King Edward VII School Magazine.

VOL. VI.] 
JULY, 1930
[No. 7

Editors
P. ALLEN, G. N. ARNOLD.

Hon. Sec.:
Mr. E. F. WATLING.

CONTENTS.

Editorial

281

Cricket, 1930

311

Twenty-five

284

The Swimming Sports

316

Our Ancestors

284

Fives

318

10/25

288

Oxford Letter

319

Empire Day

288

Cambridge Letter

321

Speech Day

290

Old Edwardians C.C.

322

Valete

296

Personal

323

The Prize Essay —"Caricature"

297

Transitus Social

324

The Prize Poem —"Flight"

298

Serenity

325

Why the Road was up in Newbould Lane

299

A Simpler Story

326

Modern Poetry

300

A Short Lament

326

Death and Resurrection

304

The Library

327

The Rediscovery of Steetley

306

House Notes

329

Junior School Entertainment

309

Notices

332

Editorial.

WE have at length succeeded in producing two magazines in a term. With the increased support of contributors, we should be able to continue in this laudable achievement. Not without its significance is the new Box for Contributions which has been put in the Library ; robed in dazzling newness, and pleasing to the eyes, it has already justified its existence, and will continue, we hope, to prosper.

* * *

The results of the Scholarship Examinations at Sheffield University are always of particular interest to the School. This year we have just cause for pride ; and we congratulate the following boys on their success : E. G. TURNER, who was "proxime accessit" for the Earnshaw Scholarship ; R. T. GAUNT, who followed up his success of last year by winning an Edgar Allen "B" Scholarship of a value of £130 a year ; G. J. CUMMING and L. VALLANS, who were offered Town Trust Scholarships of £50 a year ; E. L. M. MILLAR and S. MILES who won Robert Styring Undergraduate Scholarships ; J. L. LINACRE who was awarded a Technical Scholarship ; and J. A. HOPKINSON and T. A. TAYLOR who both won Technical Studentships.

* * *

A space will be reserved in the next Magazine for criticism of the New Cover.

* * *

This term, despite the heat and a certain definite if reluctant tendency to work, has been interesting. Mr. Clay addressed the School on Empire Day, giving a discourse distinguished by sensible and lucid reasoning and by wit. The juniors held a successful day. which, beginning with a cricket match between the juniors and ,the Parents, ended with the very attractive entertainment of the "Rose and the Ring." The Swimming Sports have been held, with great success, the relay race between the School and the Old Boys being specially interesting and exciting. Speech Day has again been held in the School building, distinguished by the visit of Mr. John Buchan, and signalised by the fact that the School Orchestra accompanied the singing. Cricket has been going well ; a close finish for the House Championship kept interest alive to the end, and the Two Elevens have had some excellent struggles. Moreover, Newbould Lane has turned from an ordinary, peaceful thoroughfare into an extract from No Man's Land, nor does the damage appear that it will ever come to an end.

* * *

The appeal for more contributions is becoming hackneyed. At least we might ask that those who have reports to send in, whether of matches, events or clubs, should send them in good time, without the need for repeated urgings on the part of the harassed editors. And lest we should end mournfully, we would remind our readers that the summer holidays are not far distant.

* * *

The list of "leavers" on the Staff is this term a heavy one, and we shall have to take a regretful farewell of four of our valued friends, to whom we offer our best wishes in their future work.

Mr. Norvill has been appointed Senior History Master at Bemrose School, Derby ; Mr. Hilton goes to the post of Superior of Mathematics at Westminster Training College ; and Mr. Sumner to a Lectureship in Education at University College, Nottingham. But Miss Rose has chosen the best reason of all, and is leaving in order to be married ; may we offer her our congratulations and good wishes, and assure her that her going will leave a gap not only in distant regions of our Newbould Lane settlement ?

The School Collection this term was taken for the Children's Holiday Home at Fairthorn Green, and with the addition of the proceeds of the junior School Entertainment amounted to £37/15/0.

MR. SHEARER.

Quiet, inconspicuous, and by many almost unnoticed, was the retirement on July 1st of Mr. James Shearer, M.A., in the sixtieth year of his service to Wesley College and King Edward's. Little will be known by the present generation of the Classical master of 1870-1905, though many citizens of Sheffield could no doubt tell us something ; but even we of the latter days, who only knew him in the punctilious performance of little duties—the ringing of a dinner-hell, the tracking down of a missing desk-key—can still form some picture of the invincible personality which must have informed the prime of his teaching activities ; and if the tradition of thoroughness is still part of our School's character, we shall treasure even our own short recollections of such a monumental example.

We arc in the habit of sprinkling these pages somewhat liberally with congratulations to all and sundry. May we here offer them with special sincerity and affection ?—for they were never better deserved.

REV. V. WARD PEARSON.

A notable figure in the Sheffield educational world, and one of the most memorable of our ancestors, was the Rev. VALENTINE WARD PEARSON, whose death was reported in June last. Educated at Rotherham and Manchester, he first came to Sheffield as Chaplain to Wesley College in 1888, and three years later became its Headmaster. On the reorganisation of the Schools in 1905, lie was appointed Principal of the Training College, where he worked for 16 years. In 1912 he was Lord Mayor's Chaplain to Councillor Samuel Osborn, in 1917 President of the Literary and Philosophical Society, and in 1919 President of the Sheffield Teachers' Association. "He was a man of strong personality," one of his former pupils writes, "a fine preacher, a clever musician, and a notable athlete, who himself set an example that was in itself of inestimable value to the young people who came within the sphere of his influence."

Twenty-five.

TWENTY-FIVE years is not a great and venerable age, as schools go ; but it is a landmark, or a milestone, and one which should count for something in the life of a school, if it has any life, and in the development of its personality, if modern conditions of State-organized education leave any loophole for such a luxury. Fortunately we can say without hesitation that K.E.S. has both these attributes, and that its first twenty-five years have been years of sure and steady growth in every respect. Comparisons are dangerous ground, but if we may venture a guess, we should say that we arc at the present time as well qualified for all that matters in the title of public School as at any previous date, whatever Education Committees and Headmasters' Conferences may have to say. This may sound like the assurance of youth, and the older hands may question our facts. We know of coarse that there were great days in the past ; there were the great (lays of Lynwood, where the flower of school sportsmanship, in every sense, bloomed vigorously ; there were great days of hard work and happy comradeship in the O.T.C. ; and of course there were great days of record-breaking success in classroom and laboratory. But if some of these things have passed away, they have died as seed in the ground, only to promote further growth, and the harvest of our twenty-fifth summer, as the Headmaster's report on Speech Day abundantly testified, is as rich as any.

L. F. W.

Our Ancestors.

A Historical Survey.

THE value of a School today seems to be calculated, not by its worth and actual performance but by its antiquity, and there are many people who are quite ready to condemn or ignore a man because he has not been educated at one of the older Schools. Intolerance in these matters dies hard.

It is, therefore, not with the expectation of hearing three rousing cheers we announce that King Edward VII. School has now been in existence 25 years, for after all too many things happen in a quarter of a century nowadays.

It is true that K.E. VII. School started in 1905 in temporary premises in Leopold Street while the present building was being prepared for its reception in the following year, but this very fact coupled with the new name presented by the City Fathers has almost hidden the earlier history of one of England's oldest Schools.

Two Schools were amalgamated to form K.E.S., for the Royal Grammar School and the Collegiate School had already been joined together in 1884. These Schools were the Sheffield Royal Grammar School and the Wesley College, the latter School possessing the buildings which are in use today.

Of these the Royal Grammar School was the more ancient and its varied fortunes repay examination. To trace its beginning we have to go back more than three hundred years, which is a most satisfactory thing to have to do.

THE FOUNDER.

It seems that in 1604 a certain Thomas Smith (Gentleman) of Crowland in Lincolnshire (lied, and it was found that he had made a Will dated July 2nd, 1603 by which he bequeathed to the Town of Sheffield £30 per year "so long as the world should endure, for the finding of two sufficiently learned men to teach and bring up the young children there in Godliness and Learnedness, that is to say a Schoolmaster and Usher, the former to receive £20 per annum and the latter £10, to be elected by the Minister and twelve of the best and most worthy people in Sheffield and by them to be removed at pleasure."

The Executor of the Will was Bartholomew Martin and the lands settled by him for the providing of the £30 were in Leverington in the County of Cambridge. These were afterwards sold by the Governors and lands at Wadsley in Sheffield purchased with the money. We wonder what has happened to them now?

The citizens of Sheffield lost no time in applying for Royal Patents to James I, which were granted and bear the date of May 4th, 1604. These Patents declare that the King erects, creates, founds and establishes a School in the Town of Sheffield for the education of the youth of that town and parts adjacent to be called "The Free Grammar School of James King of England," and to consist of one Master, one Usher and of children and youth therein taught and instructed.

It will be observed that the Stuart King took full credit to himself for the founding of the School arid that Smith's name or Will was not even mentioned. It was not even an Act of Grace on his part but on the humble petition of his subjects, the Citizens of Sheffield.

To meet the cost of establishing the School, an assessment was laid on the whole parish in 1606 and £103 18s. 1d. was raised which appears to have been a larger sum than was required for the expenses of procuring the Patent and Commissioners Decree.

It will be noted that so far no premises had been allotted to the School, for Smith's Will of 1603 provided for the Masters' salaries only. The Church Trustees, therefore, granted to the Governors by Indenture dated March 3rd, 1619, "a messuage called the Schoolhouse with the garden and croft adjoining to be holden for 800 years at 1/- per annum rent." These School buildings must have been in existence before the date of the Patent, for they are represented in 1644 as then in such need of repair as to he uninhabitable.

They were probably demolished soon after that (late, for in 1648 new buildings were erected, part of the materials coming from the Sheffield Castle which had been wrested from the King's garrison in 1644 by the Parliamentary forces under Major-General Crawford. The Castle was finally demolished and made unfit for defence in 1648 by Act of Parliament.

The School-house Croft was a strip of land extending from Town Head to West Bar Green on which stood the Grammar School, the Writing School and the Writing Master's house.

Hunter's "Hallamshire" states that the first Headmaster was Thomas Rawson who died in 1645, but from other books of reference it seems that one John Smith was the first to receive payment from Thomas Smith's Will, for on August 1st, 1604, Bartholomew Martin the Executor paid him £20 before the lands were assured to the Governors.

THE CIVIL WAR.

Thomas Rawson, however, seems to have been John Smith's successor, and he held the post of Master when the tide of Civil War swept northward to Sheffield. He was in fact the hero or perhaps the victim of certain controversies into which Lord Fairfax was eventually drawn as mediator.

When the King's Forces advanced on Sheffield after reducing Rotherham, the citizens of Sheffield who had supported Parliament, being entirely without means of offence or defence, decided that discretion was the better part of valour and retired into Derbyshire. With them went Thomas Rawson.

During his absence Robert Stacey of Owlerton, whose duty it was to pay the Master his salary, retained £49 6s. 11 on the principle no doubt that Rawson not having been at his post was not entitled to it. Thomas Rawson, therefore, wrote to Lord Fairfax whose reply was as follows :—

"I desire Colonel Bright to cause the School Trustees to pay the sun petitioned for or else to see the refusers sent to me that they may give an account of their neglect." Stacey appealed against this giving reasons at same length, but received the following :—"I require the within named Robert Stacey upon sight hereof to pay unto the Petitioner the sum mentioned or appear before me or such as I shall appoint to show cause to the contrary. FAIRFAX." Lord Fairfax seems to have had the last word. Truly justice was swift in those days.

Let us return to the School. fn 1709 a house was built for the Head-Master with gifts from the Governors and others, and in 1766 £805 was raised by subscription, part of which was spent on repairs to the School and the remainder invested. The salary of the Headmaster was about £60 at this time. There were then about 40 scholars who enjoyed no privileges with regard to exhibitions at the Universities which were not common to the natives of Yorkshire in general. The seal of the School represented the youth and the sheaves of arrows, the old insignia of Sheffield, which is still a part of the Badge today.

In 1825 a further subscription was raised for building a new school in what is now St. George's Square, which was first opened on August 4th in that year.

THE COLLEGIATE SCHOOL.

It may be as well to say a little about the Collegiate School, whose buildings are still in use in Broomhall Park and form part of the Training College which was used as a Base Hospital during the War.

The first stone was laid by Lord Wharncliffe in 1835, and the School was officially opened in July, 1836, the first Headmaster being the Rev. Thos. Wm. Atelier, M.A. His successors were the Rev. G. A. Jacob, M.A., the Rev. W. S. Grignon, M.A., the Rev. F. D. Ward, M.A., and the Rev. G. B. Atkinson, M.A.

In 1849 there were 101 boys at the School and this number was maintained until the amalgamation with the Grammar School in St. George's Square in 1884.

The first Headmaster of the combined Schools, under the name of the Sheffield Royal Grammar School, was the Rev. Edward Senior, M.A.

WESLEY COLLEGE.

The Wesley College was opened on August 8th, 1838, and was, as the name denotes, a denominational school. It was considered one of the foremost schools of its kind in England and has an excellent record of successes. As the prospectus carefully explained, however, the School exerted no sectarian influence and was open to all creeds. Primarily a boarding school, boys were sent to it not only from all parts of England, but from abroad as well, and there were also a goodly number of clay boys.

The average number of pupils was 350 in all. The building has suffered practically no external alterations but much had to be done internally when the School was taken over prior to 1905.

To mention only a few of the changes, the Dining Hall was where the present Assembly Hall is to-day, the site of the Chapel is now the elementary laboratories and the dormitories are now classrooms.

An old print now in the possession of the Old Boys' Association shows the front of the building exactly as it stands to-day with the exception of the East and West doors on the ground floor.

The administration of the College was in the hands of a Council, the virtual head of the School itself being the Chaplain assisted by a Headmaster. This was changed in 1888 when the School was reorganised on public school lines and many more interesting features introduced with regard to physical education. In this year a Cadet Corps was formed and further playing fields leased. An Old Boys' Union was started, under the presidency of Dr. Dyson, the Secretary being Mr. Padley.

The new regime was introduced by Mr. J. J. Findlay, M.A. (now Professor) in 1888 and he and the Rev. V. W. Pearson carried on jointly until 1900, when the latter took over sole charge until the great change in 1903. It will be remembered that the Rev. V. W. Pearson died recently in retirement.

Most Old Boys of the present School and Wesley College will remember the almost historic figure of Mr. Shearer, one time Master of the Shell Form. After his life of active teaching, Mr. Shearer became Registrar of K.E.S., which position he held up to only a few clays ago when he retired after more than sixty years' service.

We have only attempted to give an outline of the three chief Schools in Sheffield. No mention has been made of the many boys who have made their mark since the first School was founded, but we hope that sufficient has been said to awaken a feeling of great pride in the history of Sheffield education, now vested in the present School which is still capable of maintaining the tradition of its ancestors.

Finally, we should like to acknowledge the interest and help of Professor J. J. Findley, Mr. J. Lomas Cockayne, Mr. Padley and Mr. Clay.

LEONARD BESWICK.

Empire Day.

ON Saturday, the 24th May, we listened to a rather unusual kind of Empire Day speech from Mr. Clay. At the beginning of his speech he deplored the fact that geographers had made a habit of colouring maps of the world in three arbitrarily chosen colours—red, yellow and green ; the British Empire was coloured red. He was unable to explain why red came to be chosen, for this colour was the least suitable of all. It was a mistake to consider the British Empire as one whole. It should rather be called the United States of the British Empire, because, though having independence one of the other, the component states usually managed to work in harmony.

The old British Empire was (lead. In former years Englishmen had gone out and developed these new countries. In the West inches she had developed the soft fruit trade, and the answer was literally a lemon. Now, however, the idea of dependence on the Mother Country was gone, and there remained a collection of independent states, united only by the intangible bond of similar sentiments. A new sort of British Empire was being formed, and it depended on the coming generation to see that it maintained its ideals. The English boy who was not proud of being an Englishman ought to be beaten with rods. A member of King Edward VII School ought to be proud of being first, a Sheffielder, then a Yorkshireman, and then an Englishman.

R.F.T.

10/25

CONTRARY to the usual procedure of the modern journalist, who, after having produced, with great difficulty, an unusual and perhaps striking headline, keeps his readers in suspense for whole paragraphs before giving the slightest idea as to why he has Selected the title, the writer hastens to inform all and sundry that, out of 25 years of progressive achievement that form the proved record of King Edward VII School, Sheffield, he has only an insignificant acquaintance with ten of them. Insignificant certainly is the word if it be admitted that to meet the majority of the boys for forty-five minutes only each week and the frequenters of the common room at more or less regular and brief intervals can be called acquaintance at all. Even then our vulgar fraction would more truly represent the writer's knowledge of the School were the "one" in its numerator omitted altogether.

There are certain things which even the most insignificant persons notice that are occasionally interesting to those more richly endowed, and the few following observations collected during a ten year's sojourn in Sheffield may, perhaps, serve to induce the condescending smile of the super-intellectual and raise the spirits of more ordinary folk.

As the writer has for ever severed his connection with the School, perhaps he may venture to be personal. Those who are anticipating something sensational will please read no further, for the word "personal" applies to one individual only, in this case the writer.

After a night and morning of prolonged war-time travelling and after an unforgettable interview with the late Head, Dr. Hichens, the writer was conducted round the School by Porter Pollard, of serious mind and affectionate memory. This gentleman, with pardonable pride, conscientiously indicated the purpose of every room and repeated the names both of its regular and occasional masters. With special emphasis the visitor was invited to notice the indescribable galaxy of tools and apparatus in the large room at the east end of the main corridor and afterwards to take a furtive peep at Young England in the "gym" below exercising with an eye to military prowess. But, these sights and the well groomed heads of hair that bobbed systematically up and down among rows of doubtful bottles in the rooms dignified by being called places of labour failed to impress in the presence of one, before whom all doors opened as if by magic, the possessor of a master key.

Some weeks after, on a fateful Thursday, other sights and sounds began to make more less permanent impressions upon the newcomer. Ere the freshness of the morning had faded, the memory became wearied with attempting to retain voluminous instructions and regulations, read and received with due solemnity ; and it was not until the writer's little mind repercussed with the recollection that it was impossible to retain all, and that occasionally it was safe to plead ignorance, that his breath again became normal,

Shortly after noon, two bunches of keys, tied with string which bore evidences of other uses, were placed in his hands, together with a time-table and an impressive looking mark book. It was while taking these to Room 64, that he made an observation that without exception, is made by every master, pupil, visitor, bidden or unbidden, welcome or otherwise, who ascends the western stairs. On the top step, perfectly impressed in the lasting concrete, is the MARK OF A DOG'S FOOT.

Instantly the standard interrogations, why, when, whose and how, clamoured for satisfaction and reason tried to curb their violence. One mark only, hence this must have been the only unset cement on the stair, or, the other steps were covered. 'It is natural to suppose that the animal had eagerly rushed up to his owner, who was 'one of many working on the conversion of the building from the residential character of Wesley College to its present condition.

Possibly the master administered reproof ; but he did not obliterate the foot-print. The dog, long since, surely has gone from the world, all unconscious of what he has done ; and he has done much. Hundreds have, when catching sight of this mark, had their overtaxed brains relieved, for the moment, of the pressure of accumulated facts. Perhaps, a canine friend at home springs in imagination to meet one ; or may be, 'an attentive dog awaits the sharp report of a sportsman's gun. At any rate, the mark has been noticed by thousands of young eyes that were and are looking confidently into the future and dozens of older ones that, perchance, are somewhat losing that youthful inspiration ; and it may safely be said that every boy, young or old, past or present, will like to be reminded of this accidental footprint, which has formed the nucleus of this wordy caprice, and which has come to be remembered with a sort of affection.

The writer appends a personal resolution:—

I'll drink to the hound,
Whose footprint is found
At the top of the western stair.

Those who prefer it can substitute "remember" for "drink to."

Boy writers, in school magazines, when mentioning the common room, are apt to sharpen their budding humour upon what they fancy that apartment is for and upon what they imagine goes on there, basing their observations upon a superficial acquaintance with a room occasionally in the occupation of prefects and filling in detail from pure imagination.

At the time of the writer's introduction to the common room at King Edward's, its condition on entering, suggested the inviting cosy character of a Southern Railway waiting-room on a suburban line. A big, bare, central table caught the eye, a long bench innocent of upholstery stood between the two windows, to the right was a large shallow cupboard, the contents of which during ten years have remained a mystery, and on the opposite wall a range of shelves invited the trusting new-comer to deposit whatever of which he wished to rid himself. A number of very hard seated, curved armed chairs completed the attractions of this privileged apartment.

But, this common room has associations quite apart from its accommodations ; associations that are among the most treasured that accumulate during life. Almost every master has a place at the table, near the shelves or windows, and during "break" he is usually found there doing something eminently characteristic of himself. Some talk, a few read, others glance at exercise books and, as every boy knows, five or six smoke.

This is the room where friendships are made, where masters chip off one another's rough excrescences, where, now and then, confidences take place and sympathies insensibly grow and gradually bind members of the staff into a more or less harmonious whole. No master can afford to absent himself habitually from the common room without losing this mutual understanding.

It was in this common room that the writer became acquainted with the staff and received numbers of impressions that to him were invaluable and the loss of which is felt, now that the place is but a memory and some voices that were familiar and pleasant to hear there, are for ever silent.

W.H.E.

Speech Day.

T HIS year's Speech Day was notable for several innovations, and for a remarkably fine speech by Mr. John Buchan. In the Golden Age the diversions of Speech Day included a recitation by the Head of the School ; we have even heard "What a Yorkshur fairmer thinks o' schulemaisters," or words to that effect. We much regretted that this exhibition of the School's oratory should have fallen into disuse, but now we are happy again. No one who came on Friday could have gone away without being impressed by our learning ; we were made one with the Ancients, and we applauded twice—each time apparently on the correct occasion. Although some of us may not have appreciated the niceties of the oratorical style, the Head of the School is to be congratulated on a very worthy performance. Perhaps the School would feel more at ease if in the future the Speech were to be published before, and not after its delivery.

Mr. Buchan may not have understood every word of the Latin Oration, but its general effect was to inspire him to give of his best in a more comprehensible language. Before he stood up many wished that he would follow his natural bent, and tell a story, but Mr. Buchan's speech left no room for regrets. Unlike so many of the Speakers who come to us on Speech-days, he did not take the prize-winners for granted and devote his talent to the task of sympathising with the less fortunate majority (boys of character, of course), who had not won prizes. Mr. Buchan has his own, very definite opinions on character, and his remarks on the "Aristocracy of brain" were all sound sense, and well worth remembering.

The singing of "Sursum Corda" after the prize giving was better than most of our previous attempts on Speech Day, and the innovation of the orchestra playing in the gallery was a great improvement both in appearance and in effect. With an orchestral gallery and a Latin Oration, Speech Day is becoming a much more splendid ceremony than before.

The Gym Display on the grass in front of the School was another happy inspiration—a welcome change from the purely scholastic atmosphere in the Hall. We have seen little of a Gym Eight in recent years, but they gave such a fine show on Friday that it will be a pity if they do not appear more frequently in future. They added one more attraction to an already successful Speech Day.

THE SPEECHES.

The Chairman, Councillor R. H. Minshall, welcomed the visitors and Mr. JOHN BUCHAN.

The HEADMASTER, in his report said that in the last seven terms seven masters had obtained promotion in the profession from this school. which meant that though they lost some able men, they also attracted others. The School was winning a reputation as a stepping stone, which he regarded as thoroughly healthy and satisfactory.

"I must also refer," he said," to one who has left the school for an honoured retirement. Just sixty years ago Mr. James Shearer, graduate of Aberdeen, his native city, came to this building to be a master of Wesley College. In time he rose to be second master, and later, when that amazing marriage took place between an ancient Grammar School and a denominational Boarding School, he remained, though over sixty years of age, to do yeoman service to Mr. Hichens as Registrar for the new-born school. His retirement three days ago marks the passing of a School institution and the end of a tie that has bound us to one of the famous schools from which we spring. I should like to take this opportunity of telling the Old Boys of both schools that many other ties still bind us to them and that in this twenty-fifth year of our age we are as proud of our parentage as we are hopeful of our posterity"

Referring to the "increasing enterprise shown in the holiday making of our boys," the headmaster mentioned the Winchelsea camp, the "holiday exchanges" with Germany and France, and the Scout camps in Cornwall, Algiers, Switzerland, and elsewhere.

"These expeditions at home and abroad develop self reliance and enterprise among the boys, help them to 'Be prepared' for a world in which the nations are less separated than ever before, and give them the best of good times into the bargain."

"Before I come to those comparatively measurable achievements that are printed on the Honours Lists, I wish to make sure that in so doing I give no false impression of the real aim and purpose of the School. My view is that though all these things have their importance, it is not for them that the School is here, nor are they from year to year a quite reliable guide to the quality of our service. A school exists to aid boys in the difficult and sometimes painful process of growing up. The tasks both mental and physical which it imposes upon them are those which, after long experience, the human race has found most useful in developing the bodies and minds and spirits of the young. The real measure of the School's success is how well or how ill it performs this function. Thus the pride of the School is not in paper results, but in the grown men who are her sons. If the possession of a certificate or of a scholarship is a sign of unconscious growth and of conscious healthy effort, then we can congratulate ourselves on it. But no one knows better than the schoolmaster what a danger to real education the pursuit of certificates and distinctions may be. This modern danger of over-emphasis on examination results, a danger which comes mainly from outside the schools, is that it will drive teaching along the unintelligent line of direct cramming which will improve the statistics without improving the boy. I can assure you, sir, and this assembly, that King Edward VII. School, in spite of its fine past and present record in examination results, will always aim first and foremost at an intelligent education."

The certificate results of last summer were as follows : 60 School Certificates were gained, the average number over the previous ten years being 52.2 Higher Certificates numbered 32, with 10 Distinctions against 29 with 11 distinctions the previous year. Six boys had won Scholarships at Oxford and Cambridge, a number only once exceeded in the history of the School in 1915 and once equalled in 1926 ; while at Sheffield University six scholarships and two studentships had been gained.

"Proud as the School is of these honours won at Oxford, Cambridge, and Sheffield, it is prouder still of the boys who have won them. They go on with our full confidence that they will by personality and character as well as by intellectual qualities repay what has been done for them here by bringing credit to the name of the School. For the good things that have been done during the School life of these boys, both inside and outside the classroom, it will, I am sure, be obvious to all that the chief credit, and very great credit it is, is due to the able and devoted Staff by whom the School has the good fortune to be manned."

The SENIOR PREFECT (E. G. TURNER) welcomed Mr. Buchan in the following words : "Mihi vero cordi est, hospites, hoc pensum suscipere, quod et feriae hae maximi sunt momenti et de fortissimo viro agitur. Hoc enim munus mihi est propositum, pro universis vobis, vel hospitibus vel huius domus magistris et alumnis, brevi et concinna oratione hospitem hunc nostrum, amplissimum atque ornatissimum virum, Johannem Buchanum, salutare, qui summa nostra laetitia, summo gaudio hodie adest. Omnes enim hunc olim meminisse iuvabit, nec minime quod Johnsonianum illud tam Clare confirmat—id dico in quo plurimum valere posse affirmavit hominem Scotum "si admodum adulescentem deprehenderis." Certe hic noster, adulescens deprehensus, se plurimum valere hand dubie ostendit. Nam quis alius inter aequales ingenium tam versatile praebuit ? Huic enim gladius tam proprius quam stilus, et duae inter se contrariae artes, militaris et scholastica, in eum unum sunt coniunctae. Nec modo rerum antiquarum, verum etiam novissimorum temporum studiosus est ; adde quod senator, praetor, aerarii academici apud Oxonienses curator, sodalitatis Alpinae socius, maximi Scotici Librarii praefectus est ; scriptorem denique se valde bonum, cum rerum, tum fabularum, praestitit : aliis etiam rebus praetermissis nullo modo fieri potest quin vir amplissimus esse videatur. Sed quid omnes has virtutes singulas enumero ? En vir ipse adest. Ipse mox verbis suis contionatus qui et qualis sit ostendet. Quid igitur pluris opus est ? Non sit mea culpa si, ut ait ingeniosus poeta "Sudat in sedilibus Populus confertus." Di meliora! Repetam modo quod in principio praedicavi, summo omnis cuiusque gaudio hodie salutare nos hospitem nostrum, arrectis omnes auribus quid allocturus sit exspectare, neminem denique non sincero animo gratias tam clarissimo viro tanta pro comitate agere."

Mr. BUCHAN said : Mr. Chairman; My Lord Mayor, Ladies and Gentlemen and Mr. Turner, I am not going to attempt to reply to Mr. Turner in the language of which he is such a master, because unhappily I pronounce such Latin as I remember in the Scotch fashion and not even Mr. Turner, I fear, will understand me. (Laughter). Like Mr. Turner I want to begin with congratulations. I should like to congratulate you heartily upon the most distinguished record of a year's work as shown by the Headmaster's wonderful report. I should like to congratulate you upon being up here on a hill top, the right kind of place for any academic institution. To my mind all such places should provide a prospect for the eye as well as for the mind, and I warmly congratulate you on being here in the city of Sheffield, for I firmly believe that there is a great deal to be said for having an academic institution in close contact with a busy city and above all, having such an institution closely linked to the city's life. I always think that half the strength of my own Scottish Universities comes from the fact that there you do not cultivate the muses in the academic retirement that you get at Oxford and Cambridge but you have always got a very real and bustling world next door to keep you from pedantry.

Having offered you my congratulations I wonder what I am going to say next. I am told that I am here to give you advice since I have reached a venerable age and may be supposed to know a little more about the world than you do. Well, I am not very good at giving advice. I would much rather tell you a story. Since I am here for the purpose and since Mr. Turner has invited me I am going to say something to you this afternoon which some of you may regard as a paradox, but which I believe to be true. Now in my time I have been to a great many speech days and it seems to me that the kind of note struck is always the same. Some eminent man, a politician or a captain of industry, or a soldier who is either an old boy or a distinguished visitor, comes and explains to the audience the secrets of his own success, and he is always very modest about his intellectual attainments. He always implies that he attained his position not so much by brain as by character and he generally finishes by saying that the glory of the English school is to produce character and that it is only character that matters. Well, there is a great deal of truth in that, but I think it is rather one-sided advice and may conceivably do a certain amount of harm. You see, none of us really like brains. We do not choose our friends for their brains but for their kindliness or their courage or their humour. There is a deep ineradicable suspicion of cleverness in the human race. The other day I went to a little public school in a very remote part of the Cotswolds. It was a new school, I think a little younger than yours, and I was very much struck by one sentence of the founder.. He said that the School had been created for one purpose only—to manufacture aristocrats, and he said further that there is only one aristocracy among human beings and that was the aristocracy of brains and character. Well, now, I think that is a fine ideal. I think that you cannot have a better purpose than to become aristocrats, which means the best and most useful people in the world, but if you are going to do that you must remember that there are two sides—character as well as brains, and brains as well as character.

About a year and a half ago we celebrated the tercentenary of a very great Englishman, John Bunyan, a man who had his roots very deep in English life. In his great book he drew many types who are still living to-day, and in particular he has drawn many wonderful figures of fighting men—and remember in one sense or another all of us have got to be fighting men. But there is one remarkable thing about Bunyan's fighting men. They are never mere swashbucklers. They never fight merely for fighting's sake. Mr. Greatheart, Mr. Valiant-for-the-Truth, Mr. Standfast are all people who use their heads as well as their hands. Mr. Bunyan has drawn pictures of the other kind. There is Mr. Anything, for example, who is said to be a brisk lad in a broil but no good to any side, and Mr. Haughty, in The Holy War, who said he did not care on which side he fought.

Mr. Haughty was duly and properly hanged. Even when Bunyan draws a good man, —an honest man who is rather stupid—he never makes him a leader. He makes him a follower who has to be helped along a great deal. There is the delightful character of old Honest. Honest says Bunyan, came from the town of Stupidity which is five degrees beyond the City of Destruction and five degrees further away from the Celestial City. Bunyan had no admiration for an empty head, even when it was joined to an honest heart.

Now, ladies and, gentlemen, you will often find people talking about our English race as if the only thing we had was character. They say that we are not as clever perhaps as our neighbours but that we have a wonderful character and it enables us to muddle through in the end. I believe that to be absolutely untrue. No man woman or child ever muddled through anything in this world. What I think you can say about our British race is that we are apt sometimes to be a little slow off the mark, to be rather late in starting, but we learn our job as we go along and usually end by being rather more efficient than our rivals. In the war we started with a small and poor general staff compared with the other combatants and with practically no intelligence service. We ended by having a general staff equal to any other and by far the best intelligence service in the world. Surely that does not look like muddling through. You will remember all of you the old fable of the hare and the tortoise, how they started a race. The hare went to sleep at the starting point and the tortoise plodded on and got there before the hare. Well, I think that fable has had a rather sinister effect upon our nation. * It has tended to make us believe that it is "dogged as does it," or rather that it is only "dogged as does it" whereas, as a matter of equal fact, no amount of patience and perseverance without intelligence can ever compete against intelligence properly used. I have read an American version of that fable which I commend to your attention as a better version than that of the popular form. The American version is that a hare and a tortoise started a race. The hare went to sleep at the start and the tortoise plodded on. After about five hours of refreshing slumber the hare awoke and observed the tortoise hearing the goal.'' She roused and shook herself put forth her best efforts and won the race comfortably with a great many yards to spare. It does not do to presume. upon the possession of gifts, but neither does it do to presume upon the possession merely of character.

I suppose that most of you or all of you when the Great War ended were very small people and what you know about it you have only heard from other people. I hope you are interesting yourselves in it, for it was a very great national effort and though war is an abominable thing, which I hope will soon be driven from the world, yet it is an extraordinarily illuminating thing and very interesting in its parallels to civil life. Now one of the lessons of the War was that character without brains was a very futile thing and terribly costly. Again and again well meaning, honourable, but stupid generals flung troops against impossible places. These troops gave the world a lesson in fortitude and fidelity but we paid a terrible cost for it.

A great writer of the War has said that the battle should always be won in the general's mind and that a true contest is against the enemy's mind and not against the bodies of his troops. We won in the end because we realised that, because we used our brains better than our enemies and because we realised the truth of Napoleon's great saying that in war the moral is to the physical as three to one, and by "moral" Napoleon meant mostly brains.

The fact is, ladies and gentlemen, there is no real final distinction between brains and character in their practical value, and those who make a distinction do not properly realise the meaning of either word. Intelligence, brains, wisdom, is far more than mere surface cleverness which I agree is very futile. The true fighting man, as I have said, must at the same time be a thinking man and must not only be prepared to fight for his cause but must fully understand the cause for which he fights. This afternoon I want to invite your admiration, not for the honest, stupid fellow, and not for the ruthless, specious, clever man but for what I like to call a moderate—what Bunyan would call a soldier of grace. Youth is not supposed to be greatly interested in moderation. That is supposed to be left for disillusioned middle-age. Youth wants to take the Kingdom of Heaven by storm. Its power lies in its enthusiasm. It is perfectly right that you can do nothing in the world without enthusiasm, but there is no reason why the moderate should not be also the enthusiast. The moderate takes infinite care to understand the cause for which he fights, but having found it he loses himself in it and it becomes the most formidable thing in the world, for behind him are the powers not merely of passion and emotion, but also of reason.

What characterises the true moderate ? Well, in the first place he must keep his mind bright and clear. He must have the intellectual courage to ask questions and insist upon the answer. That is the only way to progress for the world will always be filled up with a great deal of rubbish and unless you burn it now and then in an autumn bonfire it will impede the living growth. In the second place the true moderate has that moral courage that we all talk about and rarely understand. I mean by that, he is prepared if necessary to go against the crowd. As you grow up you will hear people talk grandly about "sticking to your side" and backing your party, and being dogmatic about the most delicate uncertainties. It seems to me that that kind of blundering courage is not very hard to attain to. It only requires rather blind eyes and rather a hot head. There is far more real courage in insisting on bringing facts up against your creed and examining it by the light of them even if it compels you apparently now and then to be inconsistent. A recent Viceroy of India said a thing that I regard as a profound maxim of all public and private conduct. He said, "No man is so strong as a man who is not afraid to be called weak." I wonder if in reading the Sermon on the Mount you have been rather puzzled. by one of the beatitudes : "Blessed are the meek for they shall inherit the earth." It sounds a startling paradox. Inherit the earth ? The Kingdom of Heaven perhaps but surely not the earth. The earth is supposed to be the heritage of the strong and the violent, the people with the shining swords, but I believe that beatitude to be literally true in the most practical sense of the word. The hot-heads and the violent people make a great stir in the world. They make revolutions to alter the faces of the world but when they have passed like a meteor the moderates come along and clear up the muck. The meek and the moderate inherit the earth in the most literal sense, for to them is due every stage that we attain in the progress of humanity.

We are not living in easy times to-day. In a few years you will all have left the sheltered backwater of school and will be out in the main current. I am afraid you will find it a very turbid current. The world is full of new problems, urgent problems and difficult problems. Now these problems will never be settled by mere ruthless cleverness, but they will never be settled either by honest stupidity. Character is the greatest thing in the world but is must be illuminated and guided by intelligence, and the glory of our English schools is not that they merely specialise in character but that they insist on mental and moral development going hand in hand, : for one is impotent without the other. Their motto and your motto should be those words of Shakespeare in "Hamlet" : "Bless'd are those whose blood and judgement are so well co-mingled."

I go back to what I said at the beginning. You are a long descended institution but in one sense you are a comparatively new school. That means that you are not clogged up with too much useless lumber. It means that you yourselves have in great part the making' of your own tradition in your own hands. I commend to you that phrase which I heard in that lonely part of the Cotswold Hills, and the true aim of education is the manufacture of aristocrats and that the only aristocracy among men is the aristocracy of character and brains.

After the distribution of prizes, the Hymn "Sursum Corda" (by H. M. Butler) was sung, and votes of thanks were proposed by the LORD MAYOR and Alderman E. G. ROWLINSON.

The principal prizewinners were :
E. G. Turner, Classics and Ancient History ;
C. Wigfull, W. P. Taylor Mathematical Prize ;
D. W. Burley, Chemistry ;
R. T. Gaunt, Physics ;
E. Laughton, Classical Composition and English Poem ;
P. Allen, History, Modern Language Essay, French, German ;
R. H. Williamson, Spanish ;
I. G. Philip, English and English Essay Prizes.

Valete.

You that have loved the golden days
Ere starting on life's broader ways,
Lift up with us, before you part,
A joyful and a thankful heart.

Give thanks for long-enduring wealth
Of light and laughter, joy and health,
For helping hands of honest friends
In toil employed to noble ends.

Give thanks, if in high hopes and aims
In zealous work and manly games,
In comradeship of young and old,
You found imperishable gold.

And if in all your battles here
Your heart was true, your conscience clear,
So, when you arm for sterner fight,
Still keep your steely armour bright.

And where the ways of life are rough
Let this remembrance be enough
That, here, beneath King Edward's seal,
You bore the true untarnished steel.

The Prize Essay.

" CARICATURE,"

A CROWD will always gather to see the unveiling of a statue. At a stroke the wrappings are jerked off, and instead of an uninteresting mummy, we see the figure of a man.. Caricature is a kind of ultra-unveiling, and a far more interesting study. We know the physical form of a man only too well ; we accept' it, and think little about the matter. The caricaturist goes deeper than this, and lays bare the real man beneath the outward form. Caricature does not consist in the sketching of politicians with large heads and small bodies, for that is mere mechanical distortion. If a man has a large nose, it is an easy matter to exaggerate it, but if that same nose is not his striking characteristic, the exaggeration is abortive. Some idiosyncrasy in the mind might give him his real individuality, and the true caricaturist must have the imagination to probe the mind of his subject, and the skill to reveal it in his drawing.

Man is made up of carefully proportioned elements of good and evil. He is a power girt round with weakness, and Angel and Devil have joint holdings in his soul. Some detail 'in the faces of most of us gives a hint of flaw or failing, and when that detail is exaggerated the Devil peeps through, and the seeming harmony is destroyed. This exaggeration is the very essence of caricature, Indeed the word itself merely means overloading. One aspect of the truth is exaggerated, and even when an artist ruthlessly points out the affinity between man and the lower animals, we know that it is unfortunately too near reality to be dismissed as untrue. Trip up the staid business man in the street, and you find his true self ; throw his features out of their accustomed balance, and you have caricature, which is not only diverting in the process, but instructional in its result.

Caricature can never flourish in an autocracy because a despot cannot brook laughter at his own expense. Basing their arguments on this hypothesis, many have maintained that caricature is truly at home in a democracy, and most of all at home in England. Unfortunately this seems to be untrue. Our best caricatures are confined to the unfrequented corners of libraries, and photography is everywhere in favour. As a nation our love 'of compromise and our respect for traditional authority seem to stifle our sense of humour. We prefer a mechanical , reproduction in art, where, if the result falls short of our expectations, the blame can be laid on faulty mechanism. But a caricaturist expresses an opinion which cannot be mistaken and we flee from such unwelcome boldness. In our democratic age we are taking ourselves still more seriously, and this is nowhere more apparent than in our politics. The old school in politics has passed away completely. We are no longer governed by cynical, careless aristocrats, but by self-made men who would lose all if they lost faith in their own opinions and ideals. Now the Muse of Caricature is a sceptical old lady, who is rather tired of seeing men play with pebbles and call them precious stones. When we take ourselves too seriously she will remind us "what shadows we are, and what shadows we pursue," and though we are sometimes a little disgusted at her lack of respect for our ideals, the laugh is on her side, and we know it.

Caricature is not the most glorious of arts, but we cannot do without it. Narcissus would not have died if the pool had known the art of caricature, and the lesson still holds good for us. Like Maggie in "What Every Woman Knows," the Muse of Caricature is essential to us, even when we know it not. She asks us to laugh at ourselves, and though we may find it a great struggle, though we may "creak" a little in the process, if the laugh rings true in the end, we are saved.

I. G. PHILIP.

The Prize Poem.

" FLIGHT."

SWIFT as an eagle on aery pinion
Soaring aloft in the sun's hot glare,
Fleetly I traverse my wide dominion,
Monarch of ocean and earth and air.
Slowly beneath me the landscape gliding
Passes, immense as a giant's chart,
Buoyantly, bravely my craft is riding ;
Steady the throb of her mighty heart.

Green-clad forest and silvery ocean,
Mountains whose summits no mortal has trod,
Proudly I spurn in my breathless motion,
Mortal no longer, sublime as a god.
So with my face to the lashing breezes,
Sunlight above me, the white clouds below,
Wheeling my course whither fancy pleases,
Mine is a joy that none other can know.

Earth lies before me, disclosing her treasure,
Secrets long hid that none other can find,
Boundless my kingdom ; I journey at pleasure
To farthest Australia or uttermost Ind.
Thus as he sunders the cloudbanks flying,
Girding the earth with a viewless span,
Hurricane tempest all dangers defying,
Who shall conceive of the wonder of man ?

E. LAUGHTON.

Why the Road was Up in Newbould Lane.

Sections of pipe along the pavement lay
Like some gigantic caterpillar. Gangs
Of navvies sprawled, passing the time o'day
And satisfying Nature's mid-day pangs
From basket, paper bag and drinking can.
Vast heaps of mud behind, a chasm before,
I stopped and asked an earthy gentleman,
"What means this cataclysm at our door ? "
"Guv'nor," he answered, "one o' your small fry
'As dropp'd a penny ; and the little tyke
Thinks it got trodden in. So Bill and I
With a few pals are just prospectin' like.
We've made a little 'ole or two, I know."
I think he spoke ironically, though.

Modern Poetry.

ADMIRERS of the newest poetry often tell us that the old material of poetry is exhausted and that the old technique is dead. This opinion is largely nonsense, for it springs from a misconception, not only of the nature of poetry, but of the essence too of technique. It would be as foolish to say that the old shape of the human face is exhausted, and that nature must invent a new one. Every original poet has made for himself a new, or partly new form of verse, but his originality has not shown itself in an utter contempt for traditional forms. Rather has he adapted those forms to the exigencies of his own genius. For genius introduces its own novelty into verse, as surely as character brings its miraculous novelty into every human face. Were another Shakespeare to be born to-morrow, he would not waste his time in turning poetry topsy-turvy, but would rather magnify and expand the tradition in which the earlier poets have written. If many of the younger poets have turned to revolutionary experiment in verse, it may well be that they have not sufficient genius to make a fresh and personal use of the traditional material and technique. In almost every aspect of their verse, they stand opposed to tradition. In their anxiety to free themselves from the shackles, partly real, partly imaginary, of exacting convention, they have swung the pendulum from the extreme of rigidity to the extreme of license.

The most striking symptom of revolt is the indiscriminate use of free-verse. Milton once said, "Rhyme is no necessary adjunct or true ornament of poem or good verse, in longer works especially, but the invention of a barbarous age, to set off wretched matter and lame metre." This opinion comes strangely from the author of "L'Allegro" and "Lycidas," who himself knew how to build the lofty rhyme ; but it is an opinion with which many of the modern poets agree. 'There is, indeed, the constant danger that rhyme will succeed in leading reason by the nose, but the fault would lie, not with rhyme but with the poet. Rhyme still has reason. The modern poet may scorn it, but he can show nothing better despite his emancipation. Obscurity does not spell originality, and a sentence disintegrated into lines of varying length does not of itself make a poem. Mr. Humbert Wolfe has championed the "modernist." "To attempt to drill words, like cowed foot-soldiers, in sonnet columns, is an internecine struggle that can only end in defeat. The words must be allowed their choice. They are not an army of slaves. They are a population of free citizens." This, presumably, explains why Mr. William Carlos Williams, President of the City Literary Institute, may write
"No that is not it,
nothing that I have done
nothing
I have done
is made up of
nothing
and the diphthong .
ae
together with
the first person
singular
indicative
of the auxiliary
verb
to have
everything."

It is, in fact, no duty of the poet to arrange the words so as to give a semblance of meaning. We must dismiss from our minds, says Mr. Wolfe, "the idea that modern art has for its motto : 'Every Picture Tells a Story.' " But the case against rhyme has not thus easily been won. Rhyme may be a bad master, but it may also, like fire, be a good servant. The great poets have pressed it into beautiful service. It is impossible to "unrhyme" a Shakespearean sonnet, or a set of heroic couplets, or an ode of Keats. Poetry is a spirit that will inspire any medium ; the conventions of verse do not at their best, stand for much. Rhyme will go some day as alliteration went; fixed metre and regular rhythm will perhaps pass into the limbo of things. But the efforts of the modern poets as a whole give no cause to fear that the time is at hand when rhyme and rhythm shall be discarded. For with rhythm no less than with rhyme have they failed, The whole skill in free-verse consists in suggesting a metre, and then, before the ear has tired of it, almost before the ear is aware of it, breaking it and substituting another. The modern poets fail in free-verse because they have scorned the traditional forms. The only superbly successful practitioner of free-verse in English is a man who had first gone through the hardest possible discipline in regular forms. The modern poets cannot emulate Milton in the choruses of "Samson Agonistes" without knowledge of his preparatory work.

The vocabulary of modern poetry is an interesting aspect of the revolt. Many of the poets at the beginning of the century were in rebellion against convention, and in vocabulary they returned to the ideas of the Elizabethans. The Elizabethans had few scruples about poetic vocabulary. They used any words, the plainest.. prose or the most purple poetry, so long as they fitted ; and they often put the two in the most violent juxtaposition. But after them, most of the poets acquired theories of diction, They were either unnaturally poetic like Pope, or they said with Wordsworth, who was fortunately too good a poet to remain fettered by his own theories, that poetry must be in the language of ordinary men. The moderns at last broke the fetters and returned to freedom. There is probably no poet between Bonne and Brooke who would have begun a love lyric with the staccato attack of Bonne's : " For God's sake hold your tongue, and let me love." Anyone of the characteristic moderns would do it instinctively. In his poem "The Old Ships," Flecker is describing Ulysses :
"That talkative bald-headed seaman came,
Twelve patient comrades sweating at the oar,
From  Troy's doom-crimson shore."

In these three lines, the prosaic "talkative," "baldheaded," and "sweating" are placed with a hyphenated epithet that Keats would not have been ashamed of.

In some writers there is observable another tendency which may be called a revolt against Romanticism, but which is perhaps no more than a natural reaction of some individual writers towards that brevity, conciseness, clarity of outline and restraint of emotion which are usually described as classic. This tendency is to be found very strongly in some of Kipling's later work, notably in the "War Epitaphs."

The modern revolt was partly against the so-called Romantics, who were felt to be too vague and mystical and who, moreover, had certain presuppositions as to the subjects suitable for poetry. Accordingly we find in the moderns' an exaggeratedly blunt directness. As they took their vocabulary indiscriminately so they took their subjects ; and we find Brooke writing none too well of a Channel crossing. But part of the revolt, the more conscious part, was against the Victorians. The fundamental difference between the moderns and the Victorians is that while the latter exalted society at the expense of the individual, the moderns tend to exalt the individual at the expense of society. The results of this reaction on much modern poetry are both interesting and unfortunate. Many of the poets have been content to develop their peculiar bent exclusively. De la Hare can write the most entrancing children's poems, and poems of a particular kind of faerie ; but he can do little else. Many modern poems too are wholly individual and in no sense universal. Brooks "Grantchester" represents exactly what he, Rupert Brooke, in a particular year of grace, felt in a particular cafe in Berlin. The reaction can be clearly realised by seeing what happens when the poet under the impact of an overwhelming event, forgets himself and writes not for the individual, but for all men. Rupert Brooke wrote this sonnet under the stimulus of a particular war, but it might have been written for any men dying for their country in any great war:

"Blow out, you bugles, over the rich dead !
There's none of these so lonely and poor of old
But, dying, has made us rarer gifts than gold.
These laid the world away ; poured out the red
Sweet wine of youth ; gave up the years to be
Of work and joy, and that unhoped serene,
That men called age ; and those who would have been,
Their sons, they gave, their immortality.

Blow, bugles, blow I They brought us, for our dearth,
Holiness, lacked so long, and Love and Pain.
Honour has come back, as a king, to earth,
And paid his subjects with a royal wage ;
And nobleness walks in our ways again ;
And we have come into our heritage."

It has been said that one of the most remarkable achievements of the English spirit today is its utterance in lyrical poetry. Not less remarkable are the long poems. Professor Lascelles Abercrombie recently disputed the persistent assumption that this is particularly the day of the shorter poem. The assertion is made by those who think that "in a long poem the true gold of poetic art is necessarily alloyed with baser metal ; only by concentrating itself into lyrical dimensions can poetry be sure of existing in the uncontaminated purity of its nature. "Professor Abercrombie indicated in refutation of the idea the late Laureate's "Testament of Beauty" : "A long poem, a philosophical poem, a poem the action of which consists entirely of argument about difficult matters—argument conducted in a strain of lofty, serene passion, illustrating itself by a bewildering wealth of substance, often not obviously poetic, though seldom resisting transmutation." This poem does not stand alone. "The Dynasts," Miss Sackville-West's "The Land" Masefield's "Reynard the Fox," combine to show that our poets are not all short-winded. Nor can it be said that the public prefers short poems. It is a remarkable fact that, in what admittedly seems at first sight the day, of the short poem, more copies of the "Testament of Beauty " have been sold since the time of its publication than any book of poetry since Byron. This success should be an encouragement to our poets, but they will always remember that mediocrity and length make a poor combination. If we are to have long poems, they must be good poems, or at least stirring poems ; it would be better to go back to "Marmion" than to provoke the songster to attempt epic grandeur.

It were hardly safe, at the moment, to predict that the more revolutionary of the poets will be affected by the work of Dr. Bridges. It is possible to assert of the "Testament of Beauty," as of "The Dynasts," that it is not quite of this generation ; that one cannot judge an age' by its survivals. The principle, indeed of the poem, the attempt to explain to men the mysteries of the Universe, to set forth in simple, beautiful language the fundamental aspects of Nature, is opposed to the spirit of all "modernist" art. The onlooker, says the modern poet, must not expect to have his verse, his pictures and his sculpture predigested for him. The object of the artist is to startle the superficial mind with reality, even though that reality be as unlike to valid as a bomb before and after bursting. "Truth is always an outrage."

If he could but lose his extremist point of view, if he could but see that virtue is not the extreme opposite of one evil, but the medium between two equally dangerous evils, he would be a poet. He was right in rebelling, in wishing to rely as little as was necessary upon tradition ; and had he tried to express himself naturally, had he not sacrificed spontaneity to deliberate opposition to accepted rules, he would not now be suffering the inner conflict of loyalty to principles and loyalty to self. For in truth "it is not metres, but a metre-making argument, that makes a poem,—a thought so passionate and alive, that, like the spirit of a plant or an animal, it has a architecture of its own, and adorns nature with a new thing. The thought and the form are equal in the order of time, but in the order of genesis the thought is prior to the form. The poet has a new thought ; he has a whole now experience to unfold ; he will tell us how it was with him, and all men will be the richer in his fortune. For the experience of each new age required a new confession, and the world seems always waiting for its poet."

E. L. MOORE.

Death and Resurrection.

I FELT the noose tighten round my neck as the brutal executioner pulled on the rope. In one more minute I should be swinging in the air—and then eternity ! At a glance my eyes took in the whole scene below : the expectant crowd, assembled here at Tyburn to see a few poor Jacobite wretches hanged ; on one side a specially erected booth filled with townsmen who had paid to obtain a superior view of the spectacle. The mob loosed howls of derision and missiles alternately. Well, I would show them how a brave man dies, and make them realise' that even a hated spy shows courage. My death I should not regret. Yet if I died I could not deliver to England's rightful king the most important message to my late master, the Earl of Derwentwater, had entrusted tome ! Still,. that was past now. With as resolute a countenance as I could muster I stepped off the platform. Thanks be to God a more merciful country no longer disembowelled and quartered its victims ! For me it would probably be the quicklime ; perhaps the. body-snatchers and a surgeon's dissecting room. . . Amid a yell of execration I dropped, the halter tightened and gripped my throat. I must have kicked out wildly. Then an unseen power appeared to clasp my windpipe, forcing me down into blackness, numbing my warm blood. In vain I struggled. In a little while I made no further efforts to resist and lay still. The little drama was over.

Then I seemed released from all pain and sorrow. My lungs breathed a balmier air, and my senses tingled with sheer delight. Joyfully I appeared to journey in the wake of many other travellers like myself. After some time two paths separated' and up one of them I was impelled to go. Gradually I came into a gentle clime in which all manner of flowers seemed to blossom, and fruit trees bear ripe harvest. Amongst these wandered many spirits radiant with celestial light. "These," said a fellow -traveller, "are the souls of those who have suffered and sacrificed their lives for others." Wondering I gazed around ; for my own person seemed suddenly to glow with just such a supernatural brightness. Then I, too, strayed amongst the blooms, and tasted of the fruits. Many of the shades came and conversed with me. Several I seemed to know : the figure of Sir Thomas Moore, or hapless King Charles, whose earthly portraits I had seen. Above all shone out one whose brow seemed crowned with thorns, and in whose side showed many wounds, the lord of the garden. By him I was drawn aside one day, soon after my arrival in private intercourse, "Thy time is not yet come," he said. "Thou hast tasted the fruits of this orchard. Now return again to earth, and bear thy message to thy earthly lord. Tell him salvation is won only by sacrifice. Thou thyself must yet endure many things for his sake, privation, exile, famine, disease and all human ills."

When I came to myself again and once more emerged into consciousness, I found myself lying prostrate in a darkened room. Through my veins a fluid that felt like fire, was coursing. After a little while my faculties returned sufficiently for me to gaze about in the gloom. I became aware of a wizened figure stooping over me where I lay on a surgeon's dissecting-table. In his hand he held a beaker containing a sparkling liquid ; while his eyes seemed fixed on mine in a transport of ecstasy. Unable yet to speak, I began to make out one by one the various appurtenances of the room. The walls were lined with shelves, filled with phials holding multi-coloured drugs. In the centre stood a small furnace, complete with bellows, alembic and still. Suddenly the coursing fire within me seemed to awake some answering chord, and all my lethargy passed off. I sat up. "Praise be to God," murmured the figure at my side, "the elixir hath been effective. Yea, since the body-snatchers brought thy corpse hither these three days ago, I have prayed for this."

Amazement possessed me at such words. A corpse ! Three clays ago ! Then curiosity surged uppermost, and the questions burst forth. "But who art thou ? How came I hither? What mean'st thou by' a corpse three days back ? ' What is this gloomy cell ? " So in my eagerness I plied him. He hesitated a short space and answered, "Swear to keep silence and I will, tell thee all." I promised. "Know then," said he, "I am an alchemist. From my youth up I have consecrated my life to a study of this art. From my books, my Hermes Trismegistus, my Albertus and my Paracelsus, I have been led away from the search for the transmuting agent to the quest of a' far greater thing, the elixir vitae. This day, heaven be praised, I have succeeded. Even as I said, three days hence thou wert hanged on Tyburn tree ; and now, by virtue of this life-giving draught, thou breathest God's air once more. For what deed thou didst suffer death I neither know nor care. Thy habit would show thee to be of gentle birth. Down then on thy knees and render thanks to Him that hath recreated thee ! Then go thy way. Remember thou hast sworn to breathe no word to any man of who I am." In awed silence I did as I was bid, and then departed. Thus it was I escaped out of the country.

"Tush," said my confessor, "it is too strange. Thou must have dreamt it, oppressed, belike, by the heat in thy poor master's cell, when he lay in the Tower. It cannot have been." He shook his head in refutation of my words.

"Even I should have been tempted to think so, father," I replied, "had it not been for these." And I showed him the marks on my neck where the rope had left its impress.

E. G. T.

The Rediscovery of Steetley.

I HAVE found a thing of rarity : a church sufficiently simple to need no history-telling, sufficiently beautiful to stand high amongst the monuments of the age that created it. Tiny it is, yet its Norman dignity and simplicity is as impressive as the powerful columns of Durham, leading as they do to Norman triforium, clerestory and stone vaulting. Here also there is continuity in the work : men have added little, but one window, besides the hew church trappings which can be forgotten.

NORMAN DOORWAY,
STEETLEY.

Let us start elsewhere since it lies in fair country with full June greenness and June warmth of scent. At Thorpe Salvin the front of the old Hall stands four-square, complete, flanked by round staircase-turrets. Only the light through the unglazed mullions of the windows reveals the fact that time has spared a facade only, a habitation for birds and a grey resting-place for the eyes of men. Before it a diminutive seventeenth-century gatehouse retains its old door with, above, a crest above a coat of arms and an obliterated motto. The little room above the gate has rows of pigeon-entrances: birds again nesting after the departure of man. Thorpe has also a preparation for Steetley in its church : behind the black beaming of the porch a Norman doorway, and, inside, Norman work turning to Early English, a pointed tower-arch with Norman zig-zag, plain Norman arches in the nave and in the sanctuary, behind the Norman chancel-arch, pointed arches give access to a North chapel, but rest themselves on plain Norman columns. Here we have two styles of architecture working in close harmony together, but with other additions we do not find any strong unity in the church. The addition of the North aisle to the original plan, the later windows—only an odd Norman window remains detract from the whole, leave us to give our admiration to individual features, the font, individual arches, the Norman doorway or the porch.

Southwards from Thorpe Salvin lies a way that few people seem to find, so still it is among the meadows. On either wayside a width of flowers and grasses together wider than the brown straight way. Here are Bird's Eye and Lady's Slipper, daisies and buttercups, field pansies, stitchwort and the new big thistles, all in "crowded holiday of scent and bloom." True, none that I have mentioned is strong in scent : yet the warm June air has tricks of drawing out of waysides and meadows little waves of warm scent as if the flowers were giving of their honey and it was sweet. Here in all this richness even the bleat of the sheep amongst tall meadows has a note of harmony : up where Hadrian's wall runs through the empty spaces below the Border the bleat of sheep sounds sharply, the very keynote of empty distances where farms are few and houses fewer and the eye travels over unbroken green into the dying distance. But here there is plenty and their bleat of satisfaction is held in by the tress and hedges instead of passing out to the moors or the sky.

Behind a little grove of trees lies Steetley Church. Out to the left, for those who wish to see it, lies Worksop, and its fringe of smoking chimneys sullies one corner of the view. But inside the grove and through the trees is visible the South Porch—the only entrance to the church. Steetley is so unspoilt that it carries one back to tiny churches seen from the train in Normandy with exquisitely rounded apses and up above in place of towers, a small and simple arch carrying a bell. Here at the base of the three apse windows, tiny in themselves but supported on the outside with plain pillars, runs a course of carved masonry, beautiful in design, adding its quota to the completed beauty of the apse. Round the roof runs the accustomed row of Norman corbels, heads fiercely grotesque and strangely pleasing to the eye.

The top part of the South Porch is criss-cross work, with, in between, circular flower-devices. Then comes a row of strange beak-heads, startling in the sharpness of their outline. And then the five orders of the doorway resting on carved capitals and carved columns. It is no longer possible to tell the subjects of the carving but perhaps that does not matter so much. We are ever inclined to seek for clear and narrow names and to be content with those rather than with informing spirit. Here we cannot but sit and wonder, for this trick Time has played us, cheating us of names we might have known, has left untouched the essential beauty of the entrance.

The door itself is modern and is to be pushed aside with a good will. Inside it is strange to read of the church's rededication in 1880 after long profanation and neglect, so little is it changed from when it left its builder's hands. The roof is modern—probably of 1880, there is a later window with decorated tracery in the chancel, but apart from this it is of pure Norman workmanship on the typically aisleless plan, with those small slit windows with broad sloping sills so characteristic of the Norman period. Two arches lead up eastwards to the apse. The first has on the North side capitals carved with scenes of knights—the only pictured ones the church contains apart from the doorway. Neither of the arches is over richly decorated, though all the capitals of the small column-clusters are rich with foliage or conventional designs. In the apse is a separate archway, down from whose centrestone lead two ribs to form the vaulting, resting on columns between the three small apse-windows. Sit where the Decorated window is not visible, look up at the stonework and not down at the pews, you are back before 1150. Outside a distant colliery may have thrust itself by woods or fields, but here in the story of man's unchanging quest for Beauty there remains the proud and quiet record of his finding it.

J.H.W.

Junior School Entertainment.

THOSE who saw "Make Believe" last year felt no doubt about the success of this year's junior School Entertainment. Their expectations have been fully justified ; the junior School has done nothing better than "The Rose and the Ring." Thackeray's "fireside pantomime," as the programme described it, was an excellent choice ; with its combination of rollicking action, humour, and a spice of subtlety, it pleased both the younger and older sections of the audience. The large cast had been selected with care and discrimination. Of the main characters, perhaps the greatest success was achieved by J. B. Ogden as Betsinda. He made a charming princess and was quite free from the awkwardness, from which boys taking feminine parts generally suffer. Not only did he act with grace ; he sang well particularly in the duet "Oh Betsinda." As the Queen, J. D. Lodge acted with confidence and spirit, and J. H. Shepherd as Princess Angelica was good, except for occasional moments of stiffness. As King Valoroso, J. B. Mathews gave us a jovial monarch whose Gilbertian antics amused the house immensely. His simple joy in eggs and "sossidges" was delightful to behold, and we felt sorry when he finally lost his crown. Of the two princes, it is difficult to decide who was the better. Both had an excellent stage-presence and both had complete self-confidence, S. Peterkin as Giglio was an ardent lover and a valiant soldier; G. Chesham as Bulbo was suitably proud and debonair.

Of the minor characters it can only be said that they supported the principals extraordinarily well. A. J. Spedding was good as the arch Countess Gruffanuff, and her amiable husband Jenkins Gruffanuff was convincingly portrayed by A. G. Blake. A. H. Nicholls, as Hedzoff, seemed to be happy in the part of the brave if somewhat unintelligent warrior, and rapped out soldierly oaths with perfect sangfroid. In a cast of nearly fifty, however, it is impossible to mention every individual. We cannot stay to describe at length those valiant generals Smith and Jones, the wicked king Padella, Count Hogginarmo, the Woodcutter (with his delightfully natural family), or the bewildering pageant of clowns, bridesmaids, monks, soldiers, heralds, and pages, all of whom were, by some mysterious means, crowded on the stage in the final curtain. Nor must we forget the savage Lion, whose terrifying roars were, fittingly enough, rendered by a member of the School Orchestra.

The costumes, most of which had been made by parents, were delightful : and the scenery was very effective. The singing, though patchy, was considerably better than last year, and Mr. Bayliss is to be congratulated on having extracted so much from such youthful performers. The whole show went with a swing which revealed the hard work and skilful management of the anonymous Producers.

E.L.

Cricket 1930.

A BARE statement of the 1st Elevens' record—four defeats, five matches drawn, and only one victory—might well give the impression of a most unsatisfactory season. On the contrary, the team may congratulate itself on having played attractive and clever cricket which has always pleased the spectator and has never degenerated into mere stodgy utility. In only two instances have we cause for self-reproach,—the inexplicable lapses against the Central Secondary School and Derby School, which may perhaps have had their foundation in over-confidence. In four of the five drawn games we might reasonably have looked for victory : that, however, is mere matter for speculation, but what is certain is that we need accept no blame for the failure to bring the matches to a decision. On three occasions the late arrival of our visitors made a definite result almost impossible from the first.

As was hinted in the previous issue of the Magazine, the batting has been our strength. We have had authentic batsmen down to number nine. Honours have been distributed fairly evenly ; we have not had to depend on one star whose early eclipse has been the forerunner of disaster. For our bowling we have been too dependent on Tufft and Williams, both of whom have responded gallantly but often in vain. The fielding has been good, as indeed it should be with so brilliant a fieldsman as the captain to inspire the team.

The Second Eleven has acquitted itself quite creditably with three victories, one defeat, and one drawn game. That solitary defeat might have been reversed if the opportunity had been seized. It is to be hoped that we shall not suffer too many losses from this team, as here we seem to have good material for next year's First Eleven.

The Under 14 Eleven has done splendidly, winning four matches out of five. Wray has been a most able captain, and shares the bowling honours with Hanson. There has been a most refreshing air of keenness about this side which augurs well for future School teams.

The revised House Championship Competition has been a great success. It has undoubtedly improved the School cricket as a whole and has aroused that interest which produces keen and wholehearted effort. Clumber are Champions after a stern struggle with Wentworth who only failed at the last fence.

Cricket.

CHARACTERS OF THE FIRST XI.

ANDERSON, G. A.—A useful bat with a good cover drive. Should keep awake in the field.

BATEMAN, A. W.—A good bat though rather slow.. His fielding has improved recently.

BATEMAN, H. T.—A useful left-hander but has not fulfilled last year's promise. His fielding is very weak.

CREDLAND, J.—A forcing bat with a good leg stroke. A useful slow bowler and good in the field.

CUMMING, C. J.—A fair wicket-keeper though at times very slow. His batting lacks enterprise.

PEAT, F. A.—His bowling has been disappointing ; he should learn to keep a better length. His batting is useful when runs are required quickly.

TAYLOR, T. A.—Has the making of a good bowler. His batting is weak and his fielding could be improved.

TORY, G. W.—A moderate bat and a useful bowler ; fields well at point.

WILLIAMS, E. T.—A useful opening batsman but must learn to hit straight ; good in the outfield.

WILLIAMS, J.—Has been a very useful man to the side. A good bat and a useful bowler who breaks the ball both ways. His fielding is good. G.T.

TUFFT, G.—A pretty bat and a magnificent field. Has also borne the brunt of the bowling. An excellent captain.

K.E.S. 1st XI, v. NOTTINGHAM HIGH SCHOOL 1ST XI.

Played at Whiteley Woods, Saturday May 24th. Owing to a late start and much unenterprising batting there was little likelihood of this game being finished. The School batted first and Anderson and Williams put on a useful 24 for the first wicket. A collapse followed and half the side were out for 54. Then Credland and Williams took the score to 103 before Tufft declared. Notts. also scored slowly and at the close had only got 66 runs for the loss of four wickets. T. Williams got 3 wickets for 22 runs. Details:

K.E.S.

 

NOTTINGHAM

 

E, T. Williams, c, Payne

13

.W. E. G. Payton' not out

25

G, A. Anderson run out

19

C. F. Carr, b. Credland

4

A. W. Bateman c. Sutton b, Carr

7

A. H. Bowman b, Williams

19

G. Tufft c, Payne, b, Carr

0

A. G. Payne, b, Williams

3

H. T. Bateman, b, Payne

4

J, Kennedy, l.b.w,, b. Williams

1

J Credland not out

21

F. W. Sharman not out

10

J Williams not out

26

   

Tory, Peat, Cumming and Taylor did not bat.

 

Sutton, Richardson, Collins, Taylor and Sampson did not bat,

 

Extras

13

Extras

4

Total (for 5 wickets declared)

103

Total (for 4 wickets)

66

Match drawn.

K.E.S. 1ST XI. v. CENTRAL SECONDARY SCHOOL 1ST XI.

Played at Whiteley Woods, Wednesday May Y 28th. A most interesting match ended in a victory for the Central by 4 runs. The visitors, batting first were dismissed cheaply for 69, Williams taking 4 for 15 and Credland 3 for 5. After tea the School shaped deplorably against Frost and Lister and made only 65. H. T. Bateman played a good defensive innings of 18 not out. Details :—

CENTRAL.

 

KES

 

Gott l.b.w, b. Tufft 

0

E. T. Williams, c. Collins, b. Frost ....

16

Turner, c, and b. Williams

19

G. A. Anderson, c. Collins, b. Lister ..

6

Hutt l.b.w., b. Williams ...

7

G. Tufft, b. Frost 

0

Burley, b. Williams.. .....

0

A. W. Bateman, b. Frost 

4

Crehan' c, Cumming' b. Credland 

10

H, T. Bateman, not out 

18

Frost, c. Anderson, b. Williams 

1

J. Credland, b, Lister 

0

Beal c. Cumming, b. Credland 

13

J. Williams, c, Burley, b. Lister 

12

Collins, l.b.w., b, Credland 

2

G. W. Tory, b. Lister 

0

Booker c. . Williams, b. Taylor J

2

F. A. Peat, st. Gott, b. Lister 

2

Mulbrenan not out.. .

6

G. J. Cumming, l.b.w., b. Frost 

1

Lister, b. Taylor 

2

T, A. Taylor, b, Frost

1

Extras 

7

Extras 

 

Total

69.

Total

65

K.E.S. 1ST XI v. BRADFORD GRAMMAR SCHOOL.

Played at Whiteley Woods Saturday May 31st. The School batted first, and good scores by Anderson, Credland and Williams enabled Tufft to declare at 120 for 7. There was little time in which to get Bradford out, but they lost 7 wickets in compiling 38 runs. Tufft and Taylor were unplayable each taking 3 for 11. Details :—

K.E.S.

 

BRADFORD.

 

E. T, Williams b. East 

8

V. Ormondroyd, b. Taylor

3

G. A. Anderson, b Ormondroyd 

28

J. B. Hanson, b. Taylor

10

A. W. Bateman b. Driver

0

F, Taylor, b, Tufft 

1

G, Tufft l.b.w., b. Driver 

7

A. A, Driver, c, Tory, b. Tufft 

0

H. T. Bateman, b. Driver 

0

H. A. East, b. Taylor

1

J. Credland b. Brunt

22

J. Barraclough, c. Taylor, b, Tufft ....

3

. Williams not out 

20

J, B. Rowe, not out

16

G. W. Tory b, Brunt 

7

J. W. Ackroyd, run out 

0

F, A. Peat, not out 

16

G, W. Moore, not out

0

Extras 

12

Extras 

4

Total (for 7 wickets declared)

120

Total (for 7 wickets)

38

K.E.S. 1ST XI. v. MOUNT ST. MARY'S CHESTERFIELD 1ST XI,

Played at Whiteley Woods Saturday June 7th. The School batted first, and after losing 3 wickets for 31, a good partnership between the Batemans took the score to 98.' At 133 for 6 Tuft declared, and a draw seemed certain. Mount St. Mary's began slowly, but when Filby was out at 35 an effort was made to quicken the pace. The rest of the runs were made in a little over an hour, the score at the close being 128 for 9. It was a pity there was not time to finish the game. One over would probably have sufficed one way or the other. Details :—

K.E.S.

 

MOUNT ST. MARY'S

 

C, T. Williams c, Sharp, b. Parsons

14

Waddington, st. Cumming, b. Williams

29

G. A. Anderson, c. Lanceley, b. Smith

7

Filby, b. Peat 

15

A. W. Bateman, c. Filby, b. McCreton

19

W. Smith, b. Tufft ... .

35

G, Tufft, c. Browne, b. Mole 

2

McCreton, C. Anderson, b. Peat 

11

H. T. Bateman, c, Mole, b. Nolan

46

Sharp, not out 

8

D. W. Burley, not out 

5

McKnight, b. Tufft 

4

J. Credland, c. Lanceley, b McCreton ..

15

Browne, b. Peat

6

Williams, Peat, Cumming and

 

Parsons, l.b.w., b. Peat 

0

Taylor did not bat

 

Nolan, c. Anderson, b. Tufft 

3

Extras 

25

Mole, run out 

14

   

Lanceley did not bat

 

Total for 6 wickets declared) ....

133

Extras 

3

   

Total (for 9 wickets) 

128

K.E.S. 1ST XI, V. DERBY SCHOOL 1ST XI

Played at Derby, Saturday June 14th. Derby seems to be the School's Waterloo. As last year the School made a wretched show against a team which certainly was not stronger than others they had met. Derby batted first and at tea had made 105 for 6. A collapse followed, the whole side being out for the addition of 8 runs. The School began disastrously, losing the first two wickets without a run on the board.

Half the side was out for 17, but Tory and Williams then offered some resistance. However, this was not for long and the whole side was soon out for a meagre 48. This was the lowest score of the season against a school side. Details :—

DERBY,

 

K.E.S.

 

D. G, Young, c. Tory, b, Credland

1

G. Tufft, b, Yeomans 

0

I. Yorke, b, Williams 

2

G. A. Anderson st, Whitaker, b, Yorke

0

R, E. Eastwood, run out 

25

H, T. Bateman, c. Yorke b, Yeomans

8

W, H. Hooper, b, Peat 

15

A, W, Bateman, c, and b. Yeomans

0

M. Whitaker, c. Cumming, b. Williams

49

E, T. Williams, run out

2

A. J, Bussell, run out.... .

4

J. Williams, b, Yorke 

17

H. F. Calvert b. Credland

8

J, Credland, st. Whitaker, b Yeomans

0

K. E, Fielding, c. Tory, b, Peat

0

G, W, Tory, not out

15

A. J. Morley, st. Cumming, b. Williams

0

F . A. Peat, st, Whitaker, b, Yorke

4

A. S. Yeomans, c, H. T. Bateman, b, Williams

0

T. A, Taylor, b, Yorke

0

 

 

G, J. Cumming, c. Yorke b, Yeomans

0

B, G, Butler, not out 

1

Extras 

2

Extras

8

   

Total

113

Total

48

.....

K.E.S. 1ST XI v. OLD BOYS,

Played at Whiteley Woods on Saturday June 21st. Opening on a splendid wicket, the Old Boys gave an excellent display of batting, mainly due to a fine innings by . T. Burdekin and good scores by Smith Wall and Reyner.

For the School, Credland took 3 for 27 and . Williams 3 for 49. Replying to such a total, the School by no means disgraced themselves with 171. Tufft scored a hurricane 38, and the Batemans and Peat all made useful totals.

O.E's

 

K.E.S.

 

G, E. Vernon, l.b.w. C. Taylor 

5

Williams, E. T,, b, Revill

9

Smith, c, Bateman, A. W., b, Tufft

35

Anderson G. A, st. Merchant b, Reyner

11

J, T, Burdekin, b. Taylor 

73

Bateman, A. W,, b. Revill

29

Wall, c. Tufft, b, Williams, J

39

Bateman H, T, c. Browhill c. Reyner

27

Reyner, c, and b. Credland 

44

Tufft, G.,. b. Reyner

38

L. Burdekin, b. Tufft ,

9

Williams, J., c, and b, Wall ....

8

Revill, c. Bateman A, W, b. Credland

7

Credland , J,, c, T. H. Vernon, b, L. Burdekin 

8

Merchant, b, Credland 

6

Peat, F. A., b. Revill

26

Brownhill c, Peat b. Williams J

5

Tory, G. W,, c, Merchant b, Revill.

11

T. H. Vernon, c, Williams, E, T,, b, Credland 

1

Taylor, T, A., l.b.w. C, J, T. Burdekin

0

Willis not out

0

Cumming, G. J, not out ,

0

Extras 

9

Extras

4

Total

233

Total,

171

K.E.S. 2ND XI V. MOUNT ST. MARY'S 2ND XI.

The match was played at Mount St. Mary's on Saturday June 7th. The home team selected to have first use of an ideal wicket but fared badly to the good bowling of Whitman and Nornable, losing 9 wickets with only 57 on the board. The last pair, however, carried the total to 117 in splendid fashion, before Nornable, in his second spell of bowling, broke the partnership. Against only moderate bowling, the School collapsed, Braithwaite who hit five boundaries, being the only batsman to show opposition. The visitors' fielding never reached the high standard of their opponents.

MOUNT ST. MARY'S II.

 

K.E.S. II,

 

F, Gilbert, c. Hubbard, c, Nornable

0

Burton, b. Monteith 

1

L, Price l.b.w. B, Nornable 

1

Mason l.b.w., b. Payne 

2

F. Vasquez, b. Whitman

21

Whitman, l.b.w,,, b. Monteith

0

D. Bailey, c. Nornable, b, Whitman . ,

12

Nornable, st. Gilbert, b. Payne

0

R. Bacon, b; Nornable . , .

7

Brawn, l.b.w,, b, Lees

4

W. Bennett, c. Marsden, b. Nornable ..

3

Buckley, c. Payne, b, Lees

6

A. Lynch, b. Whitman ...

0

Cook, b, Kemp

9

S. Payne, c. Braithwaite, b. Whitman..

4

Braithwaite c, Monteith, b. Payne ....

20

M. Monteith, b. Whitman 

1

Marsden, b. Kemp 

0

M. Lees, not out 

21

Paddon not out 

4

G, Kemp, b. Nornable 

37

Hubbard, b, Payne

0

Extras 

10

Extra :

4

Total,.

117

Total,,

47

Whitman 5 for 25 : Nornable 5 for 28.

   

 

MR. A. J. BATEMAN'S XII. v. A K.E.S. XII.

Played at Whiteley Woods on Monday June 9th. This Match was one of twelve-a-side. The veterans batted first; and Mr. Nornable was complete master of the School bowling weakened as it was by the absence of Peat, Tory and Williams. Mr. Tufft was a great support to him. When these two valuable wickets had fallen to Cook, Mr, Bateman and Mr. Rippon made an unexpected last wicket stand of thirty-one. It is surprising that most of the visitors' score was made by the three parents of the School XII, who were

playing. The School fielding was a "thing of shreds and patches." But for Anderson and H. T. Bateman the School batsman never really settled down until Cumming and Taylor became associated. Again the total for the last wicket was thirty-one but this time by shots "that never were on sea or land" seen previous to this. Nevertheless a fighting finish was thus provided to what it is hoped to make an annual fixture.

A. J. BATEMAN ESQ'S. X11,

 

A K.E.S. XII.

 

H. Darley run out 

11

E, T. Williams, c. Bradshaw, b, Young

6

H, Wales, b. Tufft 

0

G, A, Anderson, b. Rippon 

25

E. Nornable, b, Cook 

74

A. W, Bateman, b. Rippon 

6

Wales c Anderson b. Credland .

2

H. T. Bateman, b. Bradshaw 

21

0. Wales, b. Credland

3

G. T, Tufft, b. Nornable

13

N. Bradshaw, b Braithwaite 

5

G. W. Burley, c. Tufft b. Saville 

1

B. H. Tuft, st. Cumming, b, Cook . , . ,

20

J. Credland, b, Young

8

S. Rippon, not out 

6

H. F. Cook, b. Young

0

H. Vernon, b Cook

0

Braithwaite, b. Nornable ,,,,

2

F. T. Saville, l.b.w., b. Cook 

2

G. Nornable ,b. Nornable 

7

A. Young, c. Credland b, Tufft 

1

G. T Cumming, c. Nornable

10

A. J. Bateman, b. Taylor 

26

J. A. Taylor, not out 

22

Extras 

10

Extras 

10

Total

160

Total

131

Bowling :—for the School, H. F. Cook, 4 for 19; . Credland 2 for 27
for Mr. Bateman's XII, E. Nornable 4 for 25; A. Young 3 for 20.

K.E.S. 2ND XI, v. PUPIL TEACHER CENTRE 1ST XI,      

K.E.S. 2ND XI.

 

PUPIL TEACHER CENTRE.

 

D. W. Burley, l.b.w., b. Heatherington

3

R, Flint, l.b.w. Whitman 

13

G. K. Burton, b, Mead 

2

G. Heatherington, b. Nornable

1

Mason, b. Mead

1

J. Mead, b. Whitman 

g

J. Whitman b. Heatherington 

12

P. Hewis l.b.w., Whitman 

26

G. Nornable, b. Heatherington 

0

J. Thomson, b. Whitman 

4

R P. Brown c. Heatherington b, Pearson 

17

H. Cowlishaw, b. Whitman

3

R. Buckley, l.b.w. Mead

1

A. Danks, c. Mason, b, Whitman ....

0

S. T. Paddon run out 

1

A. Smedley, b, Braithwaite 

15

H. F. Cook, b. Flint 

1

S. Pearson, b. Paddon

3

R. Braithwaite, not out 

39

E. Burrel, c. Buckleigh, b, Braithwaite

9

H. T. Hubbard, c. and b, Pearson ....

6

H. Wragg not out 

1

Extras 

5

Extras 

5

Total

88

Total ,,

86

School won by 2 runs.

     

CRICKET.

HOUSE CHAMPIONSHIP

   

W.

L.

D.

Points

1.

Clumber

4

0

3

11

2.

Wentworth

4

1

2

10

3.

Welbeck

4

2

1

9

4.

Arundel

4

3

0

8

5.

Sherwood

3

3

1

7

6.

Chatsworth ..

2

4

1

5

7.

Lynwood

2

5

0

4

8.

Haddon

1

6

0

2

The Swimming Sports.

LAST November, when we shared our Swimming Sports with the Y.M.C.A., we were given some signs of good quality. On Tuesday, June 24th, this impression was considerably strengthened. On the following Monday we found definitely that the School can swim.

The Heats showed some excellent races, and it was obvious that nobody could afford to take it easy. In many cases the race was not decided until the last stroke. We may instance the tussle between Tyas and Tillbrook for the Breast Stroke (over sixteen), and a number of fights in the 14-16 division between Blatherwick and Foggitt. The Long Plunge provided some good distances, and it was unfortunate that more could not be allowed in the Finals.

A large crowd appeared on Monday, June 30th, to see the Final events. In the Free Style Open event, the race was open until the last lap, when Marsden drew ahead to win an excellent race, Tilbrook and Peat being close behind. The Free Style (14-16) produced a remarkably good race between Blatherwick and Foggitt. The two Breast Stroke races (over 16 and 14-16) were possibly the best events of the evening, the first three in each case being so close that the order was not decided until the very end.

Excellent style was shown in the Neat Dive and the Style Swimming. Tilbrook ran Blatherwick very close in both, being so near in the second that they had to swim the Back Stroke again before a decision could be made.

The Relay Race against the Old Boys was in doubt to the very moment when Wall touched to beat Marsden by inches. The other Relay Race against the Staff added an original note to the proceedings, and well deserved the name of a "Surprise Item," bestowed on it by Mr. Magrath. (We must not forget the other Surprise Item, by the way—a certain "Joseph's coat" costume which added distinction to the proceedings).

As a result of good swimming, Welbeck well deserved the Melling Cup and the honour of winning the House swimming championship. May we have an even better show next year.

RESULTS.

FREE STYLE (over 16), 3 lengths.—I, Marsden, F. ; 2. Tilbrook, W. A. ; 3, Peat, F. A. Time : 72 sees.

FREE STYLE (14-16), 2 lengths.—I, Blatherwick, S. ; 2, Foggitt, K. D. ; 3, Slack, D. A. Time : 47 2/5 secs.

FREE STYLE (under 14), 1 length.—1, Holden, H. A. ; 2, Green, A. J. ; 3, Foggitt, C. H. Time : 25 4/5 secs.

BREAST STROKE (over 16), 2 lengths.—1, Tyas, R. F. ; 2, Paddon, S. T. ; 3, Tilbrook, W. A. Time : 57 3/5 secs.

BREAST STROKE (14-16), 1 length,—Foggitt, K. D. ; 2, Hawkeswell, R. I. ; 3, Blatherwick, S. Time : 23 4/5 secs.

BREAST STROKE (under 14), 1 length.—1, Green, A. J. ; 2, Foggitt, C. H. ; 3, Larder, H. Y. Time : 29 secs.

BACK STROKE (over 18), 2 lengths.—1, Tilbrook, W. A. ; 2, Paddon, S. T. ; 3, Marsden, F. Time : 54 3/5 secs.

BACK STROKE (14-16), 1 length.—1, Blatherwick, S. ; 2, Foggitt, K. D. ' 3, Wragg, L. Time : 26 secs.

BACK STROKE (under 14.) 1, Foggitt, C. H. ; 2, Walton, S. K.

NEAT DIVE.—I, Blatherwick, S.; 2, Tilbrook, W. A.; 3, Paddon, S. T.

LONG PLUNGE—1, Wragg, L. ; 2, Blatherwick, S. ; 3, Moore, E. Distance: 43ft, 8.5ins.

SENIOR RELAY RACE—1, Welbeck ; 2, Chatsworth.

JUNIOR RELAY RACE—I, Chatsworth ; 2, Lynwood.

STYLE SWIMMING—1, Blatherwick, S.; 2, Tilbrook, W. A.; 3, Paddon, S. T.

School (Blatherwick, Tilbrook, Peat, Marsden) versus Old Edwardians O.E's won by a touch.

HOUSE COMPETITION.

1.

Welbeck ..

.. 214

5.

Sherwood

.. 80

2.

Chatsworth

134

6.

Clumber

.. 69

3.

Wentworth

97

7.

Haddon

.. 37

4.

Lynwood..

84

8.

Arundel

.. 22

        MELLING CUP.—Welbeck (Tilbrook, W. A.; Blatherwick, S.; Peat, F. A. Wigfull, C.).

Fives.

FOR many years it has been one of the duties of the prefects to, take care of the School fives gloves. Last term, the gloves were in such demand that it was found necessary to impose a fine on all who kept a pair of School gloves for more than one day. The scheme has worked excellently, and will probably be continued next term.

The interest of all members of the fives club has been focussed on the two competitions, details of which will be found below. In the open competition the finalists were again Tilbrook and Cumming, the former, being the winner. The house competition provided several exciting matches, but the one which will live the longest in the memories of those concerned was that between Welbeck and ;Chatsworth in the semi-final. Welbeck lost the first game, and only after a tremendous struggle was it able to win the next two games. In the final Haddon was decisively beaten, Welbeck. thus winning the house fives cup for the third year in succession.

W.A.T.

HOUSE COMPETITION.

1st ROUND

SEMI-FINAL

FINAL

WINNER

Clumber

     

(Turner and Tyas)

     
 

Arundel

   

Arundel

15-13, 13-15

   

(Appleby and Memmott)

15-11

   
   

Haddon

 

Lynwood

 

15-7, 15-4

 

(Bendle and Shortland)

     
 

Haddon

   

Haddon

15-0, 13-15

   

(Parker and Hopkinson)

16-14

   
     

Welbeck

Sherwood

   

15-4 15-2

(Cook and Evans)

     
 

Welbeck

   

Welbeck

15-3, 15-7

   

(Tilbrook and Williams)

     
   

Welbeck

 

Chatsworth

 

13-15, 15-9

 

(Credland and Cumming)

 

15-12

 
 

Chatsworth

   

Wentworth

15-0, 15-6

   

(Vallans and Buckley)

J

   

OPEN COMPETITION.

1st ROUND

2ND ROUND

3RD ROUND

SEMI-FINAL

FINAL

WINNER

Williams, E. T.

Williams

       

Philip, I. G.

         
   

Williams

     

Shortland, B. T.

Credland

       

Credland, J.

         
     

Tilbrook

   

Hopkinson . H.

Hopkinson

       

Laughton E

         
   

Tilbrook

     

Cook, H. F.

Tilbrook

       

Tilbrook, W. A.

     

Tilbrook

 
 

Wigfull

       

Wigfull, C.

         
   

Parker

     

Parker, D.

Parker

       

Appleby, F. R

         
     

Parker

   
 

Tyas

       

Tyas, R. F.

 

Bendle

     
 

Bendle

       

Bendle, G. W.

       

Tilbrook

           

Evans, N. L.

Evans

'

'

   

Jones, D. B.

         
   

Evans

     

Buckley, R. H.

Buckley

       

Booth, J. N.

         
     

Cumming

   

Millar, E. L. M.

Millar

       

slack, D. A.

         
   

Cumming

     

Linacre, J.

Cumming

       

Cumming, G. J.

 

-

 

Cumming

 
           

Blake

Blake

       
   

Blake

     

Doyle, A.

Doyle

       
     

Turner

   
 

Burley

       

Burley, D. W.

 

Turner

     
           

Turner, E. G.

Turner

 

-

   

Oxford Letter.

The Queen's College,
Oxford,
June 30th, 1930.

Dear Mr. Editor,

The delay, since that nascent lawyer and—to give an opinion—successful Freshman„ Mr. H. C. Howson, asked me to write a letter to you, is due to Eights Week being just begun when he asked, me, and Eights -Week has meant for me rowing as well as the invasion by visitors which is the common lot. Please forgive me and send me a copy of the magazine.

Oxford is just reaching its true Spring Term state now after half a term of bad weather. I had three years, before this, when Trinity Term in Oxford was the best time in life, even though Schools were twice at the end of it. I envy Hale at Wadham, Stradling here, and Hopkinson at Jesus for doing their Schools this term, however, it's too wretched to do anything else in.

The chief things to avoid in Oxford are any firm of credence in the "Isis," undesirable acquaintances (e.g., with the 9.45 a.m. denizens of the Clarendon Buildings), excessive morning coffee, except in Stewarts or the Super, which are virtually, from their atmosphere, ante-rooms to the next lecture, and the Gilbert and Sullivan fortnight. Booking for this fortnight begins at 10 a.m. a month or so previously, and ends about 10.45 a.m. the same day because of a queue which stands from about 6.45 a.m. with an average order of 50 or 60 seats per man. The last performance was on Saturday night. Although I was never at a performance this year, I am compelled to listen, in my bath, whenever in the rest of the term two or three are bathing together who were, to anything from the "Lord High Executioner" to "Brightly dawns our Wedding day," with the Leo Sheffield variations and the obligingly automatic double encore so familiar to the enthusiasts. Perhaps I am a hide-bound highbrow, but I am spending as many hours if this week as I can at the Stratford-on-Avon Players (who really are the only Shakespearean Company I like), and am contemplating with some glee the prospect of countering "That very knowing, easy going, overflowing Paladin" with "There dwelt a man in Babylon, lady, lady, etc."

Potter agrees with me, but I wish I had his circle of Indian Princes, American ex-journalists and Jude-the-Obscure's for acquaintances. I have seen Graves punting a canoe (may he fall in ; I can't do it), Shaw rowing with a straight back at 7, Gilmore and Connel only behind smiles of greeting and Revill playing cricket again. Meetham, when not listening to someone's gramophone, also plays cricket. Todd plays squash and bridge, and Stradling either plays squash or goes walks (as we all do). Hall and Hopkinson both play tennis violently.

The distribution of schools favours history in the following way. Classical Greats Todd and Stradling, Modern Greats Gilmore, Physics Meetham, Law Howson, Forestry Connel, Myself Burmese and Indian Law, Language, and History, and the rest, I believe, Modern History.

—That is all my tale Sirs, I hope 'tis new t'yer. Wishing you a good term and season.

I am, Dear Mr. Editor, Yours sincerely,
C. F. Gracie.

Cambridge Letter.

Trinity College, Cambridge.

Dear Mr. Editor,

Now it is my turn to write the Cambridge letter ! Now I can libel Messrs. Baldwin and Lupton in the way they have always libelled me.'

Little do they think that I have' waited and watched (and worked) for this one supreme moment of my life—the moment in which I can put into print the many scandals I hear daily of those two hitherto undetected miscreants !

But what is this they tell me ? Baldwin has worked hard. Lupton has worked hard. Pcha ! I do not believe them 1

I have seen two other O.E's here this term, namely, Swallow and Tommy Leigh, and it is consoling to feel that some, at any rate, of one's past friends at School realise that everyone cannot go to Oxford and become degenerate, if nothing worse !

Swallow came up to take his M.A. and Tommy Leigh to try and do "big business" with the Cambridge magnates, as though he didn't realise, poor fellow, that the only "big business" here is (lone between "Prigs" and undergraduates ! Moreover, I soon cured him, and neither of us worked (much) on at least one evening ! Concerning the "local colour," I will now admit that John Baldwin has worked hard, and Lupton, I know, always works hard.

I haven't been exactly idle (mainly because medicine demands a fair share of anyone's time) but I have occasionally found time to play Rugger for that exclusive (and apparently so much envied 1) club—The Crown and Anchor, Soccer for the C.U. Medical Society and Golf for my College, all equally badly ! With our best wishes to the School in every sphere of its activities.

I am, Mr. Editor,
Yours sincerely,
C. Lindsley Blacklock.

Old Edwardians C. C.

OLD EDWARDIANS CRICKET CLUB.

Dear Sir,

Owing to a most welcome influx of new members both teams have had quite an excellent season so far, the respective records being

1st XI

Played 11,

Won 6,

Lost 3,

Drawn

2

A. XI

11 10,

„ 6,

„ 2,

11

2.

The outstanding performance this season has been the record first wicket stand for the A. team of 137 runs by Coulson and Barlow, who scored 80 not out and 41 not out respectively against Darwins Sports. Barlow also took part in another opening stand of over a century against Buxton with G. E. Vernon, who scored 78.

Old Boys' Day was a complete success, partly due to the fact that Mr. Graham was amongst us from start to finish and also that Lunch was again served in the Pavilion by Mrs. Smith. It is a strange thing to say but should ever the old Pavilion get burned down or our old friend Smith retire, cricket, at Whiteley Wood, will surely seem quite different. We congratulate the School on the excellent fight they made and hope that some of them will join us when they leave.

Except for the fact that certain members are rather inclined to "jib" at matches played at any distance from the city I have had no cause for complaint. Indeed, I am so satisfied with a secretary's job at the present moment that the sight of O.E's playing for opposing clubs only fills me with a great pity instead of a fierce anger.

Yours truly

DARELL H. FOXON, Hon. Sec.

Personal.

DEATH.

PEARSON.—On June 13th, Rev. VALENTINE WARD PEARSON, aged 73 years, late Headmaster of Wesley College and Principal of Sheffield Training College.

MARRIAGE.

RAYNER-MACLAURIN.—On May 29th, at Sharrow Lane United Methodist Church, George H. Rayner (K.E.S. 1915-1921), to Muriel E. Maclaurin, of Strathearn, Canterbury Avenue, Sheffield.

BIRTH.

BESWICK.—On July 9th, at Sefton Lodge, Clarendon Road, to Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Beswick, a daughter.

APPOINTMENTS.

R. B. FISHER (1918-1926), Demonstrator in the Department of Biochemistry in the University of Oxford.

A. LYTTON SELLS (1906-1914), Professor of French Language and Literature in the University of Durham.

UNIVERSITY EXAMINATIONS, ETC.

OXFORD.

LITERAE HUMANIORES : CLASS I.—H. E. W. Turner.

FINAL HONOUR SCHOOL OF NATURAL SCIENCE : CLASS II.—H. Eagers.

CAMBRIDGE.

HISTORY TRIPOS PART I.: CLASS I.——D. E. Lupton.

MEDIAEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES TRIPOS, B.A.—J. H. Baldwin.

SHEFFIELD.

B.ENG., HONOURS : CLASS I.—J. J. Cumming, H. S. Whitaker. DIVISION II.—R. Neill.

B.Sc., HONOURS IN PHYSIOLOGY, CLASS I.—A. H. Briggs. CLASS II.—J. M. Ridyard.

HONOURS IN CHEMISTRY, CLASS If.—A. Bradley.

B.Sc. TECH. CLASS I.—J. L. Robinson. CLASS II.—G. W. M. Rees.

B.MET. FIRST DIVISION.—D. W. Crossley.

LL.B.—L. J. M. Smith. (HONOURS); R. A. Slessor.

M.B., CH.B.—K. G. A. Barlow.

B.A., HONOURS IN HISTORY, CLASS II.—W. F. Cryer.

HONOURS IN ENGLISH, CLASS II.—E. M. Turner.

DIPLOMA IN EDUCATION.—C. B. J. Hart, M.A.; J. B. Newton, M.A.

FIRST EXAM. FOR M.B., CH.B.—G. F. E. Ramsden.

FIRST AND SECOND do. H. R. Vickers.

INTERMEDIATE B.A.—J. F. Bendle (Honours in Classics), M. L. Walker (Honours in French and Spanish).

INTERMEDIATE B.Sc.—C. A. Murray (Honours in Chemistry), D. A. Derry, R. D. Y. Perrett.

INTERMEDIATE LL.B.—S. E. Furey, R. H. Graveson, C. J. Morton, B. Sharp, D. O. Swift.

INTERMEDIATE B.ENG.—J. L. Mease.

PRE-REGISTRATION EXAM. FOR MEDICAL AND DENTAL STUDENTS.—P. M. Inman, F. C. Jackson.

DURHAM.

FINAL HONOUR SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY, CLASS I.—A. King.

PRELIM. EXAM. OF THE PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY OF GREAT BRITAIN.—H. G. Lawton.

BRADFORD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE TRAVELLING SCHOLARSHIP FOR MODERN LANGUAGES.—-K. S. Ramage.

INTERMEDIATE EXAM. OF CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS : J. R. Crookes.

Transitus Social.

AS the Transitus Social was in the Summer term this year, it was thought more suitable to spend the evening after tea outside, instead of holding the usual entertainment in the dining hall. The suggestion was made that a cricket match be played on the juniors' pitch in front of. the School, and although the Transitus does not figure very prominently in the School Elevens, a game was arranged between the present and last year's form. The idea was very popular and the match proved so enjoyable that it is hoped that it will become an annual event.

The Sixth took first knock and a fine stand of 61 runs for the 1st wicket by Credland and Williams seemed to emphasise the doubts as to whether the Transitus bowlers could dismiss their opponents for a reasonable total. The second wicket fell at 80, and then the bowlers took command, so that wickets fell regularly, the final score being 152. The only batsmen to reach double figures were the three opening players—Credland 30, Williams 84, and Burley 12—and the tail was so long that the other eight only scored 15 runs altogether. Williams played a really fine innings, his hits including 14 four's, and he only lost his wicket by hitting out wildly at a straight ball from Tingle. Although he was a little slow in settling clown, after Credland left him, he opened out and saved his side from what might have been a disastrous collapse. He only gave one chance, a difficult catch at the wicket off Whitman before the first wicket partnership had been broken. Buckley had the best bowling analysis taking 3 wickets for 32 runs, while Whitman had 3 for 67, Tingle 2 for 20 and Hawkes 1 for 22.

The Transitus began their innings badly, losing their first three wickets for 19 runs, of which Tingle had made 13, Vardy, Coates and Buckley all failing to score. Mason, with an excellent 20, Whitman 16, Fletcher 14 and Hawkes 12 not out all made valiant but unsuccessful attempts to save the game, but the last Transitus wicket fell at 94, leaving the old Transitusians easy victors by 58 runs. Credland 3 for 27, Taylor 3 for 39, Burley 2 for 11 and Cook 1 for 5, all bowled well for the winners.

The bowling oil both sides was generally good, though Whitman was rather erratic during his first spell, and although some of the Sixth Formers were at times careless in the field, Burley being the chief offender, the general standard of the fielding was good. The batting honours went to Williams, for the Sixth, and Mason, for the Transitus, but the batting as a whole was rather patchy especially among the tail of last year's Transitus.

Serenity.

The path winds through a field of pensive cows,
And skirts a bubbling spring marked by a stone,
And still ascends through scrub of deeper tone
Than those surrounding fields, and through a copse
Of firs, wherein the mountain sheep can browse
In dappled sunlight 'neath the swaying tops.

The narrow track now takes another course,
And climbs obliquely through the tangled bush,
Whilst all around descends the evening hush,
And all is silent ; not a sound beneath,
No bee comes humming through the stretch of gorse
That reaches to the heather-covered heath.

The path now ends abruptly, but a way,
Worn by the feet of many mountain sheep,
Ascends through clumps of ling where rabbits sleep.
But now upon the topmost crest I stand,
And view the glittering sea so far away,
While far below there lies the chequered land.

Yet all is silenced in the rosy glow
The sun in dying splendour sheds around,
And far beneath, the fertile fields that bound
The island to the North, are fields of gold,
The sleepy hamlet nestling there below,
Looks like a town from fairy tales of old.

G.L.

A Simpler Story.

THERE was once a young man called Mr. Mardyke who had no money with which to go to the barber's shop so he let his hair grow long and so his young lady said oh you are a poet and he blushed and said sometimes they do.

And she said make one about me and he said alright I will thy golden hair doth bind my heart thine eyes doth slay my soul all other sweets are only tart thyself doth erst my soul you see its quite spontaneous.

And he said is that alright and she said lovely oh Richard make one about you and he said alright a sad one this time oh why doth thy bluid red hand oh Richard, Richard Richard oh mither mither mither forsooth i'bluid an' sand oh you see that sort is easy.

Then she said that's fine you had better send them to the School Magazine because they will print anything there and he said I will they do and so he did and they didn't and he killed his young lady and killed the editor of the School Magazine and stopped being a poet and lived happily ever after.

THE END.

A Short Lament.

Remember, remember the days of thy youth,
Those far away days that for ever are shed ;
Remember, remember the gay times forsooth,
And those blessed hours when we dallied or read.

Strange footsteps are heard in the hall of the great,
And the face that we knew no longer is seen.
Good fortune has left us ; attended by Fate
We must work under eyes that are piercingly keen.

No more can we dream, for our whole work is doubled,
No more can we frivol or crack jokes instead,
But five hundred loines as a threat leaves us troubled,
So with L — and V— we push on ahead.

VTH FORM.

The Library.

ALTHOUGH the Library has by now, in the main, finished its activities for the term, we think it not out of place to remind our readers that next term they will have plenty of time for reading and should make use of the Fiction Library and the Subject Libraries.

We must make an appeal to those who read papers in the Library to refrain from producing ancient papers from their hiding places : it is somewhat disconcerting when looking for yesterday's "Times" to find a "Daily Telegraph" of six month's age in the .most conspicuous position. Moreover the younger brethren who read the story-books on the far tables will persist in transporting them to the main reading table.

The Librarian will be obliged if all those who find faults in the Card Index System will report them to him.

THE LIBRARY.

REVIEWS.

CLASSICS.

Plutarch's Lives. In reviewing the English translation of Plutarch's Lives of Greek and Roman heroes a departure is being made from the usual practice. Hitherto only works by modern classical scholars on Greek and Roman subjects have been reviewed. There is indeed little purpose in reviewing English translations of classical authors. But the "Lives" of Plutarch calls for special recommendation. Probably no historian of ancient times has been more widely read or has had a greater influence than this keen-witted historical essayist and biographer. Plutarch's "Lives" has been called "the food of great souls," because of the wealth of wisdom it contains, and it formed the inexhaustible storehouse of fascinating stories from which Shakespeare drew the plots of several of his plays. Plutarch was mot a critical historian. He was interested primarily in character, and so he blended fact and legend into a tangle which only modern scholarship has been able to separate. But despite this defect, his biographies remain one of the foremost sources of information about classical antiquity. Young and old for centuries have delighted in rearing them for their enthralling incidents and their masterly sketches of character.

L.N.W.

MODERN LANGUAGES.

Spain, by S. de Madariaga.—-(Modern World Series).—This notable contribution to the "Modern World" series has all the qualities which we might properly expect in the book of a highly intelligent patriot in his own country. Who else would have so blended patriotism with irony as to point the moral that the opposition at Geneva to Spain's claim to a permanent seat on the Council of the League reflected the world's idea of a Great Power as purely materialistic-economic and military ? Surely, the author argues, Spain, "the empire-builder retired from business" has the experience no less than a tradition of universality and universal interests which makes her eminently suitable for the task of honest broker—-"or are petrol and coal to count more than language and civilization ?"

In the first part there is a masterly analysis of the Spanish Empire which was founded on the basis of religious unity. We should remember that neither Ferdinand and Isabella nor their successors sought to fuse the political and social institutions of the separate realms. 7 he process of assimilation began in the eighteenth century under a French dynasty. Only by bearing in mind this incubus of the French influence can we understand the unreality of the political conflicts in the past century—and Catalanism. fit this part we are introduced also to the spontaneous humanism of the Spaniards, a race whose "illiterates speak like Seneca, sing like Blake, and behave like Louis XIV I "

In Part II. we have a glowing tribute to the pioneers of real education in Spain, Don Francisco Giner de los Rios and his successors working through the Committee for the Development of Studies (Junta para Ampliacion de Estudios), who have "rescued Spanish culture from the barren pastures of clericalism". Besides working in the university, the new influence has brought into being a number of unusually live literary newspapers. Joaquin Costa, Angel Ganivet Miguel de Unamuno, Ortega y Gasset, Galdos, these and other members of 1898 generation are portrayed here. There has been a sudden rise in economic vitality during the last thirty years ; the chapters on agriculture, industry and commerce are particularly interesting, In the section dealing with the elements of the reign of Alphonso XIII, the agrarian question, the labour situation, clericalism and militarism are set before us. No fewer than three chapters are devoted to the Catalan problem—the psychological background, the historical background, and the present position There is an exceptionally good exposition of relations with Portugal, the operations in Morocco, and the meaning of Spanish-Americanism. Whilst convinced that the Parliamentary regime was abolished just as it was making good, Professor Madariaga is very fair to General Prino de Rivera. He thinks that King Alphonso has only himself to blame for the present situation.

The author does help us to understand a country which standing outside the main stream of European life, remains for most of us mysterious. It ought to be so no longer.

R. H. W.

HISTORY.

The Old Regime in France,—F. Funck Brentano,—This very necessary book has been introduced to the History Library this term. M. Funck Brentano goes most carefully into the life of the French people of the old regime, from the King down to the humblest peasant.

The old regime sprang from society in a state of feudalism. During the 9th and 10th centuries, the successive invasions of barbarians, Normans, Hungarians and Saracens, had plunged the country into a state of anarchy in which all its institutions had foundered. The work of reconstructing society took place under the influence of the only organized force which could remain intact,—the Family. The Family is the core of the old. regime.

Interesting chapters are included on the Seigneurie, the Town the Village, and " lettres de Cachet," most of which show painstaking research on the part of the author, much new matter being given. The work is amply illustrated with examples and Retif de la Bretonne's famous dicta on the peasants conditions are frequently quoted.

Coming to the causes of the French Revolution, M. Brentano refuses to believe that it was inevitable. If Louis XV. had lived, or if Louis XVI. had had more determination in choosing his Ministers and crushing opposition, reforms could have been introduced making force unnecessary. As it was, it is important to notice that the first recourse to revolutionary violence was instigated by the nobles in 1775.

Viewed as a whole, the book is a mine of facts for the student of the France of the Ancient Regime. Unlike many French writers, M. Funck Brentano adds to the value of his statements by proving them.

House Notes.

ARUNDEL—

We opened the term with the knowledge that we had some good material in the House, but our period of transition is not yet over, and signs of it have been seen in some of the cricket matches. Nevertheless at the present time we have won three of the six First Eleven matches, all by good margins, whilst the loss against Welbeck came very near to victory. A good number will be available next year, and we should then be well in the running for the championship. The second Eleven has pulled round, as shown by a decisive win over Welbeck. Our efforts in the Swimming Sports show a fair level of keenness, but we have provided no great feats therein. Here too we are hoping for better luck next year.

We are sorry to lose Philip, who will spend next year at Queen's, Oxford, where we wish him the best of luck.

CHATSWORTH—

We have had only a fair cricket season, if position in the table is considered. but all the matches have been enjoyable. We played an important part, however, in deciding the winning house. Chatsworth, or should we say Credland, gave Wentworth an unexpected set-back and so demoralised them that they lost to Arundel the following week, thus losing the casket by one point. Against Sherwood we gained a very comfortable victory scoring 152 to their 20, yet we finish below them in points, truly the bugbear of all competitive sport. Credland and Marsden have to a large extent shared the bowling with final averages of 13 wickets for 138 runs and 21 for 179 respectively. Credland has also been able to return the good batting average of 35, including individual innings of 110, 68, and 53. The team as a whole is very young and all save two will probably play again for the House next year. The fielding has been consistently good, sometimes brilliant. Of the younger "hopes" Slack has an average of 12.7 for 7 complete innings, and Tetley has taken 6 wickets at a cost of 5.5 apiece. The House 2nd XI are well on the way to winning their cup, with five wins out of the five possible. We hope to extol their glories in the autumn magazine when complete results will be to hand.

In swimming and fives the House has done quite well. We gained the second position in the inter-house swimming competition with a convincing lead of 00 points ahead of Wentworth who were third. Our congratulations for this go largely to Marsden, Green and Holden who won the Open 100 yards free style, the "under 14" breast stroke, and the "under 14" free style respectively. The House Relay team was second and the "under 14" team first in their events. Thus in swimming, as in football and cricket, we may look forward to cup-winning teams of 1931 or 1932. In fives the House pair, Credland and Cumming offered the sternest opposition to Welbeck and nearly succeeded in wresting the trophy from them, the scores being 15-13, 9-15 and 12-15. Cumming reached the final of the Open Competition, but was badly off his game. We take this opportunity of bidding a regretful farewell to Credland and Marsden who whether by centuries, marvellous bowling feats or sliding-tackles have served the House so well. May they always have the best' of luck.

CLUMBER—

Clumber has won the Cricket casket. This at the moment is the most important source of joy. The House has gained 11 points out of a possible 14, the drop of 3 points being due to three draws, with Welbeck, Wentworth and Sherwood. We must thank the Bateman brothers for their steady support with the bat, and Bateman A. W. for his proficiency with the ball. Taylor has been invaluable ; it is chiefly due to his excellent bowling that our opponents have been dismissed with such rapidity. Bolsover too, has, on occasion, shown his usefulness with the ball, but he is rather erratic and should be more useful in a year or two. Our thanks must also be given to Burton, Speakman and Hubbard who have saved us more than once, the latter with the bat as well as behind the stumps. The team, too, may be congratulated on its improvement in the field. We were never brilliant, but the improvement was very marked. In the Swimming Sports, Clumber was fourth. There were 19 boys in the House who could swim at least 20 yards, and although this number was the third highest, it is pot remarkable, and we hope to see it improved in subsequent years. Tyas must be congratulated on winning the open breast-stroke, Walton on being second in the under 14 back-stroke, and Moore on being third in the long plunge. ('lumber did not shine in the relay race, but the absence of Cole was felt here. Turning from sports to the class-room, we have fresh results to record. We must congratulate 1 . L. M. Millar on winning a Robert Styring Scholarship, and J. A. Taylor on gaining a Technical Studentship at Sheffield University. R. J. Gaunt also changed his Robert Styring Scholarship, won last year, for an Edgar Allen Scholarship. These three successes raise the number of scholarships won by Clumber this year to ten. This we contend, is a record. It is at any rate, a list of which we may be justifiably proud. It has been, indeed, an excellent year for Clumber. The failure at football has been wiped out by the retention of the Senior Running Cup, and the winning of the Cricket Casket. Runners up in the Athletic Sports and fourth in the Swimming Sports, we can also record individual successes like that of Moore in the former and Tyas in the latter. In the classroom we have not sacrificed brains to brawn. Scholarships have been won by E. G. Turner, R. F. Tyas, R. T. Gaunt, E. L. Moore, E. L., M. Millar, and T. A. Taylor, and we have the honour of providing four out of the eleven Prefects.

It is, therefore, with regret that we bid farewell to F. G. Turner, R. -T. Tyas, R. T. Gaunt, E. L. Moore and F. L. M. Millar. We wish them every success, both at their respective universities and elsewhere.

HADDON—

The cricket season has not been too successful for the house, neither for the First nor the Second Eleven. Nevertheless, several of the youngsters have shown distinct promise, and we have hopes of building up a team for the future. In the Swimming Sports, we were again not outstanding. We must make up for this term's deficiencies during the football season. We must congratulate S. Miles on winning a Robert Styring Scholarship, and J. A. Hopkinson on being awarded a Technical Studentship at Sheffield University. P. Allen is leaving us at the end of this term, He is going to find new worlds to conquer up at Cambridge, and I am sure we all wish him every success in his new sphere. Speaking of success, Haddon seems to have lifted most of the form prizes this term. We must keep up this excellent show of brains.

(We feel bound in honour, however, to reveal a certain ignorance of the rules of English grammar on the part of one member of the First Eleven. He was distinctly heard to say ; "People don't like being breathed down their neck on ! ")

LYNWOOD—

The Cricket XI has not fared as well as one expected, and the chief fault lies in lack of discipline. Even at Bent's Green it would be as well to treat a 1st XI House Match seriously. At the Swimming Sports, we lost the Melling Cup, but Wragg is to be congratulated on winning the Long Plunge. To turn to the realms of study we should like to congratulate Burley on winning the Chemistry Prize. Next term more preparation for the Social would be welcomed. The affair last year was a success largely owing to the efforts of outsiders, and the boys of the House did very little in the way of entertainment. That should not be repeated next time.

SHERWOOD—

The House so far has had a, fairly successful term. The 1st Eleven has improved considerably, and succeeded in beating Welbeck in its third match. So far it has won 3 and lost 3 matches. The 2nd Eleven has been very successful this term ; it has won all its matches so far, and consequently has bright hopes of winning the 2nd Eleven Cricket Cup. In the Swimming Heats we gained 50 points, having 25 swimmers in the House. This shows a great improvement, and it is to be hoped that it will continue. At present we are awaiting the results of the Swimming Sports. We regret to announce that we are to lose Laughton at the end of this term, we wish him every success.

WELBECK—

Owing to the splendid efforts of Tilbrook and Blatherwick the House easily won the Swimming Championship. In the open events Tilbrook was 1st in the back stroke, 2nd in the free style, 3rd in the breast, and 2nd in the neat (living and style swimming. Blatherwick in the 14-16 events was 1st in the free style and back, 3rd in the breast, and in the open events 1st in neat diving and style swimming, and 2nd in the long plunge. There was, however, a noticeable lack of young swimmers. The same relay team which just lost to Lynwood in the Autumn Term won by several yards.

The fives Team (Tilbrook and Williams) won the Fives Competition for the House for the third successive year. Chatsworth is the semi-final put up a very strong fight.

The cricket season has been a moderate one, the first eleven having four wins and a draw to their credit and the second eleven three wins.

There was a good attendance of scouts at the Derwent camp, and some of them have been making very good progress this term.

WENTWORTH—

The end of a very enjoyable cricket season. Congratulations to the younger members of the team who have come to the rescue on more than one occasion. Whiteley Woods has not been the same without our Housemaster, but we are delighted to hear of his good progress and hope to see him in the very near future. Let us hope the footer season will meet with more success in the forthcoming season.

Notices.

Contributions for the Magazine should be addressed to the EDITOR, SCHOOL MAGAZINE, K.E.S. A box will also be found in the School Library into which all communications may be put.

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The Editor will be glad to be kept informed of the doings of O.Es.—especially those in distant parts of the world—in order that the Magazine may form a link between them and the School.

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