, Oxford.
12th March, 1936.

Dear Mr. Editor,

If it were my intention to write this letter in the good old way, I should begin, in the style of Lamb, by apologising for my miserable pen. And after this comfortable little quill-cutting, which the French are pleased to call our hypocrisy, but which we all know to be a foster-child of our savoir-faire, I should plunge into an orgy of proper names and a labyrinth of technicalities.

Omne ignotum pro magnifico. I should enliven my discourse with airy chatter of the O.U.D.S. and the O.I.C.C.U., `shovers' and Schools, the Radcliffe and rowing.

And then, gentle reader, prefacing some apt reference to the Augean stables, which at the moment I cannot call to mind (for as Hume so justly shows, what has not been experienced cannot be remembered), I should proceed ohne Hast, ohne Rast, to back-biting and scandal-mongering whose suavity and good taste would be a graceful tribute to my Almae Matres (yes, both of 'em). I might, it is true, be haunted by a gnawing fear (dull, distant, but insistent, like an incipient cancer) that for six or seven whole terms I shall be more written about than writing-that though John Coates may never remember, Taffy Evans, like the elephant, never forgets. Yet that I at least am no mere misanthrope should be proved by my anecdotal bouquets to my cronies and intimates being no less spicy than my dark hints of and gloomy forebodings for those less highly honoured.

Perhaps, if I were writing on a full stomach, and without a tutorial in the near future hanging over my head like what's-his-name's sword, I should let down lightly those Edwardians whom I have never seen up here-not even at Seventh Club meetings. Their no longer conspicuous absence should condemn them to old night; they are mostly scientists and such like. I should tell you next that Bloom rowed bow in a St. John's boat that went down six places in Toggers. But he really has nothing to crow about. My own boat, Sir, went down ten (sic, italics mine) which you may assure him is a record. I should not forget to tell you that Kirkham drops in on me-generally at meal times-and regales me with fruity little stories of the dissecting table; nor that Youens-this is hurting me as much as it will him-has turned successful pugilist; that since Mason joined the Eglesfield Choral Society the B.B.C. has cancelled its decision to have the end-of-term concert broadcast; that Macquillin has done three years' work in two terms; and that other alumni there are who have done two terms' work in three years.

If I were to sustain the good old vein, Mr. Editor, I should make great capital out of Boswell's room. Littered with rusty Zulu spears, stags' heads in an advanced stage of decomposition, busts of Caesar and books borrowed from me, it looks like a cross between the School greenroom and the British Museum. And then there is Wigfull. I think I should take you into my confidence about Wiggy; every time I see him presiding at the Seventh Club I think of those beautiful lines-

"And round about that good old man

Gather a multitude of boys,

Pure, honest, healthy, spick and span,

Fit to be sung by Alfred Noyes."

There is Brown, and there is Camm. To presume to do more than mention them with bated breath in whispering humbleness would be like playing cards in church. Yes, I think I should hurry on to Fletcher. For all his disarming ingenuousness, Horace has his Machiavellian moments; when he wants to borrow a bike, he goes gleefully to a member of the S.C.M.

After that, Mr. Editor, I should find that I had still to deal with four-fifths of the mushroom Merton colony. I might be compelled, albeit reluctantly, to tell you that I have seen Holloway drinking coffee in Nynee's; (Nynee's has just lost its proctorial license); that Wild is still hoping to beat Horace Fletcher at squash; that Pogson takes trips to Cheltenham; that Sentance is still reminding me that the Merton fire, so the press had it, took place in the "oldest college in Oxford." (Unfortunately I happen to know who rang up the press. Besides, the Pembroke strike and the Keble ghost have taken all the edge off the vulgar Merton publicity. One must admit that the fire was well-organised and a success-only dons' rooms were affected. But that does not alter the fact that Merton is a mere six hundred years old upstart, and that we in Univ. continue to pray for Alfred the Great).

Having told you, Mr. Editor, more than any decent man would want to know, and having shown you all the cats, pigs and skeletons that Oxford bags, pokes and cupboards have to offer, I should proceed as a logical consequence to tell you that there is no justice in the world, that I am a disillusioned and embittered man, and that Oxford's a lousy hole. It would be my bounden duty, I suppose, solemnly to warn the rising generation that it will do well to shun this city of expiring dreams. But the truth is, Sir, that I have no time to do any of these things. My second term ends in two days time, and I am still desperately preoccupied by my search for a Grouper. It really is too bad. I simply cannot face my second Vac. without a real live Grouper to talk about. I've met Rhodes scholars and atheists; free-love exponents and Anglo-Catholics; men the worse for liquor and others the worse for a public school education-but I've never, never, I've never seen an Oxford Grouper.

Do you think I should advertise ?

Yours, etc.,
W. J. SMITH.

Old Edwardians.

RUSSELL GREEN (1905-1912), has followed up his first novel, Prophet without Honour, with a sequel entitled Wilderness Blossoms (Nelson, 7/6) and further volumes dealing with the same theme and characters are promised. We wish every success to this latest addition to our "Saga "literature.

JAMES LONGDEN (1910-1918) has been elected President of the Sheffield, Rotherham and District Building Trade Employers' Association, an unusual honour for a man of his age, and a tribute, no doubt, as well to his own abilities as to the long and honourable history of the firm which has borne this family's name for four generations.

S. CADMAN SMITH (1920-1924), was married on July 30th, 1935, at Christ Church, Georgetown, British Guiana, to Miss Sylvia Gray. He is a member of the staff of Barclay's Branch in British Guiana.

C. F. HALE (1921-1927), was married at Leeds on January 1st, to Miss Marjorie Godfrey. The bride's father, the late J. B. D. Godfrey, M.A., was a Senior Master at K.E.S. between 1911 and 1918, and was afterwards Headmaster of Queen Elizabeth Grammar School, Mansfield. His death was reported in the MAGAZINE of March, 1935. C. F. Hale is Senior French Master at Coatham Grammar School, Redcar.

J. OWEN WYNNE (1922-1924), Lieut., North Staffordshire Regiment, was married on January 18th in Sheffield Cathedral, to Miss Cynthia Maurice.

P. W. YOUENS (1930-1935), has been awarded his Half-Blue for Boxing at Oxford. As far as we know, he is the first Old Edwardian to represent the University in this sport.

Old Edwardians Dramatic Society.

THE APPLE CART.
A POLITICAL EXTRAVAGANZA.
BY
George Bernard Shaw.

Pamphilius

R. FORREST MARSHMAN

Sempronius

JOHN RICHMOND

Boanerges (President of the Board of Trade)

RAYMOND BEALE

King Magnus

ALBERT GILPIN

The Princess Royal

WINNIE RICHARDSON

Proteus (Prime Minister)

GEORGE LAUGHTON

Pliny (Chancellor of the Exchequer)

KENNETH WALTON

Nicobar (Foreign Secretary)

BRIAN PICKERSGILL

Crassus (Colonial Secretary)

CEDRIC BELK

Balbus (Home Secretary)

ERNEST CRABTREE

Amanda (Postmistress General)

JOAN CADDY

Lysistrata (Powermistress General)

ELAINE MOBLEY

Orinthia

MOLLY EDWARDS

Queen Jemima

MARY BATEMAN

The American Ambassador

LESLIE MOORE

I WELL remember a lady of my acquaintance, a firm supporter of the monarchy and the established church, remarking, after she had seen a performance of "The Apple Cart," that Bernard Shaw seemed at last to have seen sense in his old age. By this she meant that the man, whom she had previously been pleased to call "a horrible creature," had seen the error of his ways, renounced his socialist heresies, and become a loyal supporter of the monarchical system of government. She cannot have read the play very carefully, still less its author's preface. Nevertheless, it would be interesting to know all the different impressions, which this play has made upon the people who have seen it; and there must be a considerable number who have come away wondering what exactly it is all about.

If the essential qualities of drama are the study of character and the effect of situation upon it, the "Apple Cart" is a most undramatic work. It is static throughout, and there is little progress in the action. There is no development of character; there is very little attempt even to create characters. The people in the play are simply lay figures, in whose real existence it is impossible ever seriously to believe, and the actors are little more than vehicles for one outburst after another of heated, though often brilliant, rhetoric. It might be said of Mr. Shaw, as Aristophanes said of Euripides, though in most respects the two dramatists are poles apart, that "from the opening speeches there is not an idle moment; masters, mistresses, maids, women, slaves, and hags all talk."

The play therefore depends entirely on the interest of the speeches and the thought which they contain; and the speeches in the "Apple Cart" are as forceful, vigorous and provocative as any in Mr. Shaw's plays, containing a strange hotch-potch of political and social satire mingled with pure farce. No one, who has read the play carefully, could maintain for a moment that it is a defence of monarchy. Monarchy comes in for its full share of satire. Nor yet is it a defence of representative government. The serious political satire of the play is all directed against big business. The sinister power of great commercial combines, like Breakages, Ltd., is the background of the whole action. It is Breakages, Ltd., which has the real power in politics; Breakages, Ltd., which makes and unmakes governments and dictates their policy while they are in power; Breakages, Ltd., which works the whole political system in support of its own vested interests, and before which King and Cabinet are both alike powerless. Nor can either break loose from the fetters which confine them. The satire of the play is satire directed against an economic system, which, by leaving the essential services of the country in the hands of great private interests, makes each successive government a puppet in the hands of the financiers, and denies it the political freedom of action, which in constitutional theory belongs to it. It is a noteworthy fact that in the "Apple Cart" it is a Labour Cabinet, which has been unable to resist the pressure of big business. The "duly constituted democratic ministers" are as powerless as the throne to resist Breakages, Ltd., which has enveloped both in a kind of cocoon and rendered both alike harmless.

A play which depends so little on character or situation, is a difficult play to "put across" to an audience, and the Old Edwardians are worthy of high praise for their productions of February 14th and 15th. They succeeded in achieving what is the most difficult thing of all to achieve with a play of this sort. They held their audience, and one never felt at any time that there was any lack of attention or any flagging of interest.

The most exacting burden fell upon Albert Gilpin, who played the part of King Magnus. It is a part which would tax the powers of the most accomplished actor and it is no disparagement of Gilpin's performance to say that he did not entirely succeed. In the long scenes with the Cabinet one was conscious at times of a slight sense of strain and he had not quite the subtle suavity which the part requires. I thought that he was best in the Orinthia scene, in which he appeared to be entirely at his ease. He is to be congratulated on his performance of an exceedingly difficult part.

As Boanerges, President of the Board of Trade, Raymond Beale gave a good performance. His hectoring manner at the beginning of the play which gradually disappeared as he basked in the sun-shine of royal flattery, and his sense of outraged decency at the unseemly wrangles of his fellow ministers were most amusing. An excellent touch was his appearance in the last act in the bowler hat and drab shapeless coat, symbolical of the beginning of his surrender to the respectable standards required by Breakages, Ltd.

The actor who takes the part of Proteus, the Prime Minister, has also a difficult part. George Laughton, made up to bear a striking resemblance to Mr. Ramsay Macdonald, was excellent, when he was arguing calmly with the King, but I thought that his diplomatic tantrums were hardly violent enough, and he did not entirely succeed in giving the impression, which Shaw intends to convey, that Proteus is as clever a man as the King himself.

The rest of the Cabinet were all adequate. Brian Pickersgill was suitably acid, and Cedric Belk as Crassus gave a good performance as the doddering old man, who was only in the Cabinet, because he was an agent of Breakages, Ltd. The two lady members were both good, but I thought that Miss Mobley might have let herself go more than she did as the earnest and intense Power-Mistress General, and Miss Caddy was hardly skittish enough at certain moments.

For Miss Edwards's Orinthia I have nothing but praise. She made a most unmanageable part come to life, and strutted and postured brilliantly, speaking the monstrous conceits, which the author has given to the part, as though she seriously believed every word of them.

The smaller parts were all well filled. Miss Bateman made a most charming queen and Leslie Moore's performance of the American Ambassador was an excellent piece of comedy.

G. S.

Old Edwardians Cricket Club.

I THINK every playing member is looking forward with delight to the coming season-it is unfortunate that once again we shall only be able to have one match each Saturday as our playing strength is not adequate for two full elevens. I would like to point out that unless boys from the School join us we shall have great difficulty in raising even one team in future years. At the Annual Meeting held on Monday, the 9th March, 1936, the Captains and Vice-Captains were appointed as follows:-

First Team J. T. Burdekin, C. Thirsk.

"A"Team H. T. Baldwin, T. G. Vernon.

The Old Boys who attended net practice at the School very much appreciate the services of Waghorn and consider the School is very lucky to have such an able successor to Smith.

R. G. BEARD,
Honorary Secretary.
(Hoole's Chambers, Bank Street, Sheffield, 1),

Junior School Football

Bad weather has seriously interfered with games at the beginning of each term; it was October before we first visited Whiteley Woods, and on only two Tuesdays of this term has play been possible there.

This apart, we have had a very successful season. The 1st XI, relying on lively forwards and halves, has won two, drawn one and lost two of its matches; the two defeats being against Birkdale. Last term also, they played almost every Saturday against lower forms and junior House elevens of the Middle School, without defeat; indeed generally winning handsomely. A 2nd XI match against Westbourne 2nd XI was also won.

The House Matches have provided the usual excitement and vigorous play; the Saxons proving to be -narrowly superior to the Angles, with Normans and Britons `nowhere'.

Results :-

 

1st.

2nd.

3rd.

1st.

2nd

3rd.

Angles v. Britons

2-0

0-5

2-1

4-3

3-8

0-2

Normans v. Saxons

3-6

0-4

2-12

2-9

0-9

1-1

Normans v. Angles

2-3

2-1

7-8

3-7

0-13

5-1

Saxons v. Britons

5-0

2-1

5-2

4-0

12-1

2-1

Angles v. Saxons

2-4

1-13

2-2

1-1

0-4

0-6

Normans v. Britons

3-1

3- 3

3-2

0-0

1-4

3-0

The Junior Cross-Country Run.

THE Junior Cross-Country Run took place on Tuesday, March 10th, over the usual course at Crosspool. The conditions were not good and the going very heavy, owing to the recent wet weather. 75 boys ran, 19 Angles, 21 Britons, 18 Normans and 17 Saxons, all of whom completed the course.

The winning house was Angles, 47 points; 2nd, Saxons, 67 points; 3rd, Normans, 73 points; 4th, Britons, 119 points.

Those winning points for their houses were :-

ANGLES.- Oliver, J. G.

1st (time, 17.5 minutes).

Collins, W. H.

2nd.

Butler, D. R.

7th.

Holles, T. T.

9th.

Jowitt, G. A.

10th.

Wreghitt, K. M. B.

18th.

SAXONS.- Stuart, W. A. 4th. Shaw, A. 6th. Jones, T. K. 8th. Simpson, A. H. 11th. Atty, J. C. 17th. Tasker, A. T. 21st.

NORMANS.-Harrison, J. G. 3rd. Cahill, B. R. 12th. Manterfield, K. C. 13th. Johnson, L. 14th. Smith, A. C. 15th. Thompson, R. S. 16th.

BRITONS.- Taylor, G. D. 5th. Gregory, N. B. J. 19th. Hevon, D. 22nd. Hill, J. A. 23rd. Hind, P. M. 24th. Pratt, A. E.26th.

The Chess Club.

THE season has been a rather quiet one, since there have been no matches with other teams. A competition among those members who desired to take part has resulted in the following scores to date :-

Player.

No. played.

Won.

Drawn.

Los

Points.

Barnes, C. C.

10

5

1

4

11

Blackhurst, A. N.

8

1

0

7

2

Blackhurst, J. N.

13

5

0

8

10

Burkinshaw, T.

17

1

0

16

2

Coldwell, D.

9

7

1

1

15

Coldwell, K.

4

0

0

4

0

Jones, D. M.

7

2

0

5

4

Green, A. J. R.

12

8

0

4

16

Kay, L. R

19

10

0

9

20

Shaw, J. S.

2

0

0

2

0

Mr. Redston

8

8

0

0

16

Mr. Whitfield

13

13

0

0

26

A comparison of the relative merits of these scores is not possible on account of the different numbers of games played. But, of course, it is the joy of the game that really matters.

Scouting.

WELBECK-WENTWORTH.

S SATURDAY meetings have proved as popular as ever, and have been well attended. Our meetings were rather badly interrupted at the beginning of the Term by various School functions, and as a result work has been rather patchy. We are delighted that P. L. Whatlin and L. Morgans have obtained their Grade "A" All Round Cords (6 badges), and that Holroyd and Parkin (Swifts) have obtained their 1st-class badge. The Swift patrol now contains four 1st-class Scouts-an excellent performance. We are trying to develop handicraft and encourage Scouts to learn to make things for themselves, partly because we are trying to get together funds to build our second Kayak, and partly because such work is a sound activity. The response has been rather disappoint-ing. Several boys have taken up Ju-Jitsu wrestling with enthusiasm and we have been fortunate to enlist the help of Mr. E. L. Moore as instructor. In the patrol competition this Term the Ravens, who were far behind last year, have leapt ahead and it looks as if they might win.

We are looking forward to the better weather and open-air Scouting. We hope to have a full attendance at the Whitsuntide Camp and at the Summer Camp, which will run from July 29th - August 12th.

WELWORTH.

CLUMBER.

This Term has been spent "just Scouting." Those who are now 2nd-class Scouts have broken the back of 1st-class badge work, and we have definite hopes of obtaining a few of these badges in the early summer. First Aid and Signalling tests have been passed, and Estimation is well advanced. Meanwhile, Tenderfeet have been busy with 2nd-class badge work. This progress has been made possible by Bolsover's welcome help.

Parents have rallied round and the construction of a canoe has been started. Pashley, J. H., with Mr. Helliwell as adviser, has also embarked on shipbuilding, so we can look forward to another Windermere Camp with pleasant anticipation.

Scott J. is now Second of the Stags, on Shakespeare's retirement.

Last Term's patrol competition was won by the Bulls. So far this Term, positions have been very close, the Hawks having a slight lead at present.

Wade and Parsons ran very well in the "under 14" Cross-Coun-try Run, to finish first and second respectively. Barton and Langley were also in the House team, so we hope to enter a strong team for the Association Runs which take place on the first Saturday of the holidays.

On going to press, we can report another success for Wade, who won the 1 mile handicap race last Saturday.

The programme for next term includes the Whitsun Camp and for those who are keen, other week-end camps. In the near future there is the Gloucester, Somerset and Wiltshire hike to think about.

CHATSWORTH-HADDON.

Our activities this Term have been necessarily indoor ones, as in the Lent Term the weather seldom permits any other. Considerable progress has, however, been made in signalling (especially Morse), and ambulance work and congratulations are due to Hepworth, Darley and Wharton on gaining the Ambulance Badge. We are also hoping to have more Wirelessmen and Signallers in the near future.

Those of us who turned up to steward at the City Hall during the Christmas Holidays for Grey Owl's Lecture were well rewarded, though not with the autographs which we desired.

Now that Spring has reached us once again, our thoughts are turned towards that greatest of all Scouting games-Camping. As last year, a hike has been planned for the Easter Holidays, by Mr. Hickox, Mr. Thomas and Mr. George Smith, in collaboration with other sections, though this time it is a more ambitious one. A fortnight's tramp in the Black Forest should be very enjoyable and we hope that the hikers will have ideal weather, and not get a themselves mixed up with any Nazi intrigues.

In spite of the very definite notices which have been posted as regards the Whitsuntide Camp, viz., that the whole troop will camp, as last year, at Kelstedge, how the troop will camp eventually has not yet been settled. There is quite a possibility that the Chatsworth-Haddon Section will spend the long week-end at Sodden. We hope for considerably better weather than the frequent downpours which tried unsuccessfully to damp our spirits at Kelstedge last year.

It is not too early to be thinking of a site for the Summer Camp, and though it appears that we shall be disappointed by not going to Ireland, we are nevertheless confident that Mr. Smith will find for us a site to suit us "down to the ground."

J. A F.

LYNWOOD-SHERWOOD.

This Term our activities have been mainly indoors, owing to the bad weather. A number of 2nd-class Scouts have passed the 1st-class Signalling Test, and should now be well on the way to gaining the Badge. From the amount of training we have had, there should soon be some more Ambulance Badges in the Section. Congratulations to J. M. Cotton on having gained his Swimmer Badge

With the holidays before us, many of us are thinking about future camps and hikes. Mr. Thomas and a few scouts are representing the Section in the Black Forest Hike. We wish them good luck and everything they wish themselves! The Whitsuntide Camp will probably take place at either Derwent or Kelstedge, and we expect a good attendance. The Summer Camp will be held in Pembrokeshire, on the coast, and with weather as good as we enjoyed last summer, it sounds attractive enough.

For the Junior Scout Cross-Country Run, we have a sound team, and we ought to achieve the same result as last year. The Seniors, sad to relate, are more infirm and less enthusiastic.

I must conclude with an urgent appeal for the early payment of subscriptions next Term.

BISH.

House Notes.

ARUNDEL.

Again we have had a very disappointing Football Season. The 1st XI, after a rather good beginning, suffered several setbacks, and finished poorly by allowing Sherwood, our humble rivals, to beat them by 11 goals to 1. The team itself has been very patchy. In midfield play has at times been very good, but in front of our own goal it has been of a very low standard-largely because little determination was shown. Likewise the attack has shown no initiative and forcefulness.

Limb has played some excellent games in goal, and has had every opportunity of proving his merits. Wheatley and Rollin deserve special mention, particularly for their gallant efforts in the match with Haddon. They are inclined, however, to keep the ball too long.

Owing to the bad weather, the 2nd and 3rd XI's have not been able to play all their games, but in those matches which have been played there has been a notable lack of keenness. There would be a better game and perhaps a better result (so far as we are concerned) if every boy in Arundel who is picked to play for his House, did so with a will.

Nor can the result of the Cross-Country give us any satisfaction. To some extent runners are born and not made, but we must not deceive ourselves by thinking that training is of little importance, and moreover we must not shirk a race because we believe that it is lost before it is run. This is, however, too often the case.

HADDON.

We have again had another brilliantly successful Football Season, which is not really surprising, when one considers that in the 1st XI there are only two players who do not play regularly for one of the two School teams. The 1st XI is head of their league for the third year in succession, and scored 102 goals against nine, only Lynwood and Welbeck escaping double figures. These results are not due to any particular individual players, but to general team work and spirit; praise is due, however, to those, who, when promoted to the 1st XI, showed the same spirit and quickly adapted themselves to their new sphere. The records of the 2nd and 3rd XI's, though not as brilliant as that of the 1st XI, showed that they contained a great deal of talent. It is possible that they would have headed their respective leagues had the fixtures not been curtailed, for their chief rivals Welbeck and Chatsworth would have had to play each other. Congratulations to G. B. Sivil on gaining his 1st XI colours, a reward he richly deserves.

The Cross-Country Run took place on Saturday, March 14th. We had ten runners in the Open Event and eleven in the Under 14. Haddon was fourth in the Open, the team being Collins 9th, Bland 12th, Ashmor 24th, Moffatt 27th, Fuller 30th and Lee 37th. The under 14 team (Townsend 10th, McKenzie, R. 11th, Jones, D. M. 18th, Shillito 24th; Hipkins 30th, and McKenzie, K. D. 32nd), was placed third. These performances were highly creditable and give rise to bright hopes of Haddon's prospects in running in a year or two.

The Sports have yet to be decided, and if all members of the House play their part as they should, we ought to have as good a chance as anybody of winning the Challenge Cup, even though we shall be deprived of the services of Gray, R.

LYNWOOD.

The House 1st XI finished the season third in the Football Competition after winning two out of the three matches played this Term. The first match, against Chatsworth, was won by five goals to two; the second was lost to Welbeck by two goals to five after a hard struggle, and the third, against Wentworth, was won by 18 goals to nil. The 2nd and 3rd XI's both finished fourth in their respective tables, which were both incomplete owing to the fact that each team had only played five of the seven matches.

Congratulations to the Lynwood Cross-Country teams on finishing third and fourth respectively in the Over 14 and Under 14 Runs. The Senior team was as follows : Williams 3, Haigh 7, Denman 10, Bowmer, H. 19, Hughes 29 and Mowat 34, making a total of 102 points. The Junior team was: Bagnall 6, Wincott 15, Denman 25, Smith, J. A. 29, Knight 37, Rhodes 39, Barnes 52.

Congratulations to Burley, W. A. on playing for the School 1st Fives IV, and to Saville, Graham and Siddall on playing for the 2nd IV. Finally, we wish the best of luck to all competitors in the Athletic Sports, and hope that the Sports Cup will once more return to Lynwood after its year's absence.

WELBECK.

We have had a very successful Term, with only one black spot to mar its perfection. That was our defeat by Haddon of 6-4, which, however, might have been a very different result if the ground had been less hard. Nevertheless, we are second in the House 1st XI table, first in the 2nd XI table and second in the 3rd XI table.

Our greatest achievement, however, was in winning very decisively the Senior Cross-Country Trophy, with a total of 75 points, Clumber being runners-up with 101 points. The individual positions of the Welbeck team were as follows : Fulford, J. M. F. 2, Byrne, J. G. 4, Settle, J. W. 18, Kay, L. R. 15, Widdison, J. A. 21, Wang, M. S. 25. We hope this is a favourable omen, and that we come out top in the Athletic Sports.

WENTWORTH.

The Football this Term has been no worse than we expected, but the 2nd and 3rd XI's might have managed better things. All three teams defeated Sherwood-our only win of the season-but the 1st XI went to the bottom of the table as a result of Sherwood's convincing defeat of Arundel. We did not excel ourselves in the Cross-Country run, but we had a large entry for the Under 14, including Longden, who was third. The Sports may bring us more success, especially from the younger members of the House. We are hoping that a large number of these will begin swimming lessons immediately after Easter, so that we may have a good entry for the Swimming Sports next Term.

Notices.

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