GOVERNORS.

Ex-officio.

VEN. ARCHDEACON EYRE.

Co-Optative.

WALTER BROWN, Esq.        THE LORD MAYOR (S. Roberts, Esq., J.P.)
SIR HENRY STEPHENSON, J.P.     
C. MACRO WILSON, Esq.    A. WIGHTMAN, Esq.
S. G. RICHARDSON, Esq., J.P.

Representative.

Town Trustees-J. H. BARBER, Esq., J. P. ; ALD. W. SMITH.
City Council-H. P. MARSH, Esq., J.P. ; G. F. Lockwood, Esq. ; W. TURNER, Esq.
School Board-REV. FOLIOTT G. SANDFORD.

Council of Firth College-PROF. HICKS, M.A., F.R.S., D.Sc. ; H. O. SORBY, Esq., LL.D., F.R.S.

For the Purpose of the Technical Instruction Act-ALDERMAN W. E. CLEGG and COUNCILLOR H. W. CHAMBERS.

Clerk to the Governors. J. J. WHEAT, Esq,

SCHOOL STAFF.

Head Master.
REV. A. B. HASLAM, M.A. (1st Class Honours, Classics), Camb. ; late Foundation Scholar of S. John's Coll., Camb.

Second Master.
J. H. HODGETTS, M.A. (2nd Class Honours, Math.), Camb. ; late Foundation Scholar of Queens' Coll., Camb. ; B.Sc., Lond. Univ.

F. A. BULAU, Ph.D., M.A., Univ. of Gottingen ; late Examiner to the Univ. of New Zealand.

B. CAUDWELL, B.A. (Honours, English), Inter. Sc., Lond. Univ.

G. W. HUMPHREYS, B.A., late Foundation Scholar of Queens' Coll., Camb.

G. H. MERRIKIN, B.A., St. Catherine's Coll., Oxford.

F. L. OVEREND, B.A. (Honours, Nat. Sci.), Oxford ; F,C.S., late Open Exhibitioner of Jesus College, Oxford.

A. WATSON, B.A., St. John's Coll., Cambridge. Preparatory School. J. KING, Lond. Univ.

S. NICHOLSON, St. Peter's Coll., Cambridge.

DRILL SERGT.-W. J. BELL, Sergeant Instructor, 1st Connaught Rangers.

VISITING .MASTERS--S. WHITELEY (Shorthand, Book-keeping, and Type-writing). A. W. THOMAS, Principal of Sloyd School.

Honorary Physician and Surgeon. J. W. MARTIN, M.D.

Examiners.

R. W. SHACKLE, M.A., St. Catharine's ColL, Cambridge. J. H. FLATHER, M.A., Emmanuel Coll., Cambridge.
E. S. SHUCKBURGH, M.A., late Fellow of Emmanuel ColL, Camb.

*Indicates absence from Examination.

t           „           „           part of ,,

Names of new boys occur in the central column.

 

FORM VI.

   

Term.

 

Examination.

 

Norwood

 

Norwood

 

Glauert

 

Glauert

 

Dodson

 

Allison

 

Pate

 

Dodson I

 

Allison

 

Andrew

 

Andrew

 

Crowther

 

Crowther

 

Clementson

 

Clementson

 

Pate

 

Cornu

 

Coore

 

Coore

 

Cornu

 

Lister

 

Lister

 
 

FORM V.

   

Term.

 

Examination.

 

Middleton

 

Bagshawe

 

Plowright

 

Middleton

 

Kirk

 

Kirk

 

Turnbull II

 

Plowright

 

Bagshawe

 

Coombe

 

Stevenson

 

Turnbull II

 

Coombe

 

Dodson II

 

Lean

 

Stevenson

 

Dodson II

 

Barton

 

Brown

 

Lean

 

Barton

 

*Brown

 

Machon

 

*Machon

 

*Turnbull I

 

*Turnbull I

 
 

FORM IV.

   

Monypenny

 

Monypenny

 

Mather II

 

Mather II

 

Dean

 

Dean

 

Cockayne II

 

Furnival

 

Furnival

 

Dalton

 

Dalton

 

Merryweather

 

Turner

 

Davies I

 

Merryweather

 

Turner

 

Thompson

 

Cockayne 11

 

Davies I

 

Thompson

 

Green

 

*Clark

 

Renshaw

 

*`Cockayne I

 

Williams

 

*Green

 

Cockayne I

 

*Lee

 

Clark'

 

*Renshawe

 

Lee

 

"Williams

 
 

Iliffe I,

   
 

REMOVE FORM.

   

Term.

 

Examination.

 

Moore

 

Moore

 

Froggatt II

 

May

 

Forster

 

Edeson

 

Marsh

 

Dunnill

 

Edeson

 

Moorwood I

 

Dunnill

 

Froggatt II

 

Barnes

 

Forster

 

Holburn

 

Barnes

 

May

 

Schnetzler

 

Moorwood

 

Proctor

 

Proctor

 

Whiteley

 

Schnetzler

 

Marsh

 

Whiteley

 

Holburn

 

Binney

 

Binney

 
 

Iliffe II

   
 

COMMERCIAL

FORM.

 

Lloyd

 

Lloyd

 

blather I

 

Mather I

 

Denton

 

Denton

 

Derecourt t Equal

Derecourt

 

Froggatt I l

 

Froggatt I

 
 

THIRD FORM.

   

UPPER DIVISION.

     

Unwin

 

Lipson

 

Lipson

 

Pearson

 

Pearson

 

Truelove

 

Truelove

 

Dodson III

 

Turnbull III

 

Unwin

 

Dodson III

 

Turnbull III

 

Davies II

 

Carr

 

Carr '

 

Davies II

 

Townsend

 

Maples

 

Maples

 

McManus

 

McManus

 

Townsend

 

LOWER DIVISION.

     

Belcher

 

Rayner

 

Parkin

 

Evans

 

Gilmour

 

Parkin

 

Hooson

 

Belcher

 

Evans

 

Hooson

 

Rayner

 

Gilmour

 

Thrutchley

 

Thrutchley

 
 

New Boys.

   
 

Andrew II

   
 

Bramley

   
 

Chappell

   
 

Johnson II

   
 

Ibbotson

   
 

Hills

   
 

Howell

   
 

Skinner

   
 

Widlake

   
 

Wright

   

Term.

FORM II.

Examination.

UPPER DIVISION,

 

UPPER DIVISION.

Goddard

 

Goddard

Downing

 

Downing

Davies IV

 

Lowe

Lowe

 

Davies IV

Shanks

 

Shanks

Fowler

 

Fowler

Davies III

 

Davies III

Gyte

 

Gyte

Baker

 

Earle

Earle

 

Blandy

Blandy

 

*Baker

LOWER DIVISION.

 

LOWER DIVISION.

Charlesworth

 

Charlesworth

Gould

 

Hawson

Hawson

 

Hallam

Russell

 

Mettham

Hartley

 

Gould

Hallam

 

Hartley

Doyle

 

Doyle

Dalton

Mappin

   

Mettham

 

Russell

Nowill

New Boys.

Nowill

Dalton

Beard I

Wigfull

Flockton

Muxlow

Flockton

Wigfull

Hargreaves

Mappin

UPPER DIVISION.

FORM 1.

UPPER DIVISION,

Jump

 

Jump

Twigg

 

Simpson

Simpson

 

Twigg

Johnson

 

Mawhood 1

Barnes II

 

Johnson

Mawhood I

 

Burton

Howarth

 

Barnes II

Burton

 

Mathews I

Mower

 

Slagg

Mathews I

 

Welby

Welby

 

Mower

Slagg

 

*Howarth

Lister III (absent term)

*Lister III

LOWER DIVISION.

 

LOWER DIvisION.

Whale

 

Taylor

Abell

 

Abell

Rickett

 

Trickett I

Ward

 

Whale

Gray I

New Boys,

Ward

Carlisle

Appleby

Gray I

Trickett I

Beard II

Rickett

Taylor

Chambers

Carlisle

Gray II

Howison

Smith II

Smith II

Iliffe III

*Gray II

 

Mercer

 
 

Richmond

 
 

Trickett II

 

PREPARATORY SCHOOL.

FORM ORDER, MIDSUMMER, 1899,

 

Division I.

 

Creake

 

Mathews II

Hancock

 

Black I

Cockayne III

 

Moorwood II

Mathews III

 

Huxley

Wilkins

 

Smith II

Mawhood II

 

Moorwood III

Black II

 

King

Hill

 

Hutchinson

Mallaband

 

Tether I

Goodall

 

Tether II

Hartle

   
 

New Boys.

 
 

Carrington

 
 

Deakin

 
 

Eardley

 
 

Harland

 
 

Kirk II

 
 

Taylor II

 
 

Division 11,

 

Dust

 

Haynes

Liversidge

 

Gyte II

Dodson IV

 

Lowe II

Cockayne IV

 

Greaves

Wood

 

Edwards

Cox

 

Dewsnap

Birch

 

Wain I

Nowill II

 

Copley

 

New Bays.

 
 

Forsdike

 
 

Gibson

 
 

utchinson

 
 

Stirgess

 
 

Wain II

 

 

THE annual Speech Day was fixed for October 18th, when, by the kindness of the Council of University College, the Hall of the College was placed at our disposal, our own big school having but too often proved inadequate to the requirements of the occasion. A very large and influential gathering was the result. The Ven. Archdeacon
Eyre presided, and amongst others who accepted the invitation of the Head Master and Mrs. Haslam were the Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress, Sir Henry and Lady Stephenson, Ald. Franklin and Miss Franklin, Dr. Hicks, Mr. H. P. Marsh and Mrs. Marsh, Mr. H. W. Chambers and Mrs, Chambers, Mr. W. Turner and Mrs. Turner, Mr. A. Wightman, Mrs. Wightman, and the Misses Wightman, Mr. S. G. Richardson and Miss Richardson, Mr. and Mrs. Newton Coombe, AId. and Mrs. W. H. Brittain, Mr. and Mrs. Derry, Dr. and Mrs. Martin, Dr. and Miss Dyson, Dr. and Mrs. Porter, Mr. and Mrs. T. P. Lock­wood, Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Hicks, Rev. J. G. Williams, Rev. A. and Mrs. Mitchell, Rev, C. and Mrs, Clementson, Rev. T. and Mrs. Houghton, Rev. J. W. and Miss Merryweather, Rev. J. Gilmore, Mr. and Mrs. Esam, Mr. and Mrs. Archer, the Misses Favell, Mr. and Mrs. Robertshaw, Mr. and Mrs. Hawksley, Mr. T. Willoughby Firth, Mr. and Mrs. Suckley, Mr. and Mrs. Whiteley, Dr, and Airs. Robert­son and Miss Thomas, Prof. and Mrs. Appleton, Prof. and Miss Anderson, Prof. Leahy, Prof. Moore Smith and Mrs. Moore Smith, Mrs. Henry, Miss Escott, Mr. and Mrs, Morgan, &c.

Letters of apology were received from the Duke of Norfolk, the Master Cutler, Sir Frederick and Lady Mappin, the City Members of Parliament, Principal Bodington, Ald. and Mrs. Wm. Smith, Rev. Foliott Sandford and Mrs. Sandford, Mr. A. Warner, Mr. and Mrs. Macro Wilson, Sir Wm. Long, the Rev. A. Pearson and Mrs. Pearson, and others.

We may with pardonable pride claim that the function was most successful, although we had not the pleasure of the presence of the Marquess of Ripon, K.G,, who had promised to distribute the prizes. The re-assembling of Parliament the night before making it impossible for the noble Marquess to fulfil his promise, which it was hoped to the very last he might be able to do, the Lord Mayor of Sheffield very kindly undertook to fill his place.

The Ven. Archdeacon Eyre, as Chairman of the Board of Gover­nors, opened the proceedings. He said his first word must be one of regret. The Marquess of Ripon had kindly consented to distribute the prizes that evening, but unfortunately his responsible position in Parliament necessitated his presence there, and he had expressed his regret at his unavoidable absence. It was a matter of the deepest regret to all of them to know that the late Head Master of the School was still suffering from the sad malady which caused his retirement from the Head Mastership. They would never forget that he gave the best years of his life to the work of the School, and they would never cease to cherish the recollection of his Head Mastership with

feelings of thankfulness and hearty appreciation. (Applause.) He congratulated the now Master, Mr. Haslam, and all friends of the School on the fact that the entry of boys this term had actually beaten the record. That was practical evidence of what Sheffield felt with regard to Mr. Haslam's Head Mastership. (Applause.) He might add that the Archbishop of Canterbury, when be visited Sheffield in February last, had promised Mr. Haslam, who was an old and favourite pupil of his, that although he could not come to the School Speech Day this year, he hoped to do so on another occasion.

Then followed two vocal contributions by the Choir :-Part Song, " Swedish Peasant March " (A. Soderman) ; and Glee, " Three Doughtie Menne" (W. Pearson). Both were very pleasingly rendered, and reflected the greatest credit upon Mr. Watson.

The Head Master then read extracts from the reports of the Examiners appointed by the Cambridge Syndicate to examine the School in July.

Passing from the reports, of which we subjoin an abstract, Mr. Haslam dealt with the position of the School. Referring to the past, he followed the Archdeacon in words of sad regret for the loss sustained by the School in Mr. Senior's illness and consequent resignation. He spoke of the great kindness be had always met with from him since his first arrival in Sheffield nearly nine years ago, and paid an eloquent tribute to the work he had done in connection with the School, the Head Masters' Association, the Old Boys' Association, and other spheres of scholastic effort. Turning to the present and the future, he explained the reconstruction of the School which he had carried out, whereby part of the Upper School is conducted as an Organised School of Science, adapted for either the scientific or commercial training of boys. On the Commercial Side sound English, with French and German, and possibly Spanish, would form the bulk of the work ; a foundation for a knowledge of shorthand and bookkeeping being laid at the same time, though he strongly deprecated the idea that these, which would be better attained subse­quently, should be thrown into undue prominence in School.

To meet what was an urgent need he had commenced a Junior Class, for very little boys, in his own house. This was under the charge of an experienced lady teacher. It was not a Kindergarten class, but in it boys were trained in intelligent habits of work to fit them for the school proper.

 

As for the future, he saw no reason why the school should not become as extensive an institution as the similar foundations of Bradford, Birmingham, and Manchester. At any rate, its work would vie with that of those schools ; and its expansion rested with the citizens of Sheffield to whose public spirit he appealed..

In conclusion, the Headmaster thanked the Council, Principal Hicks, and, in fact, all connected with University College for their kindness, by which practically the whole College was at our disposal for that evening.

The audience was then invited to witness the representation of a scene from Shakespeare, Henry VI., Pt. II., Act IV., Scene 11., the characters being represented by the following, boys of the school, past and present:­

Jack Cade ..

H. K. Marples (O.B.).

George Bevis

J. H. Machon (O.B.).

John Holland

A. Clementson.

Dick, the Butches-

A. Allison.

Smith, the Weaver

B. Lister.

Clerk of Chatham

W. Andrew.

Sir Humphrey Stafford

L. Coombe.

Lord Say , -

K. Kirk.

Messenger

C. Plowright.

Michael

C. Plowright.

The scene was rendered with much spirit and met with hearty applause.

play

The Lord Mayor then proceeded to distribute the prizes, the list of winners of which is subjoined. His lordship said he felt that that part of the duty he could discharge as well as the noble Marquess, but when it came to delivering the address on education, which Lord Ripon was to have delivered, he felt himself in a somewhat a° tight" place, He spoke in terms of sympathetic regret of the retirement of the late Headmaster. Referring to Mr. Haslam's appointment, he declared emphatically that it was the best, and, in fact, the only possible one. The quality of the work done by Mr. Haslam and the staff of Assistant Masters was evidenced by the reports of the Examiners, and by the list of distinctions gained in public examina­tions. He said that the report was the best obtained during the years that he had been on the governing body, and he heartily congratulated all concerned upon those successes. Though he was unable to give them a formal address on that intricate subject " Education," there were one or two points in connection with their school to which he desired to refer. In the first place, the Headmaster had spoken of the school as belonging to the city. That was emphatically the case. It was under the control of a governing body of public men, all representative citizens. It was largely subsidised by the City Council. It was not carried on for profit making, and it was the only represen­tative Secondary School in the city, forming a connecting link between the Primary Schools on the one hand and the Universities on the other. He wished to remind parents that they had in their midst a school which met all the requirements of either classical or modern education, with well equipped buildings, a thoroughly competent Headmaster and Staff, and school fees within the reach of those of moderate income. He called upon them as loyal citizens to do their utmost to build up the school and make it equal to those in other parts of the country. There was one point in which he hoped to have the school better furnished, and that was in the matter of playing fields. The school funds were not adequate, but still he trusted that the want would be remedied at the earliest opportunity, believing as he did in good physical training being associated with the mental. Another point he wished to refer to was the Foundation Scholarships. Half of those scholarships were reserved for children attending the Voluntary and Board Schools of the city. He hoped and wished that these Founda­tion Scholarships would be very much extended, because there was a large number of children of great natural ability, capable of profiting by the advantages of the education offered by the school, but who were heavily handicapped by reason of the narrow means of their parents.

His Lordship's speech, which had been received with frequent applause, concluded with words of congratulation to the prize winners, and of encouragement to the less successful.

Mr. H. W. Chambers proposed, and Mr. Arthur Wightman seconded, a hearty vote of thanks to the Lord Mayor, who briefly acknowledged the same. A cordial vote of thanks to the Ven. Archdeacon for presiding, and to the other members of the governing body followed, proposed by the Headmaster, seconded by Mr. Wm. Turner.

The singing of the School Song (written by the Headmaster), and the National Anthem, brought the proceedings to a termination.

The following is the list of distinctions and prize winners:­

PRIZES AND CERTIFICATES.

FORM PRIZES,

Languages and Literature.

VI.: Upper, Norwood ; Lower, Andrew. V.: Upper, Middleton ;

Lower, Plowright. IV.: Monypenny. REMOVE : Moore. III.:

Unwin. IT,: Goddard. I.: Davies iii, Jump. Prep. I

Whale, Welby, Creake. Prep. II.: Matthews ii, Dust.

Mathematics.

DiV. I.: Allison, Crowther.        II.: Dean.          III.: Mather ii. IV.:

Pearson. V.: Goddard. VI.: Downing.

Science.

Section I., Glauert, Crowther, Bagshawe. II.: Monypenny, Moore.

EXAMINATION PRIZES.

VI.: Crowther (English), Norwood (Classics), Glauert (Mathematics).

V.: Bagshawe (General), Kirk (English), Plowright (Classics), Coombe

(French and German), Turnbull ii. (Mathematics).

IV.: Monypenny (General), Mather ii. (General).

REMOVE : Moore (Mathematics and Modern Languages), May (English),

Edeson (Classics).

III.: Lipson (General), Truelove (English), Davies ii. (Mathematics).

II.: Goddard (General), Hawson (Latin and French), Downing

(General).

L : Jump (General), Twigg (English), Simpson (General), Taylor

(English and Latin).

PREP. I.: Matthews iii (General), Creake (Latin and Arithmetic), Han­

cock (French).

Prep. II.: Dust (General), Liversidge (General).

CERTIFICATES.

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY LOCAL EXAMINATIONS,

SENIORS.

Honours-Class II.: A. Allison, passed in 8 subjects.

Passed--Clementson, passed in 4 subjects ; Coore, passed in 5 subjects ; James, passed in 4 subjects ; Lister, passed in 3 subjects.

. JUNIORS.

 

Honours.-Class I., Div. I.: Crowther, distinguished in Religious Knowledge, English, Mathematics, & Chemistry;

 
   

passed in 6 subjects.

 

Class I., Div. I.: Turnbull i, passed in 7 subjects, distinguished in Mathematics,

 

Class I., Div. II.: Andrew, passed in 6 subjects.

 

Class I., Div. II.: Bagshawe, passed in 6 subjects, distinguished in Chemistry.

 

Class II..--Middleton, passed in 6 subjects.

 

Class III.-Machon, passed in 6 subjects.

 

Class III.---Plowright, passed in 5 subjects.

 

Passed-Coombe, passed in 4 subjects ; Dodson ii., passed in 2 subjects; Green, passed in 3 subjects; Turnbull ii., passed in 3 subjects, distinguished in Mathematics ; Swinscoe, passed in 2 subjects ; Stevenson, passed in 3 subjects.

 

SOUTH KENSINGTON SCIENCE EXAMINATIONS.

 

Practical Chemistry, Advanced Stage.

 

First Class : Glauert.

 

Second Class : Crowther, Allison, Clementson.

 

Elementary Stage.

 

First Class: Bagshawe, Turnbull ii, Middleton, Kirk, Stevenson.

 

Second Class : Moore, Coombe, Green, Turner, Cockayne.

 

Theoretical Chemistry, Advanced.

 

First Class : Crowther, Allison, Bagshawe.

 

Second Class : Glauert, Barnes.

 

Elementary.

 

First Class : Kirk, Middleton, Coombe, Monypenny, Trotter.

 

Second Class : Dodson ii., Lean, Dean, Green, Stevenson.

 

Sound, Light, and Heat-Elementary.

 

First Class : Allison, Bagshawe, Crowther, Glauert.

 

Theoretical Mechanics, Fluids-Elementary.

 

First Class : Kirk, Crowther, Bagshawe.

 

Second Class : Machon, Allison, Turnbull ii, Clementson.

 

Theoretical Mechanics, Solids-Elementary.

 

First Class : Crowther.

 

Mathematics.

 

STAGE II.-First Class : Crowther, Allison,

 

Second Class : Clementson, Kirk, Andrew.

 

STAGE I,-First Class : Coombe, Middleton, Monypenny.

 

Second Class : Dodson ii, Plowright, Dalton, Green, Dean,

 

Mather, Moore.

 

ROYAL DRAWING SOCIETY'S YEARLY EXAMINATION. - Nineteen boys obtained honours ; 64 boys passed.

 

[We subjoin a short abstract of the Reports of the Examiners : those documents being much too long for verbatim reproduction.]

After speaking in terms of praise of the Preparatory School, in the course of which he says" I have much pleasure in congratulating their Master on the success of his work," the Examiner proceeds to speak in detail of the different subjects taken in the Upper Schools. The general knowledge of Scripture was good, with several excellent papers ; rather more acquaintance with detail was in some cases desirable. The History throughout gained high commendation, especially the advanced Roman History of the VI. Form ; while in Geography the only thing that seemed to call for comment was the fact that the Commercials did equally good papers with the Remove Form, whereas, for some reason, the Examiner expected something more from the former. The English Grammar and Literature met with generally favourable comment.

The Latin, in the examination of which three Examiners partici­pated, was the subject of considerable eulogy, the work of Norwood and Dodson in the VT, and Monypenny in IV, being marked out for especial commendation. The boys of VT showed good and accurate knowledge in answer to questions on Cicero pro Cluentio and Lucretius V; while with the unprepared translation of IV, Mr. Flather says he was '4 much pleased." Of Forms III, II, I, (each in two Divisions,) and Prep. I, Mr. Shackle says-"All the Divisions, down to the lowest, did excellent work in their several degrees, such as can only have been the outcome of the most painstaking teaching."

The report of the Greek, though referring to a relatively small number of boys, was of more than the "satisfactory" order, while Norwood again came in for individual commendation,

The French was good, though attention to several specific points in certain Forms was suggested as desirable. In German, both Grammar and Exercises of Divisions III and IV were described as u excellent," as also were those of I and II, except in the matter, of the boys having attempted too much..

The various branches of Mathematics were individually and favourably commented upon ; the schoolboy's usual tendency to "long windedness" in the matter of decimal working being referred to. In particular it is noted that one boy in Form VI gained full, and three others very high, marks in Arithmetic ; the latter remark also applying to three boys of Form IV.

The Report concludes as follows:-" This brings me to the conclusion of my Report, which will read, if I have succeeded in rightly expressing myself, as a record of much earnest and successful work. This success is the more creditable to the School because it has laboured under the serious disadvantage, first of the. prolonged illness and absence of the Head Master, and then of a change of Head Masters in the middle of the school year. It only remains for me to congratulate the present Head Master and his Staff upon the prospect of less trying times in the coming year, and to thank them for the kind help they have afforded me in testing what they have already accomplished."

 

OUR readers, to whom we tender all good wishes at this season, will observe indications of our " turning over a new leaf " before the advent of the New Year, the time generally reserved for that exercise. The present double illustrated number is an earnest of our intention to expand. It is felt that the School as a representative institution ought to be thoroughly well known and supported by all loyal citizens of Sheffield, and the Magazine is one means to achieve this result. It is intended then to extend the circulation and to improve the Magazine at the same time, the additional expense in­ curred in the latter process being defrayed by the increase in the former. In presenting two zincograph plates, one of the school buildings, the other of the Shakespearean group at the Speech Day performance, we are taking advantage of the most recent applications of photography to printing. If our experiment is successful, and the support we meet with such as we hope, our pages will from time to time be adorned in a similar way. We beg our subscribers to note that we have decided that in future our new volume shall begin with the school year; the current volume thus including the May and duly issues will consist of eight numbers (by post 4/6). Each future volume will comprise six numbers (by post 3/6).

THIS Society has once more resumed its functions, and is now in V full working order. At a meeting held on October 4th, the officers of the Society were elected; and then Clementson read a paper on the " Life and Customs of the Ancient Egyptians." The paper, which will be described elsewhere, was illustrated by many diagrams and illustrations, and afforded a very enjoyable evening. On October 0th there was a debate on the action of the Government with regard to the Transvaal, and, as is natural with such a subject, pre­judice rather than argument prevailed.

At a meeting held on Oct. 25th, with Mr. Hodgetts in the chair, a debate was held on "The Employment of Women in Business." Allison, seconded by Andrew, moved approval, and was opposed by Clementson and Kirk, An interesting debate followed; and finally the opposition proved the stronger party. Impromptu speech-making followed and afforded much amusement. At the con­clusion, Mr. Hodgetts, in reply to a vote of thanks, expressed the hope that the Society would prosper, and advised the younger members especially to speak at debates.

A meeting was held on Nov. 15th, Mr. Lewis occupying the chair. Before the debate of the evening, Mr. Hodgetts gave a very interesting account of the meteor shower, the Leonids, due to appear that night. Commencing with their probable earlier journeyings in space, he proceeded to explain how they would have passed through our system and away again had not Uranus, close to which they passed in the year 126, swung them out of their orbit into their present elliptical path which they now traverse every 33 years. The speaker referred to Schiaparelli's discovery of a comet moving upon the same orbit, though the physical connection between comet and meteors is not yet known, and added details regarding Biela's seven year period comet whose path coincides with that of the Andromedids (the meteors of Nov. 27th), On the motion of Allison, seconded by Kirk, the thanks of the Society were conveyed to Mr. Hodgetts for his interesting discourse. A debate on "Conscription" then followed. Clementson moved the affirmative, in favour of conscription, and was seconded by Kirk. Allison, seconded by Turnbull, opposed, and was also supported by Machon and Dunnill. The voting also was in favour of the opposition, and at length the meeting concluded with a vote of thanks to Mr. Lewis for taking the chair.

THE first Concert of this Society was held on Oct. 14th. The proceedings commenced with a pianoforte solo, entitled °° Polaische Tanse " (Scharwenka) by Monypenny. This was followed by a recitation by Machon. A song by Froggatt was to have followed this, but had to be omitted as the singer could not come. The next item was a recitation entitled " Etiquette," by Kirk I. The remaining items of the first part were a 'cello solo, " Maritana," by Turnbull, and a series of Impersonations," by Machon, for which he was encored. The second part commenced with a violin and piano duet, entitled " Sarabande " (Corelli) by Mrs. and Miss Haslam. This was followed by a " Mixup" (voice and piano) by Machon who was recalled. A pianoforte solo, -0° Bluette Polka," (Bachman) by Monypenny was the next item. After this a 'cello solo, " Nocturne No. 5," (Bang Muller) by Turnbull ; and the entertainment concluded with a ventriloquial entertainment by Kirk. Mr. A. Watson acted as accompanist.

The second Concert came off on Nov. 4th. This entertainment was opened with a pianoforte solo, " Norwegian Bridal Procession," (-E. Grieg) by Monypenny. A recitation, "Phrenology," by Kirk followed, and after that a violin solo, "Lieder Ohne Worte, No. 1," (Hauser) by Turnbull II. A song, " Captain Dando," by Mr. Hum­phreys, came next, and was Allowed by a sketch, " The Village Concert," by J. II. Machon (O.B.). A violin and piano duet, "Shepherds' Dance," (E. German) by Mrs. and Miss Haslam, was the next item. The first part concluded with a song, f ° Young Kercheard," by Mr. Merrikin, and a 'cello solo, "Lieder Ohne Worte, No. 4 (Hauser), by Turnbull I.

The second part consisted of a Comedietta, entitled " Furnished Apartments," of which the following is the cast:­

Dr. Planes (a Surgeon-Apothecary desirous of improving his income by taking a single gentleman to board and lodge)    W. A B. Clementson.

Mr. Romeo Theodore Fuggles (Assistant to Dr. Planus and partial to the study of Music and Mnemonics) J. H. Machon (O.B.)

Mr. Magnus Smith (a gentleman having a great idea of his own importance and a small portmanteau, just arrived in town on a business of vast consequence)            A. Allison.

Mr. Telemachus Thompson (with weak nerves and a carpet bag, from the provinces; of retired habits and delighting in mystery)           K. E. Kirk.

Cephalus Squill (a well-educated youth, with respectable connections and carroty hair, officiating as Page, Groom, and Errand Boy in Dr. Planus' establishment)           Blandy.

The parts were generally well sustained. Machon unfortunately appeared to be suffering from a cold, as he was almost inaudible at times to the further half of the audience.

THE Annual General Meeting of the Old Boys' Association was held on Monday, Oct. 23rd, 1899, at the School, the Head Master presiding.

The Report and Balance Sheet for the past Session were read and confirmed. The meeting then proceeded to elect the officers for the ensuing Session, Mr. Gillott intimated his intention of retiring from the onerous position of Secretary to the Association, but he was unanimously invited to reconsider his decision. A way out of the difficulty was found by Messrs. Glauert and Tolputt agreeing to act as Assistant Secretaries with Mr. Gillott.

The President and Vice-Presidents (with the addition of the Rev, A. B. Haslam, M.A.; Dr. Sorby, F.R.S.; W. E. Clegg, Esq., and R. A. Hadfield, Esq.) were re-elected,

Dr. Stokes was re-elected Old Boys' Editor to the School magazine, with Mr. W. G. Walker as Assistant.

Mr. E. W. L. Thomas was appointed Auditor.

The following form the Committee ;-Messrs. Hodgetts (ex-officio), Merrikin, Overend, J. C. Auty, G. M. Cornu, S. Hawson, P. Maleham, ER. K. Marples, W. N. May, H. W. Middleton, J. M. Moulson, A. J. S_ Swifte, E. W. L. Thomas, W. P. Turnell, and F. G. Webster.

A statement was then made by the Chairman with regard to the small amount of ground available for games. He suggested that the Old Boys should form a club and join in the cost of the purchase of a new field. It was decided to call a special meeting of the Association to consider the matter. The meeting terminated with a vote of thanks to the Head Master for presiding.

The Special Meeting was held on Nov. 13th. The Headmaster, who presided, explained that the meeting had been convened in view of the absolute necessity of the School acquiring more space for playing fields. He urged the Old Boys to help the School and themselves by joining in the endeavour to purchase or lease a suitable ground.

Referring to a suggestion first thrown out at the General Meeting, Mr. Marples strongly deprecated the idea of using the sum of money originally raised as a Scholarship or Prize Fund. Messrs. Binney, Staniforth, Harrison, and Robinson supported Mr. Marples in his view of the case, while Dr. Stokes was in favour of the conversion if possible. All the speakers expressed their sympathy with the endeavour to enlarge our boundaries and gave promise of active support. From the speeches it was evident that the fund in question was distinct from the Association which has no control over it.

The Headmaster thanked the speakers for their promise of sup­port, and also for the information which was new to him regarding the Prize Fund, which he said it was clearly neither possible nor desirable to use for the purpose suggested.

An O.B. Committee, consisting of Dr. Stokes, Mr. C. Robinson, and Mr. A. E. Gillott, was appointed to co-operate with the School authorities with regard t securing a ground.

S.R.G.S. BRANCH.

THE first meeting this term was held on Sunday, Oct. 8th, when  Mr. Haslam gave a short Address.

At the next meeting, held on Oct. 29th, Mr. Hodgetts gave an Address on the formation and strengthening of good traits of character.

He spoke at some length and very clearly, dealing especially with the subject of truthfulness. God required truthfulness in thought, word, and deed. There must be no mental reservation ; a lie is not either "white" or "black," but "black" only. Anything that either falls short of, or exceeds, the absolute truth is sin. The speaker went on to speak of "cribbing" as a form of untruthfulness by action that boys must particularly guard against, and urged all to take up a Christian and manly position regarding all dishonesty.

Owing possibly to the inclemency of the weather on these two occasions, the attendance has averaged only 11. We should be glad to see larger meetings. Any information concerning the Union can be obtained from Kirk, the Hon. Secretary.

During the Mission Week in Sheffield, several services were held at the School, as well as addresses after Prayers each morning.

On Sunday, Nov. 12th, at the usual Bible Class, the Rev. Norman Bennett, Missioner to Public-School Boys, gave a short Address. He pointed out the necessity of living a true life at school, and thus leading other boys to follow one's example.

After Prayers on the morning of the 13th, the Rev. J. Stephens, Missioner at the Parish Church, gave an Address. He showed that we must, at once, decide whether we wished to lead a good or a bad life, and gave us some examples of the effect which a good and a bad life had at school.

. On Tuesday morning Mr. Stephens told us of the great struggle which was going on between God and the Devil to obtain possession of human souls, and showed us how easy it was to gratify sin, but yet how glorious to defy it.

On Wednesday Mr. Stephens gave us an example of a conversion of a factory hand, and the number of men this same convert procured for the Church.

On Thursday, the 16th, Mr. Norman Bennett addressed the boys on the subject of Repentance, taking for his text the parable of the Two Sons (Matt. xxi., 28). In the evening Mr. Bennett gave his lecture on "Palestine," illustrated by some excellent lantern slides. To illustrate the costumes he got a dozen or so of the boys to dress up, and appeared himself in the dress of an Arab Sheikh. The lecture was greatly appreciated.

On Friday morning also Mr. Bennett spoke. He held services at the School on the afternoons of Thursday and Friday (after school), and also on Saturday at 10 a.m., at each of which he gave a short Address. Mr. Bennett left Sheffield for Rossall on Saturday afternoon.

On Monday, Nov. 20th, Mr. Stephens gave a short Address on the subject of Jonah's flight from God. Among other lessons which this story teaches us, he said, was this : Just as the sailors had to cast Jonah overboard, to ensure the safe passage of their vessel (Jon. i., 12-15), so to make good the welfare of our souls, we must cast out every sin that we may be harbouring.

On Tuesday, Mr. Stephens spoke about Cain's sacrifice, and why it was not accepted, because Cain sinned in offering it. On Wednesday this address was continued, the speaker pointing out the repentance which Cain felt after he had sinned, and which comes to us in exactly the same way.

On Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, Mr. Stephens drew our attention to the subject of repentance and the promises which God had made to those who repented, He showed us that if we repented, God would fulfil the promise He gave to Ezekiel (Ezek. xi., 17, sqq.). We should also continue in faith and bring others to the Lord ; and if at any place we failed, we bad but to turn to Christ and we should be renewed in faith again. We should not have to repent once, but many times, and each time we did so all our former sins would be blotted out. And although Christ Himself bad left this world, if we came to God, He would send us a new comforter, the Holy Ghost, who, though invisible, would guide us as Christ guided His Apostles in former days.

On Monday, November 27th, Mr. Stephens gave his final address The text was 1st Epistle of John iii., 3. He spoke of the « purifying" mentioned there, and showed that if we believed in God we could be thus purified. But when in that state let us beware of spiritual pride, and of saying that when we were saved we need do no more. This was not so, Having been saved, we must do our best to bring others to the same state. He hoped that all of us who had come to Christ would continue in a steadfast Christian life, and that all who had not would soon be brought to the Lord.

T0 look back on past years often causes sadness, and such is the feeling which arises when one's school-days are past. It may sound unnatural to those at school, but the truth will nevertheless become apparent when one's life ceases to be subservient to the tinkling of the school-bell.

Monday, 25th January, 1892, I can well recall. Shakespeare's­
whining school-boy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school,

may have described me later on, but on the first morning I think I felt rather excited, shy, nervous. My reputation as a scholar (latterly falsified) seemed assured when it was found I was to be in the First Form instead of the Preparatory to which I had always been previously allotted by those who hardly appeared to appreciate highly enough my previous erudition. My elder brother led me to my form for prayers, and afterwards I hastened to inform Mr, Hodgetts (who at that time took the First Form) of my name. I was (I remember) much struck by his benignity to me and his first lesson in Science, At it I learnt a fact which I have never forgotten, and which for all I know may still be true (for I have long ago ceased from the study of such subjects), viz.:-when a candle burns nothing is lost. My second lesson was under Mr. Thorburn, at which I gained the reputation of a poor French scholar, which clung to me all through my school-days-and perhaps not unjustly.

The School, of course, seven-and-a-half years ago was so very different. The Lecture Room was just opened. The Manual Training Room was having its foundation stone laid. Sergeant's Lodge did not exist, but Sergeant lived in what is now the Cloak Room and lower part of the Office. The Office was then barely more than a small recess. The Laboratory was used as a regular Class Room and bad forms in it, The approach to the Lecture Room was through a small door instead of the present archway. The ventilating window in the Fifth Class Room was opened at the same time. The desks in the First and Second Class Rooms were just new in 1892. Previously the blaster had sat at the top, and the boys round long tables. One of these is still in the Second Class Room and another was for a long time outside the Fives Court, The Preparatory play-ground did not belong to the School in those days, These years have seen many improvements; but it must be felt to be a very great pity that the neighbourhood of the School is being vulgarised by the new areas of red brick houses.

To turn to the personnel of the School, the changes are very radical. Only two of the staff are the same as in 1892. Then it was-Head Master, Rev. E. Senior; Second Master, Rev. A. B. Haslam; 4th Form, Rev. C. H. Maggs; 3rd Form, Rev. T. ,l. Thorburn; Commercials, Mr. Hennig; 2nd Form, Mr. Latham; 1st Form, Mr. Hodgetts; Preparatory, Mr. Pode and Mr. Brocklehurst.

In addition to the present staff I remember the following come and in turn go:-Messrs. Young, Moore, Barnett, Blandy, Richardson, Barton, Jarvis, Williams, Smith, Groves, Woodward, Borrows, Parker-Mason, S. Chapman, and his brother. The roll of boys is entirely different. 0. Glauert and B. Lister came in January, 1892, The former left last term to win fresh laurels in Cambridge, and the latter (like Tennyson's brook) " goes on-" to win­well, time will show.

Names almost forgotten are Buckler, Wilson, Whittington, Middleton, the elder Blandy, Wortley, Blakeney, Adams, Walsh, Dignam, Chatterton, Williams, the three Chambers, Dunstan, the Darbyshires, the Hahns, the Wings, the eldest Lister, the Seniors, Marples, Wild, Wigful, Brooks, Tulip, Gale, Barker, the Renshaws, Woodcock, the Davidsons, Potts, Bawden, the Robinsons, etc., etc. It is very strange to meet these fellows now in their different pursuits and callings. Some have turned the tables now and are schoolmasters themselves; most are in business. Clergymen, doctors, colonists, bank-clerks, managers, a married man, and an actor are all found in the above list. I may boast that in alt the time I was at school I never was once late, or more strictly speaking, never marked so, for we have not always had such a precise janitor of bell and book as now, The great athlete of those days was Potts. Wild followed him, then Bramley, Haslam, and Cornu. Lister and Williams were the proverbial heroes of the late eighties and the early nineties. It was said they used to habitually send cricket balls over the big school, but there appears to be ground for the supposition that the long bow was drawn in these and like statements.

One very notable change which followed Mr. Haslam's coming was the raising of the classical level of the work. On the other band, now the upper forms are filled with more youngsters, in comparison with the fellows there used to be at the school, and who were found even in the lower forms. All seem much cleverer now, but there are no big fellows left at the school.

The first prize-giving I recall was the one in 1891 (1 think), when Mr. Mundella came and spoke for an hour and three-quarters of our secondary education ! Latter years Canon Ainger, Archdeacon Wilson, Mr. Henry Jackson, Archdeacon Eyre, and Dr. Scott have come. How often have I heard the platitude that it's not always the best follow or the cleverest that gets the prizes.

It is now five years since the first Greek play was given at these functions. It was a scene from f0 The Birds." Middleton, Chatterton, Coore, 0. Glauert, and Dunstan took part in it. It was given without any costume excepting that as representing a goat Glauert wore horns and a mask. " The Cyclops " was given two years later, with Eyre in the title role. There were fantastic and very realistic dresses for this. Williams was the bibulous Silenus, Coombe and Haslam the chorus, the latter as a cow. I was the Ulysses on that occa­sion. The following year there was a scene from Henry VI, with Williams as Falstaff. Eyre and Dalton on the same occasion recited a Jubilee Ode.

Two curious expositions were given at school years ago on temperance and shorthand respectively. All the school attended the former lecture, and essays were afterwards written on it and sent up somewhere, and all (with hardly an exception) received a certificate of merit ! The man who came about the shorthand had apparently no less laudable ideas. He said he would (for two guineas) teach anyone shorthand in a week. He gave a demonstra­tion. But we were sceptical, and, on the subsequent advice of Mr. Senior, no one paid the two guineas, and I have not since heard of the man or his methods.

The Literary and Scientific Society, first started some years before by Mr, Maggs, was revived by Hammond about five or six years ago. The chief feature used to be the antagonism between Derbyshire and Chambers.

The School used to support a cot at the Children's Hospital, and a collection was taken weekly.

The General Election day in 1895 was very exciting. Adams and Stembridge were the chief Liberals. The elementary school boys also were, but they nearly all by the afternoon had exchanged their yellow for blue. Over and over the wall the Liberals were repeatedly thrown. It was little wonder that the weak-kneed supporters of Home Rule veered round.

I have noted down a few memories, but am conscious how inadequate they are, especially on the athletic side, of which perhaps one more competent than myself will write. 1 think most old boys would agree with me in saying that the School and school life is a place and time to be looked back on with affection.         C. COORE.

St. John's College, Cambridge,
November 21st, 1899.

Dear Mr. Editor,

As so many old S.R.G.S. boys have come up here this term, Eyre has naturally turned over to us the pleasant duty of writing to the Magazine, and the lot has fallen upon me.

This term has so far been quiet. We Freshers seem to have settled down very comfortably; strange to say, we have not yet been made the victims of any ghastly jokes, at least I have n't - perhaps the others are hiding deep humiliation under the cloak of silence !

The Freshers' Sports were not remarkable for any feats of Old Grammar School Boys, though if we could have induced Cornu to come up here we should have given a much better account of ourselves. The only success gained by John's was that of Allot, who won the Long Jump with 20 ft. 52 ins. Our College Sports are to come off next week.

Tubbing has proceeded with great energy and enthusiasm. Coore and Goodhart are to row in the Trials at the end of term, and Marsh would have done the same. However, he has suffered a regrettable accident in straining his shoulder, to the great annoyance of his coach, and cannot row any more this term, Coore is also a prominent member of the 'Varsity Volunteer Corps, which is to have a sham fight this week.

The 'Varsity Rugger Team has been doing extremely well. None of their opponents have been able to score a point against them till Blackheath drew with them last Saturday. John's has inflicted a crushing defeat upon Lincoln, Oxford, last week.

The 5th of November passed off quietly here, being Sunday, but there was rather a L° rag" on the Monday following, and several arrests were made. The Proctors were very much in evidence-five out of the six were "on the prowl," and were quite impertinently inquisitive.

Of course everyone here is full of the Transvaal War. The University War Fund was inaugurated at the Union the other evening on the proposal of the Master of Trinity, and the money is rapidly being collected. The war has been the subject of an adjourned debate at the Union ; Mr. Van Lyle, who supported the Boer claims, though a British subject, is a Boer by birth, and has six brothers fighting for Kruger, I am told. It seems that there are generally Boers at Cam­bridge, and they generally go in for the Law Tripos. Smuts, the Chief Attorney of the Transvaal, was at Trinity and was first in both parts of the Law Trip. in the same year, which is a unique success. He will be " wanting a job " soon, let us hope.

All we up here are very interested in the doings at the old School ; accordingly, we were sorry to see that the course of football has not " run smooth." It is a great pity the School has lost Cornu, but no doubt they will soon pull themselves together again, and throw all their energies into beating Wesley College in February,

The Clubs and Societies, I am glad to see, have been reorganized and put under good management; they will no doubt receive a greater amount of support now that they have, as it were, received a new lease of life. I was pleased to see that the School Concerts, which have in the past been so eminently successful under the very able management of B. I. Dalton and Hahn, are now to become a permanent fixture ; also that the Chess Club and Hare and Hounds have been revived.

We were sorry to see that the Marquis of Ripon could not be present on the Speech Day.

Well, I will close now with all good wishes for the School,

Yours sincerely,
G. NORWOOD.

 

Keble College, Oxford,
December, 1899.

Dear Mr. Editor,

Great indeed was my disappointment on scanning the list of 900 or so freshmen (60 of whom came to Keble) to find that the S.R.G.S. had not sent up a single new representative.

I deeply regret this, Mr. Editor, and trust that in the near future matters will take a turn for the better, and that the sister 'Varsity will not continue to monopolise the old boys of the School. Perhaps the fact that you are adopting the Oxford Locals is a good omen for my cause. Senior, Strangeways, and myself are now the only representatives of the School up here (the two former having left the School some years before coming up).

Senior took a 2nd in Litt. Hum. (Greats) in June, and is now at Wycliffe Hall reading for Ordination,

Strangeways (the youngest of three brothers who left the School in '93 or '94) is senior scholar of his year at New, and a certain 1st in Mods. next March.

I myself go down in June, and so have some excuse for regretting the non-arrival of old school-fellows up here.

The 'Varsity were tremendously disappointed on hearing that the Kaiser had abandoned his visit to Oxford, although he paid a visit to the Duke of Marlborough at Blenheim, only seven miles off. A rumour is going abroad that this was due to a whisper having reached his ears to the effect that a large consignment of Kaiser moustaches had been imported into Oxford to be worn as favours in his honour.

We hope to give Cambridge a warm time in footer, both in Association and Rugby, as our teams shape well, chiefly owing to the acquisition of several good freshmen.

The 'Varsity Soccer Team have had almost an unbroken record this term, beating the London Caledonians, Southampton, Old Etonians, etc., but succumbing to Wolverhampton Wanderers.

Keble have undoubtedly the strongest Rugby team in the 'Varsity. It includes three blues and several trial men.

Magdalen have won the coxless fours on the river, beating Balliol, in spite of the latter college having had five blues in the last 'Varsity eight ; a fact which makes some people think that the choice of rowing blues is not so free from bias as it might be.

Several undergraduates have gone out to the Cape. A Keble friend of mine who was reading for the Army up bore, intending to enter as a 'Varsity candidate, was unable to rest in his martial ardour. He enlisted in the 1st Dragoons shortly after the beginning of term as a " Privileged Volunteer," and is now at the front, somewhere in Natal.

With best wishes, Mr. Editor, to the old School.

Yours very sincerely,
ACLAND F. O'N. WILLIAMS.

A VERY successful opening meeting of this Club was held on Oct. 28th, at the usual time, in the Boarding Hall, when 12 or 14 members attended. Several of those present had only the most elementary ideas of Chess, but were quickly enlightened by other members. As there was only one set of draughtsmen, the number playing that game was naturally extremely limited.

The second meeting was held on Nov. 11th. In spite of the inclemency of the weather, 14 members were present. During the preceding week, half-a-dozen sets of draughtsmen and boards were procured, and therefore there was plenty of variety. The seances will in future start at 7 and continue till 8.30,

THE first Chess Match was held on Wednesday, Nov. 22nd, between Sharrow and Hallam houses. There were three boards engaged. Barnes, Sharrow's third board, soon beat Turnbull I, and this opening success was, followed, later on, by wins at the other two boards; Kirk succumbing, through a slip, to Allison, and Turn­bull II being crushed by Dalton. Sharrow thus gets 10 points.

THE first run of the season took place on Wednesday, Nov. 1st, to Fulwood. G. ILL. Cornu (O.B.), E. W. L. Thomas (O.B.), and H. B. Groves, Esq., were hares. About a dozen hounds turned up, half of whom lasted the run out. The hares started at 2-40 p.m., and arrived home at 3-20 p.m. The hounds started at 2-50 p.m., and arrived home in the following order:-I, Coombe (Park), 6 points, 3-45 p.m. ; 2, Dunnill (Sharrow), 5 points ; 3, Davies I (Sharrow), 4 points ; 4, Blandy (Park), 3 points ; 5, Hartle (Sharrow), 2 points ; 6, Marsh (Park), 1 point, 3-55 p.m. Sharrow thus winning by 1 point.

S.R.G.S. v. DONCASTER G.S.

This, the first match of the season, was played on Wednesday, 27th of September, at Broomhall Park, and ended in favour of S.R.G.S. by five goals to none. Owing to the late start it was arranged that 36 minutes only should be played each way. We, having lost the toss, had to play downhill. At the start the home forwards ran down, and Coombe narrowly missed scoring. Shortly afterwards, during a scrimmage in the Doncaster goal mouth, Dunnill put the ball through, scoring the first goal of the season for the school. The home team still pressed, forcing frequent corners, Just before half-time, Coombe, who was doing good work on the right wing, again ran down and shot, the Doncaster goal-keeper being unable to save­just touching the ball as it went through. Half-time came with the score at 2-0 in our favour. On resuming, the Doncaster forwards came down with a rush, but afterwards did not often get beyond the half-line. Coombe again ran the ball up, out-racing his opponents,

and centred, Barton putting on our third goal, the fourth being added by Coombe. Towards the close, one of the Doncaster backs fouled within the twelve yards line, in front of goal, thus giving a penalty to our team. This was taken by Coombe, who succeeded in scoring, thus recording the fifth goal for the home team. Time came with the score unaltered. The team played well together, Froggatt centering nicely, but not always finding the centre forward far enough up to be able to shoot to any effect. The School defence is doubtless sure, but was not taxed to any extent.

Team :-Merryweather (goal) ; Lister, Davis I (backs) ; Furnival, Earle, Allison (half-backs); L. J. Coombe, Barton, Dunnill, Froggatt, Davies II. (forwards).

S.R.G.S. v. HASTINGS.

Played at Crosspool, on Saturday, 30th of September, ending in a win for the home team by nine goals to two.

The School, losing the toss, kicked down hill against a strong wind. Hastings, from the commencement, proved that they were the stronger team, and, after some mid-field play, they scored, this goal being followed soon after by a second. School then forced a corner, and from it H. Chambers scored, Hastings still kept their lead by scoring a third goal after a scrimmage. A fourth goal soon followed, and before half-time Hastings scored a fifth, which, to the spectators, seemed to bean off side point. At half-time the score was 5-2.

After the interval, Hastings attacked and kept the ball in the school half most of the time, scoring four more goals before the whistle blew, thus making the score 9-2. against us. Furnival was the best of the halves, and Coombe of the forwards.

S.R.G.S. v. CHESTERFIELD G.S.

Played at Chesterfield, on Wednesday, the 4th of October. School, for the third time, lost the toss. At the commencement the game was very even, both goals being visited. Coombe ran the ball up and put it in the centre, but the home backs cleared. Chesterfield then attacked, and a scrimmage took place in our goal mouth, but Hooson saved. Soon after the home team obtained the first corner of the game, but it was cleared by our backs. We attacked, and Coombe put in a good centre, but the other forwards were not there to put it through. The home team then attacked, and after about 35 minutes play, scored. School then pressed until half-time. After the kick-off we attacked, but could not score at this stage of the game-the passing of our forwards was very poor. Later, Froggatt, obtaining the ball, passed into the centre, and the home left back missing his kick left a clear course for Coombe, who scored first goal for us. Just before time, the home team pressed and scored what appeared to be an offside goal. On the kick-off the home team again pressed, but Furnival cleared. Final score :-Chesterfield, 2 goals ; Sheffield, 1 goal.

S.R.G.S. v. F. J. INNOCENT'S XI,

Played at Broomhall Park, Saturday, October 7th. Coombe won the toss for the first time this season, and elected to play uphill. In the first half the game was very hard fought and even. At half-time the score was 0-0, and for some time in the second half it looked as if no goal would be scored for either side, But about the middle of the second half King (O.B.) rushed down, and after a very fine run scored with a good quick shot. This put the School ahead, and they further added another goal, when after a foul in front of the goal within the twelve yards' line., Bramley scored by a very good and hard shot. The whistle soon sounded, the School being victorious by 2-0.

S.R.G.S. V. RETFORD G, S.

Played at Retford, on Saturday, Oct. 14th, 1899. We won the toss and kicked with the sun and a slight wind. The game opened very evenly, but Retford being the heavier team had a great advantage over us. Frequent alterations were made in our team, but were of no avail, and the interval found us in a minority of 3-0. The second half was little better than the first, and we ultimately lost by 8-1.

S.R.G.S. v. BANKERS' 1sT.

Played on Thursday, October 19th, at Wadsley Bridge. We were helped by two or three old boys in this game, but at the last minute found ourselves with ten men only. The Bankers were kind enough to give us a substitute. At the start the Bankers' weight told, and the team seemed to funk, with one or two exceptions. The Bankers attacked our goal, and if we had not had such a reliable goal-keeper as Cornu they would have scored freely. We held our own very well

during the first half, thanks to the untiring efforts of Wild (0.8.), who did the work of three or four men. In the second half the Bankers increased their lead from 2-0 to 6 0, and when time came the School eleven seemed to be thankful that the game was at an end.

S.R.G.S. v, ROTHERHAM G.S.

Played at Rotherham on Wednesday, 25th October.

The toss having been won by Coombe, he elected to play uphill. The field was in a somewhat uneven state which doubtless accounted for the forwards on the left wing being unable to play up to their usual standard. Rotherham pressed, and after some play on the left wing, in which the ball was very frequently put out of play, scored, and not very long afterwards added another goal to their credit. The School were not very disheartened but tried hard to score. A little More half-time, Froggatt scored with a good shot. As, however, Rotherham scored again immediately, when the whistle blew we were two goals to the bad. When playing down S.R.G.S. had most of the game, but only put the ball through once, a very fine goal shouldered by Barton off a good corner by Coombe. Rotherham put on a fourth goal a short time before the end of play, and thus won by 4-2.

Team:-Hartley (goal) ; Lister, Davies I (backs) ; Furnival, Coombe, Hooson (half-backs); Dunnill, Merryweather, Barton, Earle, Froggatt (forwards).

S.R.G.S. v. WESLEY COLLEGE,

Played at home on Saturday, 28th of October. The toss having being lost, the School played down hill, and for one or two minutes pressed. Our hopes of gaining a victory over the College this term were never very great, and the score shows that it was by no means a lucky win for the College, but that they were superior to us both in weight and play. The scoring soon began ; the College ran the ball up and Simpson scored. After some play near the School goal, the home team ran the ball down, and by a splendid shot by Coombe was within an ace of scoring, the ball just falling on the top of the crossbar. The School defended very well in the first half, although four goals wore scored by the College. In the second half the team altogether lost heart, and although one or two of the team did their best, the rest seemed in a dream, waiting for the ball to come to them. Lister, who had been hurt in the first half, had to stop playing soon after the commencement of the second half, thus the School finishing with ten men only. The score when the whistle blew was 11-0 in favour of the College, Simpson the Wesley College centre forward scored no fewer than 9 out of the 11.

Team :-Merryweather (goal) ; Lister, Davies I (backs) ; Cockayne I, Furnival, Dunnill (half-backs) ; Coombe, Moorwood I, Barton, Davies II. Froggatt (forwards).

S.R.G.S, V. BANKERS II.

Played at the School on Thursday, Nov. 2nd. Coombe lest the toss and the home team kicked down bill. Soon after the start, which was made at 3 p.m., Davies II had a very good chance of scoring, but the Bankers' back bore down upon him, which seemed to rather upset him, and the ball was sent to the top end of the field. Cornu (O.B.), who was our custodian, saved well from a very good ,hot, but in doing so put the ball over the crossbar, thus giving a corner to the Bankers. The danger was averted and the School held its own well till half-time. On changing ends, the School forwards several times ran the ball up well, but the shooting was poor and ill directed. A short time before the end the Bankers scored a somewhat lucky goal, and though our team tried hard to equalize, time came with no alteration in the score.

Team-Cornu (O.B.) (goal) ; Perrott (O.B.), Davies I (backs) ; Hooson, Earl, Furnival (half-backs) ; Coombe, Merryweather, Barton, Davies II, Froggatt (forwards).

S.R.G.S. O.B.A. v. D.G.S. O.B.A.

Nov. 7th witnessed a new departure in the annals of the O.B.A., as the first of home and home matches with the Doncaster Old Boys took place.

The first half was evenly contested, the Doncaster Boys scoring twice, one of which goals was given by one of our backs. The second half consisted for the most part in a fierce attack on our goal, but splendid work by Cornu prevented any further score. After about twenty minutes of this the siege was raised, and we were distinctly unlucky in not scoring at least twice.

Result :-Doncaster O.B.A., 2 Goals ; Sheffield O.B.A,, 0 goal.

Team: - Cornu (goal) ; Perrott and Davies (backs) ; Walker, Thomas, Frost (half-backs) ; Innocent, A. N. Other, Brown, Price, Chambers (forwards).

S.R.G.S. V. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.

Played on our ground on Wednesday, the 8th of November. School lost the toss and kicked down hill. The opening stages of the game were very even; School soon forced a corner on the right but nothing came of it. The visitors then broke away and almost scored, but Cornu saved. The visiting forwards still kept up the pressure and forced another corner but the School backs cleared the danger. The School forwards then broke away, Barton and Coombe putting in good shots. We still kept up the pressure and obtained a foul in the visitors' goal mouth, but after a scrimmage the ball was cleared ; soon after half-time arrived with the score sheet still blank. The opening stages of the second half were much like the first half, both teams attacking in turn. The visitors pressed hard but the home defence prevailed. From a sudden breakaway by the visiting forwards they scored. On the kick-off School pressed, and from a charge against Froggatt, by the left back, we obtained a foul close upon the visitors' goal, but we could not bring about the downfall of the visitors' defence, and School were pressing hard when time arrived with the score:­University College, 1 goal; S.R.G.S., 0 goal.

Team ,--Cornu (goal) ; Perrot (O.B.), Davies (backs) ; Mr. King, Merryweather, Mr. Merrikin (half-backs); Coombe, Barton, Mr. Humphreys, Price (O.B.), Froggatt (forwards).

It is with regret that we record the death of
DR. HUGH RHODES,

Of HIGHFIELD PLACE, SHEFFIELD.

Dr. RHODES was educated at the Dronfield and Sheffield Grammar Schools,
and subsequently at Glasgow University, where he had a most distinguished career.
His early decease at the age of 34 years deprives Sheffield
of one of its most brilliant professional men, and ourselves of an old and esteemed friend.

[Hugh Rhodes obit in the BMJ - ed.]

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