S.R.G.S. v. SHEFFIELD CLERGY.

CLERGY.

J. W. MERRYWEATHER.
REV. E. V. EVERARD. REV. G. OSBORNE. REV. P. E. LORD.
REV. C. F. KNIGHT. REV. A BAINES.
REV. C. C. ELLIS. REV. N. E. DAY. REV. C. E. JULIAN. REV. S. SCOTT.

S.R.G.S.

W. K. DALTON.        MR. G. LEWIS.
J. L. COCKAYNE. MR. F. L. OVEREND. E. W. L. THOMAS.
MR. J. H. HODGETTS.
MR. G. W. HUMPHREYS. MR. G. H. MERRIKIN. C. A. BARTON.
MR. S. G. NICHOLSON.    W. FROGGATT.

VOL. XI.]        JULY, 1900.    [No. 8.

EDITORIAL

THE present seems an unusually busy and eventful term; eventful nationally and eventful to us as a School. The boys of the S.R.G.S. have done their share in celebrating those history-making events which have stirred the whole nation : they have joined in the " wearing of the green " and also other colours typical of loyalty and patriotism ; they have displayed more buttons (of an emblematical kind) than ever adorned the person of Mr. Sloppy ; they have appeared decked in a variety of forms of vegetable life, from oak to watercress, and they've shouted " Rule Britannia," and they've sung " God save the Queen:" albeit the latter on one occasion seemed like some of the bowling " to lack sting." This last suggests a reference, not altogether laudatory, to the cricket. The season is now advanced and we still look for that improvement in several cases that we expected and hoped for. Our fellows, particularly the XI, are not nearly keen enough, and unfortunately some of them are inclined to rise superior to instruction. Several players have a perfectly bad style sticking to them through the season, which they ought to have got rid of long before this, and might have done so had they heeded advice offered to them. The net practice is frequently a farce and only tends to perpetuate the faulty style displayed by most of our choices, who seem with Touchstone to prefer
" an ill-favoured thing, sir, but mine own."

We hope to see all this altered next year, to which the acquisition of another field should greatly contribute. The scheme for the purchase of a site in Whiteley Woods is now before the public, and notwithstanding that the present is not an ideal time for raising another fund in addition to the many already in existence, very substantial progress has been and continues to be made.

The rest of the term will be passed in an atmosphere of examination, of which in fact several of our number have already had a preliminary whiff. We hope that as this is our first examination as a School by the Oxford Delegacy, the fellows will rise to the occasion and achieve good results all along the line, following the excellent example set by our O.Bs. at the Universities.

FRIDAY, June 1st, was the day appointed for the 33rd anniversary of the school sports. The sky was cloudy, but although rain threatened several times, the weather remained favourable. As usual, there was a large concourse of visitors, who watched the events with considerable interest. The band of the "Queen's Own" Yorkshire Dragoons was in attendance, and discoursed melodious strains, under the direction of Lieut. Suckley. The officials were as follows:­President: President: The Vicar of Sheffield; Vice-Presidents: The Governors, the Lord Mayor (S. Roberts, Esq.), Sir Henry Stephenson, the Rt. Hon. C. B, Stuart Wortley, Q.C., M.P., Ald. W. H. Brittain, J.P., J. Newton Coombe, Esq., Sir W. Leng, Ald. Clegg, Councillor Derry, A. Wightman, Esq., H. P. Marsh, Esq., J.P., J. W. Martin, Esq., M.D., F. Lee, Esq., Rev. A. B. Haslam, M.A. Judges : A. B. Chambers, Esq., H. P. Marsh, Esq., C. Robinson, Esq., F. Harrison, Esq., J. H. Hodgetts, Esq., M.A. Starters : W. T. Campsall, Esq., J. Dickson, Esq. Clerks of the Course : J. C. Auty, Esq., F. H. Bramley, Esq., E. Pode, Esq. Timekeepers : Rev. J. St. L. Blakeney, M.A., E. Thomas, Esq. Treasurer : G. W. Humphreys, Esq., B.A. Hen. Secs.: G. H. Merrikin, Esq., B.A., Davies I, Dalton. Committee : The Masters, R. Brown, J. G. Chambers, J. L. Cockayne, C. S. Coombe, E. Thomas, J. P. Wild, B. Cockayne, L. Coombe, G. M. Cornu, A. Clementson, J. A. Crowther, W. S. Andrew, C. A. Barton.

There was a larger number of entries than has been the case for several years. All the races were well contested, and the interest was kept up throughout the whole of the sports. The times were, in several cases, somewhat slow compared with those of previous years ; but the jumps were with one exception very creditable.

The prizes were distributed by the Lady Mayoress, to whom a bouquet was presented by Davies I, the champion. The customary vote of thanks was proposed by Archdeacon Eyre, and replied to by the Lord Mayor in a short speech. The proceedings terminated with the National Anthem.

1. Bicycle Race, 5 laps (Handicap, Open).-This race was won by Davies I, followed by Barton, who rode very well, at a distance of 25 yards : both riding from scratch. Tasker I, starting at 200 yards, finished third, a minute after Davies. Time, 5 min.-the same as in 1898.

2. Bicycle Race, 3 laps (Handicap, under 15).-1, Kirk I, scratch ; 2, Moorwood II, 150 yards start ; 12 yards separated the two. Time, 2 min. 58 sec.-an improvement on previous results.

3. Bicycle Race, 2 laps (Handicap, under 13).-1, Tasker II ; 2, Tasker I ; 3, Huxley. These three finished all together, after a very pretty race. Time, 2 min. 4 sec.

4. Tortoise Race.-1, Barton ; 2, Huxley. Owing to a certain amount of " fouling" which occurred in this race, the contest for second place was re-run at the school.

[The above races were run at Bramall Lane, on Friday, May 25th.]

5. Throwing the Cricket Ball (Open).-Some very good throws were given in this event, although some of the competitors aimed far too low. The telephone wires overhead proved a great nuisance, stopping several good shots. Barton obtained the first prize with a fine throw of 77 yards ; Rickett second, with 68 yards 2 feet.

6. 100 Yards (Open).-(Challenge Cup, presented by J. P. Wild, Esq.)-This was a very close race, the three leaders coming in all together. Davies I was first, Plowright second, and Moorwood I third. The time was 13 sec.-somewhat longer than last year's.

7. High Jump (under 14).-First, Proctor, who cleared 4 ft. 3in. ; Wilkins, second, jumped very neatly, stopping at 4 ft. 1 in.

8. High Jump (Open).-(Challenge Cup, presented by Rev. A. B. Haslam, M.A.)-Won by Davies I, jumping 4 ft. 7 in., the same as last year ; 2, Dunnill ; 3, Davies II. The winner could certainly have improved on this; but having his eye upon a certain shield, wisely saved himself for other events.

9. 220 Yards Handicap (Preparatory School).-Moorwood II was first, closely followed by Tasker I (scratch). The time, 35 sec., was slightly more than it has been for several years.

10. 100 Yards Hurdle.-(Challenge Cup, presented by H. P. Marsh, Esq., J.P.)-1, Davies I ; 2, Davies IT; 3, Froggatt. All the five competitors cleared the hurdles well. If Froggatt had put on speed after the last hurdle, he would have certainly gained the second place, if not the first.

11. Long Jump (under 14).-This jump was well contested, Twigg and Coggon remaining equal for several turns. It was finally won by Twigg ; Coggon being second. The distance was 13 ,ft. 8 in.

12. Long Jump (Open),-This was an extremely poor event, Froggatt, who was first, only managing 13 ft. 4 in., being 4 in. less than the "under 14" jump, and 3 ft. 4 in. less than last year's result. Hooson was second, with 13 ft. 2 in.

13. One Mile Race (Open).-(Challenge Cup, presented by the Rt. Hon. C. B. Stuart Wortley, Q.C., M.P.)-Five competitors turned out for this race, but it was evident from the beginning that it lay between Plowright and Dunnill. A grand race followed, which was cleverly won by Plowright, who breasted the tape a few inches ahead of his rival. The time, 5 min. 52 sec., shows that it was a record for the school ground.

14. 100 Yards (under 14).--Heat 1 : 1, Coggon ; 2, Wilkins. Heat 2: 1, Proctor; 2, Hallam. Heat 3: 1, Hartle; 2, Howell. Final: 1, Hartle; 2, Coggon. Time, 14.5 sec.

15. Old Boys' 220 Yards Race.-Six O.Bs. entered for this race - a decided improvement on previous years. Cornu was first, Johnstone making a fair second. Time, 27 sec.

16. 100 Yards (Preparatory School).-Heat 1 : 1, Moorwood III ; 2, Carrington. Heat 2 : 1, Tasker I ; 2, Tasker II. Final : 1, Car­rington ; 2, Moorwood III.

17. Quarter Mile (Open).-(Challenge Cup, presented by H. L. Brown, Esq.)-Owing to the fatigue of the mile, Plowright and Dun­nill fell out early in this race, leaving Davies I first and Moorwood I second. Time, 604 secs.

18. Quarter Mile (under 15).-This was a well-contested race, Cockayne II being first and Burton second, with Hallam a good third. Time, 711 secs.

19. 220 Yards Handicap.-Heat 1 : 1, Davies III (20 yards); 2, Kirk II (25 yards). Heat 2 : 1, Froggatt 1(5 yards) ; 2, Plowright (3 yards). Final : 1, Froggatt ; 2, Plowright, Kirk II a good third. Time, 294 secs.

20. Sack Race, 80 yards.-There were only eight entries for this race, so it was run in one heat only. Preston was first ; Dean, who came in second, was disqualified, Moorwood II taking his place.

21. Three-Legged Race, 220 yards.-The judges being unable to decide the winners of this race, it was run a second time, when Mawhood and Coggon were adjudged first, and Moorwood I and Moorwood II second.

22. Half-Mile Handicap.-As Plowright and Dunnill again dropped out, the race was won by Hartle (60 yards) who promises to make a good runner, Davies I (25 yards) being second. The time (2 min. 18 sec.) was very good.

23. Obstacle Race (Open).-1, Davies II ; 2, Davies III. Won easily.

24. Obstacle Race (under 14).-Heat 1: 1, Proctor ; 2, Twigg. Heat 2: 1, Maples, 2, Banham. Final: 1, Maples, 2, Proctor. Had Proctor been quicker in getting across the horizontal net, he would probably have won this race.

25. Consolation Race (Senior).-1, Merryweather ; 2, Bagshawe. 26. Consolation Race (Junior).-1, Simpson ; 2, Kirk II.

The Fives Challenge Cup (presented by the Ven. Archdeacon Eyre) was won by V. Proctor.

The Championship Shield (presented by F. H. Bramley, Esq.) was taken by Davies I, who obtained 60 points (winning the 100 yards, Quarter-Mile, Hurdles, and High Jump). The other competitors were as follows:-Plowright (40 pts.), Dunnill (19 pts.); Moorwood I (14 pts.), Froggatt, Barton, and Davies II (10 pts. each), Hartle (7 pts.), Hooson and Rickett (5 pts. each).

The following true story was told to the writer by a gentleman who had lived many years among the Gonds, and received this account from one of the natives who took part in it.

THE Gonds are remnants of the ancient aboriginal inhabitants of India, who now dwell in the hilly districts of Central India. They are Nature-worshippers, very simple and primitive in their manners and customs, and exceedingly timid, as the following story will shew.

One day messengers came from a certain village saying that a Government Official (they believe every white man to be a Government Official) had recently arrived there and wished all the people of the neighbouring villages to assemble at his village on such and such a day late in the evening. This news caused a great commotion among the villagers. Forthwith the chief man of the village, the village watchman, and all the elders of the people came together in solemn conclave to discuss the situation. It was evident they could not refuse to comply with the white man's wishes, for a Government Official was a terrible person. The Government-that almighty unseen power-what an awe-inspiring thing it was! Even their own native policeman, who was surely one of the least of the Government's servants, was exceedingly bumptious and fond of exercising his authority. He expected them to allow him to take their goats and fowls without paying anything for them ; for, of course, he was the Government, and the Government was everything ! How much more then, they argued, would the real white Government Officials exact from them. So on no account could they refuse to obey, even though they had not the slightest idea for what reason they had been summoned.

After much debate it was decided that only the head man of the village, the village watchman, and the elders of the people should go to appease the wrath of the almighty Official, while the bulk of the population remained at home.

So on the day appointed, the head man of the village, the village watch­man, and all the elders of the people proceeded in fear and trepidation to the village where the Government Official resided. On their arrival they were taken to a large place where the head men, the village watchmen, and all the elders of the surrounding villages were assembled ; but, strange to say, there was not one representative of the village to which they had come. This looked decidedly suspicious! As they arrived the new comers were told to go further forward and sit as close together as possible. That also looked suspicious !

Straight in front of them was a gigantic white sheet stretching right along so that they could go no further in that direction. What could it be ? What was it for ? What was the Official going to do ? No one could say. No one had ever seen anything like it before, except-oh, horrors ! one man suggested that it was very like-a net for snaring rabbits ! It was so large they could not possibly pass it or climb over; clearly it was put there to prevent their escape.

Presently something behind attracted their attention. There was a large black thing-oh, indescribably mysterious !-which had a very suspicious look about it. What could it be ? Soon one of the white men, who were standing by, struck a light; with the flash of the light an idea came into the mind of one of the head men-it was a new kind of English gun and was put there to kill them ! That was why none of the Gonds to whose village they had come were present, they had smelt danger; that was why they had been crowded up in front of the " gun "; that was why the gigantic " rabbit net " was placed in front to prevent their escape ; it was clear they ought to lose no time in getting out of it. So the head man got up and went over to one of the attendants who had been shewing them to their places. " I wish to go a little way round the corner on business," said he, " I shall be back in a minute," " Very well," said the attendant, and the " head man" fled away as fast as his legs could carry him to his own village.

Next the village watchman, seeing the head man depart, guessed " what was up" and immediately followed his example. This was too much for the elders; all jumping up they took to their heels, and without making any excuse fled back to their own village in shivering panic.

What happened afterwards no one can say with certainty, as the witness of the incident took to flight among the first; but whilst the head man, the village watchman, and all the elders of the people were cowering in their village, expecting every moment that the dreaded Official would arrive with an army to punish them for their desertion, some of their neighbours who had remained behind, being too frightened to run away, brought the strangest reports about what had taken place. No one had been killed. But most wonderful things had happened ! All one's thoughts, all one had ever seen and had not seen walked on to the sheet and off again, and everyone got home in safety.

Needless to say a great load was taken off the minds of the head man, the village watchman, and all the elders of the people, for after all, as our readers have doubtless guessed already, the " gun" was only a magic lantern, the rabbit net " merely an innocent sheet ; while there is good reason to believe that the dreaded Official was one of those ferocious beings-missionaries. That was why the men of his own village, discovering that he would do them no harm if they did not come, never turned up at the meeting.

As the Government did not punish the villagers for running away, no doubt they have somewhat modified their ideas of our officials as well as our magic lanterns.   

W. A. B. C.

Clare College, Cambridge,
July 10th, 1900.

Dear Mr. Editor,

The Cambridge Letter of this term will, I fear, scarcely be of the length that you would expect seeing the number of events that have taken place, but if this is so put it down to my inexperience with regard to writing long letters.

First of all, I will refer to the doings of the School representatives here. Eyre, who must be mentioned first by reason of his seniority, has not been in residence this term. He has been coaching down in Hampshire for the first part of the Theological Special, in which I was happy to find that he had proved eminently successful. His absence has been felt by his College in tennis and that in spite of the large number of good players of which Emmanuel can boast.

Norwood has fulfilled every expectation. In addition to his obtaining the Powis Medal for Latin Verse he was third in the list for the Greek Verse Medal. The May Examinations of his College have brought him only further honour, for in them he gained an easy victory over all his competitors and has now the privilege of calling himself both scholar and prizeman of John's. This term he may often have been seen on the Queen's high road, or oftener still propelling a frail bark through the murky waters of the placid Cam.

Our two representatives at Corpus, Pate and Goodhart, have also upheld the best traditions of the School.

Pate, after a good year's solid work, has succeeded in vanquishing the classical scholars, for in addition to coming out first in the May Examinations, he obtained a silver cup for a brilliant Latin Declama­tion. He was at the same time awarded a scholarship to augment his sizarship.

Of Goodhart's successes, for I feel sure that they were successes, I cannot yet speak definitely, as the result of the History Mays is not yet to hand.

As for myself I have just managed to retain my position as first Mathematical Scholar in my College. Like Norwood and Pate, I also can call myself both scholar and prizeman.

With the exception of Norwood- and he too is wavering in opinion-we have all taken to tennis, but as yet have achieved no great results.

The three great events of the term, falling as they did in one and the same week, rather disconcerted our work for the time being. The events in question were the visit of the King of Sweden to receive the honorary degree of LL.D. ; the celebration over the Relief of Mafeking, and the heavy defeat of the 'Varsity cricket team by Yorkshire.

To fully describe the rejoicings to which the news of the Relief of Mafeking gave rise a more facile pen than mine would be required. During the week-the celebrations took place on a Saturday-a huge stack of wood, straw, barrels of tar, and all manner of inflammable material was erected on one of the large commons with which Cam­bridge abounds. A plan of campaign, too, had been drawn up, consisting of a torchlight procession to escort an effigy of Kruger to its funeral pyre. The deputy mayor was to have started the conflagration as soon as the effigy was in position. Unfortunately, however, an enthusiast hurled a firebrand into the midst of the huge mass long before the arrival of the procession, and so by the time the effigy with its escort arrived flames were already shooting upwards to a height of over fifty feet. The heat caused by the fire was so great that no one could approach near enough to throw anything on. In my estimation quite twenty thousand people were present, and when these started singing " God Save the Queen " one could well judge to what depth of feeling the present war has given rise.

The capture of Johannesburg and Pretoria, even though occurring in term time, did not give rise to any great enthusiasm ; in fact, one might well say that the news was received with perfect apathy.

The 'Varsity Cricket team this year has not covered itself with glory except in the match against Oxford, The bowling has been woefully weak, and at times the batsmen have altogether failed. In the Oxford match, however, the batsmen proved themselves equal, if anything a little superior, to their opponents, for our average per wicket was a little higher than that of Oxford.

News from the School has been scanty, but yet we have received some from time to time. The achievements of the cricket team have filled us with pleasure, and we all congratulate the School on the brilliant win over Doncaster. It seems a pity that Barton, who has proved himself to be such a very destructive bowler, was unable to play last year.

In work, too, the School has not been behindhand, and I must congratulate Preston and Barnes on their respective successes in the recent examinations at University College.

With best wishes for future successes both in work and sport. Believe me, ever yours,

OTTO GLAUERT.

St. Catharine's,
June 18th, 1900.

Dear Mr. Editor,

Of course this term is generally conspicuous, so far as the 'Varsity is concerned ; but this year there has been the war which has acted in two ways on the events customary up here at this period of the year. It has deprived us of what most men look forward to, namely, Commem and the conferring of honorary degrees ; by way of counter-balancing this loss we got several " rags " during the enthusiastic rejoicings over the relief of that heroic outpost of our Empire.

In those days Oxford was conspicuous for torchlight processions, ` bonners," the abuse of flags, and a few cases of assaulting the guardians of the law. This later incident was no doubt brought about by a foolish action on the part of the civil authorities, namely, the importation of police. Why should I narrate these deeds-? For the news-purveyors have scattered them throughout the land, though with a great amount of exaggeration and a sparse show of truth.

Then came " Eights' Week," and that pandemonium of colour which thronged the various places of interest and antiquity, or trooped out to view the races or cricket match.

On the river I believe a record was made in regard to the first division, for almost every boat changed its place.

Magdalen bumped New at the start and successfully held the post of honour thus obtained. New finished second, with Univ. third, though there was very little between them. B.N.C. came next, with Worcester and Pembroke following. Of the others Oriel made five " bumps," whilst 11 the House " gained distinction by being bumped each day.

One thing was very evident from the " Eights," namely, that as the " man in the street " put it, we did not send our best eight to Putney. The " Blues," as a whole, failed to do themselves justice.

The XI has been going strong, defeating Webbe's Eleven, London County, (in which match W. G. was hit six times in succession over the ropes by the 'Varsity Captain), and Sussex. I think we shall give the Cantabs a hard task to lick us. We have Worcester and Surrey to face yet.

There has also occurred the Inspection of the Volunteers by the Officer commanding the Regimental district. The corps, which is now nearly seven hundred strong, went through the various operations required, including the attack ; in fact in appearance they looked the embodiment of everything formidable and destructive.

The " Schools " have been in full blast this last ten days, and continue for some time longer. Both Williams and Senior have little entertainments to attend.

Several 'Varsity men have been killed and wounded at the seat of war during the last few days, chiefly serving with the Duke of Cambridge's Special Corps or in Paget's Horse.

With best wishes to the old School, and success to the Eleven.

Yours sincerely,

C. W. DODSON.

An undiscovered epic by P. Vergilius Maro, Esq.
Translated into English Verse by J. A. CROWTHER.

LIBER I.

Argument: The Grammarians hold their Annual Sports on the Kalends of
June. The Sports described.

Lo I am he who tuned the song through slender reed to cry,
And then come forth from out the woods, the fields that are thereby
In tuneful verse I bade obey the hungry tiller's need,
And then I sang of baneful war, and Mars and dreadful deed.
But now a loftier theme than these my harp assays to try,
I sing the bold Grammarians of days not long gone by.

Near the pleasant town of Hallam, built on hills at least four score,
Stands a grove of high Minerva rich with knowledge' plenteous store,
There crowds of youths assemble, with their youthful lusty frames,
To drink in streams of knowledge, and to vie in manly games.
Each year, to treat the country-side to sights both strange and fair,

A festal day is fixed, and for the " Sports " they all prepare ;
Bartonius king of mortals, and Merryweather strong,
Young Proctor lithe and active, and Davisian the long ;
Yea Davisian the doughty, and Plowright strong and fleet.

And now the looked for day was come, with simple light and sweet;
From all the neighbouring regions fast the thronging crowds do press
In graceful summer costumes, and their go-to-meeting dress.
At grave Minerva's urgent call the gods themselves attend,
And with the gazing townfolk in one mighty crowd do blend.
Great Jupiter, the lord of all, appeared upon the scene,
While mighty Mars and Faunus promenaded on the green.
Apollo, too, was present with the mighty murmuring throng,
Humpherius the doughty, and Mercurius the strong ;
Merricinus the eager, burdened with affairs of state,
Was thereby much detained, and so did not arrive till late.

And now the clear and trusty bell rings out the fateful hour,
(Humpherius the eager, wields the bell with strength and power)
Then whosoever had the will to strive in speedy race
Cast off superfluous attire and sought the starting place ;
Davisian and Dunnill, and Plowright, swift as horse;
A hundred yards the race to run, a hundred yards the course.
Now, to ! they take their places due, and when the sign they hear
Forthwith they leave the bar behind and o'er the course they bear.
Like drift of storm cloud on they go. Right pleasant is the scene.
(The band strikes up the plaintive tune called " Soldiers of the Queen".)
But far before all other men Davisian outflies
The very whistling of the winds, and earns the foremost prize.
But Plowright, swift and speedy. presses the victor hot,
And leaving all the rest behind, he gains the second lot.

Again the bell, with ringing tones, summons the men to strive,
The course again a hundred yards, but over hurdles five ;
Davisian again is first, of hindrance recks he not ;
Swifter than lightning on the wing he scoops the foremost lot.

But who shall sing the struggle on the green and flagrant plain
When the brazen-lunged disturber of the peace rang forth again.
In open race, a full mile long, this time the warriors vied,
And all were eager for the prize, and would not be denied ;
Plowright was there, and Hartle, and Dunnill was hard by,
And sweetly-smiling Bagshawe Even meant to have a try.
First Plowright, sure and speedy, from the starting breaks away,
For many rolling weeks had he been training for that day ;
But Dunnill with young Plowright for the victory will contest,
And soon he caught the leader up; they struggle breast to breast.
Then all the mighty circling crowd, as round the field they fly,
Madly wave their umbrellas, raise their voices to the sky.
Then Plowright, with one final effort, tears himself away
And leaves the field exhausted, but the victor of the fray.
Just then upon the startled air a fearsome sound arose
That caused the ladies to give voice to little startled " Ohs,"
Like noise of many thunders was the maddening awful ding,
Yet 'twas but the band attempting the " Relief of Mafeking."

And yet once more upon the turf, the youths attend to play,
But now they place fell obstacles right in the heroes' way.
And first of all a structure like a house their toil defied,
And oft they rush the steep incline, then down again they slide,
As often when at midnight the feline songsters fail
To climb a roof too steep, and slip with many a fearsome wail
Into a butt of water 'neath the gable's lower brim ;
But Davies, named Secundus, crossed ; ail honour be to him.
And next a board close to the ground barred all the heroes' way,
Yet underneath it they must pass to win the battle play.
Then just as down at High Street when there's eighty wish to ride
In one small car, and push and kick and will not be denied,
So they squeeze.

But Davies, light and active, from the board escapes him first,
(From kindness we withhold the fact of who got through it worst),
And next, a net of giddy height and eminence to view
Their passage bars ; but o'er they go like monkeys from the Zoo.
Last obstacle of all, a set of tubs their pathway blocks;
Through these the doughty men must pass, nor heed the dreadful shocks,
For the judge, unhallowed villain, sets the barrels all a-roll;
Was ever mortal so hard pressed to reach the longed-far goal ?
And one poor mortal down the field went rolling o'er and o'er,
And every roll removed him from his deeply wished for shore.
But Davies quickly 'scapes him from the treacherous tubs that roil,
And spurting 'cross the verdant turf, comes victor to the goal.

And now, the races all being o'er, around the shrine they stand,
(By this time they had managed to get rid of all the band.)
There all the gifts of wondrous 'art were tastefully set out,
Balls wrought in crimson leather, and bats of timber stout,
Twin cauldrons of electro-plate right pleasant for to see,
And silver bowls with picturing fret, that shone right merrily;
A shield, withal, of wondrous skill attracted their attention,
And other articles of worth too numerous to mention.
To give the prizes to the youths, in beauteous attire
Attends the Lady Mayoress, graceful Queen of Hallamshire.
Then when each youth had ta'en the prize he earned by bitter pain,
They warbled forth " God save the Queen " and all went home again.

S.R.G.S. v. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.

Played at Darnall. May 23rd. with a not encouraging result.

S.R.G.S.

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.

 

Rickett, b Davies

3

Bingham, not out

17

Dalton, b Daniel

0

Daniel, b Barton  

13

Davies II, b Davies

0

Davies, not out

1

Merryweather, ht wkt. b Davies

0

Knowles

Did not bat.

Mr. Humphreys, c Linfoot, b Davies

7

Baker

"

Barton, b Davies

3

Mantle

"

Mr. Lewis, lbw, b Daniel

0

Hickmott

"

Thomas (O.B.), not out

5

Coward

"

Russell, c Hickmott, b Daniel

1

Linfoot

"

Hooson, b Daniel

0

Wilkinson

"

Plowright, b Daniel

2

Harby

"

Extras

2

Extras

2

Total

23

Total (for 1 wkt)

33

BOWLING ANALYSIS.

Overs.

Maidens.

Runs.

Wickets.

Average.

Barton

3

0

17

1

17

Thomas

2

0

14

0

-

S.R.G.S. v. CHESTERFIELD G.S.

Played at Chesterfield, Saturday, May 26th, and resulted in a victory, by a narrow margin after an exciting game.

S.R.G.S.

 

CHESTERFIELD G.S.

 

Rickett, c Marsden, b Davies

3

H. P. Weber, b Froggatt

0

Barton, lbw, b Davies

0

Townrow, b Barton

0

Dalton, run out

9

H. C. Weber, c Froggatt, b Barton

0

Merryweather, b Davies

0

Woodger, b Barton

1

Davies II, c P. Weber, b C. Weber

11

Davies, c Froggatt, b Barton

12

Russell, b C. Weber

0

Marsden, c Barton, b Froggatt

1

Dodson I, c Holden, b C. Weber

0

Hanson, lbw, b Froggatt

3

Froggatt I, lbw, b Townrow

6

Pattison, b Barton

15

Davies I, c Kent, b C. Weber

7

Stanley, b Barton

3

Proctor, lbw, b Townrow

4

Holder, run out

1

Dunnill, not out , .

0

Kent, not out

1

Extras

3

Extras

4

Total

48

Total

41

BOWLING ANALYSIS.
 

Overs.

Maidens.

Runs.

Wickets.

Barton

11

2

21

6

Froggatt

10.2

4.2

16

3

S.R.G.S. v. ROTHERHAM G.S.

At Broomhall Park, June 9th. Won on the first innings. In our second essay Dalton played a good not out innings of 28.

S.R.G.S.

First Innings.

 

Second Innings.

 

Rickett, b Law  

0

c Goucher, b Law

7

Barton, run out , ,

6

b Handley

2

Dalton, Henderson

2

not out

28

Davies II, b Law

7

b Law

4

Froggatt, lbw, b Henderson

11

c Spencer, b Handley

6

Merryweather, b Henderson

2

c Henderson, b Law

6

Davies I, run out

1

b Law

4

Hooson, not out  

8

c Handley, b Empson

0

Russell, b Henderson

0

b Law

0

Dodson, b Law

2

b Law

10

Proctor, b Law , .

3

c Micklethwaite, b Beacher

0

Extras

8

Extras

, 8

Total. .

  50

Total  

75

ROTHERHAM G.S.

Ball, b Barton

13

Roddis, b Froggatt

1

Micklethwaite, b Barton

1

Law, run out

2

Spencer, b Froggatt

1

Henderson, c Russell, b Froggatt

0

Goucher, b Froggatt

0

Handley, c Russell, b Barton

1

Empson, b Froggatt

5

Thompson, c and b Barton

0

Beacher, not out

0

Extras

9

Total

33

BOWLING ANALYSIS.
 

Overs.

Maidens.

Runs,

Wickets.

Barton

7

2

13

4

Froggatt  

6.3

3.3

11

5

S.R.G.S. v. SHEFFIELD CLERGY.

The Clergy visited us with a strong team on June 13th, for the annual fixture. Our Captain winning the toss unfortunately elected to go in. Mr. Lewis played a good innings and was unlucky in being out to the last ball before lunch. Afterwards, with a drying and tricky wicket, the clergy field stood so close in, that the batsmen scarcely had room to breathe. Between the innings the teams were photographed by Davies III (see plate), and then the Clergy proceeded to give us a taste of their quality ; but we will not particularize-the subject is a painful one ; we think, however, that our fielding should not have got quite so slack.

S.R.G.S.

 

CLERGY.

 

Mr. Lewis, run out

20

Rev. P. E. Lord, st Cockayne, b Hodgetts

107

Mr. Merrikin, c Knight, b Julian

7

Rev. C. E. Knight, b Barton  

0

Mr. Humphreys, b Day  

1

Rev. E. V. Everard, b Nicholson

0

Barton, b Day

3

Rev. C. E. Julian, c Barton, b Humphreys

25

Mr. Nicholson, b Baines  

2

Rev. G. Osborne, b Humphreys

0

E. L. Thomas (O.B.), b Baines  

0

Rev. N. E. Day, run out

59

Mr. Overend, b Day

5

Rev. A. E. Baines

 

J. Cockayne (O.B.), c Julian, b Baines  

5

Rev. S. Scott, b Nicholson

0

Mr. Hodgetts, c Julian, b Day  

5

Rev. C. C. Ellis, b Barton

16

Dalton, not out

4

Rev. T. Houghton

 

Froggat, b Day

3

J. W. Merryweather, not out  

10

Extras

5

Extras

12

Total   

60

Total  

229

BOWLING ANALYSIS-CLERGY.
 

Overs.

Maidens.

Runs.

Wickets.

Barton

9.3

2.3

48

2

Mr. Nicholson  

11

0

52

2

Froggatt

4

0

17

0

Mr. Humphreys

4

0

21

2

Thomas

7

1

32

0

Mr. Merrikin , .

3

0

19

0

Mr. Hodgetts  

4

0

28

1

WE regret that two errors regarding facts appeared in our last , issue, for which neither our printers nor ourselves are to blame, the MSS. supplied being accurately followed.

In the report of the House Competitions the Hallam v. Park Chess should have been credited to Hallam, which won all three games. The final position of the houses should be Sharrow, Hallam, Park, Town.

In the "Conway" Letter the number of boys should have been given as " about two hundred."

Mr. S. J. Chapman has won the Adam Smith Prize at the University of Cambridge. This is awarded triennially for Economic research ; Mr. Chapman gained it by an Essay on "The Forms of Production and Distribution in the Cotton Industry." Mr. Chapman has been appointed Lecturer in Political Science at University College, Cardiff.

Our O.Bs. at Cambridge have been going strong in the College Examinations.
G. Norwood is 1st Prizeman in Classics at St. John's and has a Scholarship of £90.
0. Glauert is 1st Prizeman in Mathematics at Clare, and has the " Lady Clare " Scholarship of £70.
J. A. Pate is 1st Prizeman in Classics at Corpus Christi, and has gained a Foundation Scholarship of £40 ; also a Silver Cup for Latin Declamation.

B. Lister has passed Responsions at the University of Oxford.

J. H. Preston (O.B.) has gained the Corporation Scholarship of £25 a year for three years at the University College.

Barnes has been awarded a Free Studentship at the Sheffield Technical School.

To all the above we offer our sincere congratulations.

The two pictures of the teams in the cricket match, School v. Shef­field Clergy, are from photographs taken by Davies III. It affords us much pleasure to be able to reproduce some of the work of one of the boys of the School.

Old Boys' Editors :
J. STOKES, M.D.; W. G. WALKER.

School Editors :
J. H. HODGETTS, M.A., B.Sc.; W. A. CLEMENTSON; J. A. CROWTHER.

 

PAGE.

PLATES-The School

to face 49

Group, Shakespeare's Henry VI

57

School Group, June, 1899

81

Sheffield Cantabs, 1897

113

S.R.G.S. v. Sheffield Clergy

129

Aeneid XIII  

125

Amalgamated Clubs

47, 89, 127

Athletic Sports

2 130

At School, 1892-9

69

Bat, The  

86

Cambridge Letter .  

22, 71, 103, 136

Characters, Football

110

Chess Club

74

Comparison, A

122

Compensations

37

" Conway " Letter .

117

Concert

12

Correspondence  

27, 100

Corrigenda

144

Cricket

27, 40, 127, 141

Cricket, Anticipations of

15

Cricket Season, 1899

44

Editorial  

1, 17, 62, 129

Edwinstowe, Round

9

Examinations, S. Kensington

35

Fives Tournament  

125

Football  

13, 75, 91, 106, 108

Football Characters

14

Grammariad, The  

139

Hare and Hounds  

75

House Chess  

75, 89

Houses, The

121

In Memoriam

8, 31, 80

Leonids, The Lost  

89

Literary and Scientific Society

63, 84, 98, 114

Magic Lantern among the Gonds, A

134

Melody, Ode to

26

Musical and Dramatic Society

64, 85, 111

Old Boys' Association

 18, 65, 113

Old Boys' Dinner  

.81

Oxford Letter .

24, 73, 101, 138

Playing Fields

113

Question of Pronunciation, A

105

Rats and Mice

119

Red Cross Knights

,.19

School, The

, 33

School Staff, The

50

School Lists

51

Speech Day

54

Scripture Union

  9, 19, 34, 66,97

School News .

16, 31, 47, 96, 112, 128, 144

Scholarships, Foundation ,

36

VERSE-A Question of Pronunciation

105

Aeneid XIII  

125

Grammariad

140

Ode to Melody    

26

Visit, A Flying

5

Writing, Its Mystery and History

116