IT is with great pleasure that we record a fresh departure in the management of the School Magazine. The Editorial staff has been augmented by the appointment of Coombe I and Pate, while each House is represented by its particular Secretary :-Haslam (Hallam), Lister I (Park), Glauert (Sharrow), and Walker (Town), being the first appointments to the newly created offices. The, Games Committee will be represented by its Hon. Secretary, Mr. Young ; the newly amalgamated Literary and Science Society by its Hon. Secretary; A. E. Dunstan ; while Glauert will attend to the interests of the Chess Club. The practice obtainable in conducting even a School Magazine may, we trust, prove of service to some of our boys in after life, while we have every confidence that the Magazine will be greatly benefited by the added energy. " In the multitude of counsels there is -" something, we just now forget exactly what, but at any rate one excellent suggestion has been made by a new member of the Editorial Committee, and we believe there will be plenty more to follow.

EXCURSION TO RINGINGLOWE.

On Saturday, July 18th, the Science Society had one of its most successful excursions, viz. :-to Ringinglowe. The meet was fixed for 2-30 at Hunter's Bar, and- mirabile dictu -there were ten of us there at the appointed time. We were very pleased to find that two fellows were thoughtful enough to bring their cameras, which proved extremely useful afterwards. As might be expected, the ubiquitous " bike " was present-two of the fellows bringing their machines, one of which was turned to good account on the homeward journey, by carrying in turn the younger members of the party. Well, we started about 2-40, and proceeded through Endcliffe Woods-the two cyclists, however, went on the road, and met three more of our party at Ecclesall Church. The Endcliffe Woods looked their best in the bright July sunshine, and certainly they form the prettiest park about Sheffield, their plentiful water supply greatly enhancing their other natural beauties. Passing right through Whiteley Woods, we at length came into the Ringinglowe road, having had an extremely pleasant walk so far. Here we met the others of our party, and we proceeded to the Norfolk Arms, where tea was ordered. We now came straight on to the moors, and wandering from the road began our work in earnest. The party broke up into sections, some went in for purely botanical work, others took insects, and some, who evidently had greater breadth of mind-and pockets, took everything that came to hand. The ants alone would well repay detailed study here. On turning over any stone, a little colony of these insects is disclosed. Underneath one we found a tremendous lot of eggs, and greatly admired the strength and persistence of these marvelous creatures in carrying them away down their underground passages. In some places we got splendid views of the nests by tearing away a few sods of grass, thus causing a vertical section to be made. The ants, startled by the sudden irruption and the presence of light, which they greatly dislike-it causing them to feel unsafe-were hurrying hither and thither in confusion communicating with each other by touching their antennae. We saw their galleries, cut with marvellous precision and beautifully smooth. On these layers of eggs and larva were to be seen, arranged in sets of different sizes and in different stages of development. Meanwhile in the part we had broken off, ants and larva lay in a complete muddle, but soon the instinct of these creatures came into play-each ant seized a larva and made off with it, and scaling the almost perpendicular face of the nest, safely deposited its burden in one of the galleries. So great was the confusion, that in many cases we saw the incoming and outgoing ants blocking each other's way in the galleries, neither party wishing to give way.

In a great many cases, we thought, these ants would give useful lessons to human beings even. Photographs of two of the nests were taken, thus showing the utility of the camera in this kind of work - and here may I ask all fellows who have cameras to come with us on our next excursion, for there is ample material for them.

Meanwhile others of the party were wandering about, and some splendid specimens of the corn sedge (Eriophorum Polystachym) and many mosses were seen. Further on a patch of the bog asphodel (Narthecium 0ssifragum) was observed and several specimens taken.

About this time certain inward tokens made us remember that it was tea-time, and so we adjourned our work unanimously and went to the Norfolk Arms where we feasted. From the look of astonishment when more provisions were called for, it was evident that the people there were not accustomed to see the British school-boy when he is hungry. Tea over, work was resumed, and then it was rumoured that one of the photographers was eager to get a photo of the Society. After the ordeal we were very sorry to have to part with Mr. Overend, who had been quite a " guide, philosopher, and friend " to us all. After another hour, during which we caught a lot of ants, beetles, moths, and other beasts, we started for home, securing on the way a frog (which the Secretary promptly impounded for dissection) and noticing the splendid tints of the clouds at sunset, all having agreed that they had had a jolly good time.

The twenty-second meeting of this Society was held in the Lecture Room, on Wednesday morning, July 15th, 1896, Mr. Overend in the chair. The following are the officers for the ensuing session:- President: Dr. Sorby, F.R.S.; Vice-Presidents: Rev. E. Senior, M.A., Mr. J. H. Hodgetts, Mr. Overend, Mr. Latham, Dr. Stokes ; Secretary A. E. Dunstan ; Librarians : 0. Glauert and Walker ; Committee : Mr. L. Glauert, 0. Glauert, Walker, Coombe, and Barnes, and the Masters ex-officio.

The next meeting of this Society was held on Wednesday, July 22nd, 1896; A. E. Dunstan in the chair.

The minutes of last meeting were read and confirmed.

It was decided that two prizes should be given for the two best collections of Natural History specimens-the Science Society Committee being judges. The competition should be confined to the Preparatory and first three forms of the School. It was arranged that different sections of the members should, if possible, make collections of objects in the districts allotted to them, with a view to increasing the Museum specimens.

Barnes was elected Curator of the Museum.

At the meeting held on July 29th, the Secretary read the Annual Report, in which he mentioned that the last session (1895-6) had been extremely successful, the attendance averaging 33-a number which, when compared with the number of boys in the School, speaks volumes for the need and utility of the Science Society.

Papers have been read by Mr. Moor on "A Chapter in Geology ;" by Dr. Latham on " Musical Instruments;" by A. E. Dunstan on "A Piece of Chalk" and "The New Photography ;" by L. Glauert on " Caves;" and by Walker on " Norwich."

The Report also stated the great loss the Society had felt owing to Mr. Moor's departure from the School-for Mr. Moor had a great deal to do with starting the Society, and during all the time he was connected with the School he did his utmost to promote the interests of the Science Society by encouraging the study of Natural History amongst the boys, by giving Papers before the Society, and by constant attendance at the meetings.

As for the Finances, the Secretary stated that there was only a small balance over, and as money is always needed for Museum requisites, postage, &c., and, moreover, as the Society wished to give prizes for collections, it would be very convenient to keep a larger balance. To do this, it was determined that a small subscription should be fixed.

As a large number of specimens was expected after the holidays, the following were appointed Sub-Secretaries to receive and classify the objects allotted to them :­

Geology: A. E. Dunstan : Botany : L. Glauert and Barnes ; Entomology : Lister I and Mitchell ; Zoology : A. E. Dunstan ; Archaeology : Walker.

RAMSEY is the second town in the Isle of Man in point of size, population, and capacity for accommodating seekers of health and pleasure. It is situated on the north-east coast of the island, about 17 miles north of Douglas. It combines all the elements of a peaceful seaside resort with the rural charms of a village and the conveniences of a town. It is said to be so easy of access that the people in any part of the three countries­England, Scotland, and Ireland-can breakfast at home and dine at Ramsey. I am not so positive on this point, because we started from the Sheffield Midland Station at 8.25 a.m. and got to Ramsey soon after 7 o'clock at night, being six and-a-half hours on the water ; but some of the delay was due to the water being so rough. When we got there we were greeted with " hurrahs ! " which, we found out, was the usual thing when the people knew that the boat " Peveril " was coming in from Liverpool, because most of the people are ill and require encouragement.

There are plenty of good shops there, and I think it may be fairly said that for variety of supply and moderation in charges few small towns can surpass them.

Italy and the south of France are resorted to by many invalids because of the reputed mildness of the climate, but the difference between the winter temperature of Montpelier and the Isle of Man is only 1 degree. I should think they do not go to the Isle of Man because they do not like the idea of crossing the water. At Milan the winter temperature is more than 5 degrees colder than it is in the Island.

Now, as to the attractions.-First, there is the bathing, which is, as some people think, the chief thing. The beach at Ramsey is perfectly safe, Vans are provided on the south shore, but if the more skilled and accomplished swimmer scorns the use of a van, there are two or three ways he may bathe. There are numerous clefts and crevices in the rocks below the vans from which he can enjoy a dip; or, he can undress on the shore, as many do. Others go. straight from home, barefoot, with only their bathing dress on and a coat or macintosh over their shoulders, then, when they get out, they do not bother to dry on the sand, but go home wet and dry before a fire. I tried this last method once, and then I nearly always did it. There is, of course, boating and sailing on a very extensive scale. Ramsey has the reputation of having some of the finest rowing boats that can be seen at almost any watering place in England. The bay is so large that there is no occasion to go beyond the headlands, and there are no treacherous currents to endanger the lives of un­wary strangers. A pleasant boating trip is from the harbour up the river Sulby. On a summer's day scores of boats may be seen wending their way up­stream, and the day's pleasure is enhanced and varied by the occupants of the boats pic-nicing on the banks of the river ; but I must say that the river may only be ascended when the tide is up. Boating or sailing may be had also on the lake of the Mooragh, of which I shall speak later. As for sailing yachts, they are the pride of the owners and the joy of the visitors. Manned by reliable, steady, and skilled sailors, no one need fear to entrust himself to them, and the pleasure of a few hour's sail combined with the excitement of a little fishing will not speedily be forgotten.

The Bahama Lightship, which is moored about six miles off Ramsey Bay, is well worth a visit, and affords an enjoyable afternoon's sail. There are eight men comprising the crew of the Lightship, and they always welcome the appearance of visitors. Then there are three piers. The North and South Piers on each side of the harbour are 131 yards long, and at the head of each is a lighthouse, whose lamps are about 30 feet above the sea, and can be seen four miles away : that on the North Pier shows a green and the other a red light. Steamers can lie alongside the piers at most conditions of the tide, and, when they cannot do so, they make for the new low-water landing pier, Queen's Pier. It will certainly enhance the popularity of the town, affording, as it does, a marine promenade of 720 yards, and providing a safe and con­venient berth for steamers at all states of the tide. As Ramsey Bay lies in the direct course across channel it is expected that the pier will be the means of gradually, but very materially, increasing its steam communication. The outer end is composed of iron columns with girders on the lattice prin­ciple, and immense green-heart piles, is 280 feet in length, and has every con­venience for the embarkation and landing of passengers, a commodious waiting room, and also a refreshment room. The open or inner work is 1880 feet, and composed of iron columns screwed into the clay by hydraulic pressure, and supporting strong iron girders also on the lattice principle. The Quay has recently been improved ; its wall has been entirely rebuilt for about three­quarters of the entire length, and several additional flights of steps have been constructed. The accommodation afforded by the harbour is generally suffi­cient for the vessels frequenting the port, but it is occasionally quite crowded, and sometimes represents a " forest of masts." On the other side of the harbour, facing West Street, is the shipyard, which has fallen into disuse. Across the harbour is the swing bridge, which connects the so-called north and south parts of the town and gives ready access to both. It is 290 feet long and weighs 230 tons; it moves on 20 cast-steel rollers, and is worked by two men only. This is swung when large vessels want to get into the river side of the harbour to unload goods.

One of the most prominent objects seen by visitors on approaching the bay is the tower erected to commemorate the visit of Prince Albert in the year 1847. His Royal Highness stood on this spot to view Ramsey and its neighbourhood during the visit of her Majesty the Queen to Ramsey in September of that year. The way to the top is easily climbed by the nimble, and the view from the summit will induce all visitors to share Prince Albert's admiration. On a clear day one can see Cumberland, Mull of Galloway, and the Mourne Mountains from the top of the tower.

The Mooragh Park, previously referred to, used to be a desert waste, but it has been transformed by the Town Commissioners into a pleasant resting place, as I may call it. Running from the harbour side along the north shore for a distance of nearly a mile, is a spacious concrete promenade, with a neat and substantial sea wall. This promenade is wider and handsomer than any other in the Isle of Man. At the rear of the houses on the Mooragh Pro­menade are the Park and Marine Lake, which must be counted absolutely unique in the attractions of a watering place. In the park all kinds of games and amusements may be indulged in, such as tennis, bowls, &c., while on the lake is a fleet of boats, any of which the visitor may hire for a small sum, and, better still, the water in the lake is so shallow that if you fell in you could walk out again, it being about 3 feet in the deepest place. The park admir­ably serves the purpose of invalids, being amply provided with seats and shelters. A prominent feature in the park is the old lifeboat, 11 The Two Sisters," which occupies a position on a small island in the centre of the lake. This weather-beaten old craft has been the means of saving 147 lives and 12 vessels. The lake is filled from time to time by the tide.

The favourite sport is fishing. The sea is perfectly clear, and from the end of the Queen's Pier large quantities of fish are hooked every day in the summer by visitors. If you get a licence you can catch plenty of trout, and, sometimes, a small salmon in the river Sulby. The Isle of Man is sometimes called the Isle of Glens. There are several about Ramsey. Ballure Glen used to be one of the finest in the island, but the water has now almost entirely disappeared. This glen is chiefly used by artists, and people who like to go and have their tea there. About half-an-hour's walk from Ramsey is Glen Aldyn, which is visited by scores daily, and who have their dinner or tea at Dr. Clucan's grounds, which are in the middle of the glen. What makes it look so pretty is that wild fuchsias are growing on the banks of the streams. Coming back to the town itself, we may point out the Palace in Waterloo Road, a new place of amuse­ment, in which theatrical entertainments are given during the summer months by English companies. There are a bowling green and tennis courts in the grounds adjoining the palace. At the Pavilion, too, facilities are offered for tennis. At Milntown-on the way to Glen Aldyn, a few minutes' walk from Ramsey-golf links ara laid, and every facility is offered visitors to play this popular game. The links were laid under the supervision of the veteran Tom Morris, of St. Andrews, and are said to be equal to any found across the waters. The roads in the north are especially good, and suitable for cycling. A rider may select many routes without hills, and he can ride for miles upon fine, level, well-kept roads.

W. A. G. B.

A General Meeting was held in the Lecture Room, on Thursday, September 24th, 1896, after School ; A. E. Dunstan in the chair. The Chairman explained that the meeting had been convened to consider the advisability of amalgamating the Literary Society and the Scientific Society, seeing that only two of the Committee of the former Society were still at School.

It was proposed by Middleton and seconded by Glauert that the two societies should be amalgamated, and this was carried unanimously. In order to bring the Committee up to eight, so that there might be a Science section and a Literary section of four members each, Eyre was elected to fill the vacancy.

The following are the officers for the ensuing session :-Presidents Rev. E. Senior, M.A., and H. C. Sorby, Esq., LL. D., F.R.S. ; Vice­Presidents : J. N. Coombe, Esq., R. N. Blandy, Esq., M.A., J. H. Hodgetts, Esq., B.A. B.Sc., J. Latham, Esq., LL.D., B.A., F. L. Overend, Esq., B.A., F.C.S., J. Stokes, Esq., M.D., J. H. Young, Esq., B.A.; Secretary and Treasurer : A. E. Dunstan ; Committee : The Masters, ex-officio, Science Section-Dunstan, Barnes, L. Glauert, and Walker ; Literary Section-Coombe I, Eyre, Glauert, and Middleton ; Science Librarians : Walker and Glauert ; Museum Curator : Barnes.

The first meeting of the amalgamated Literary and Scientific Society was held on Wednesday evening, Sept. 30th, 1896; Mr. Blandy in the chair. The minutes of the last meeting of the Science Society were read and confirmed. The Secretary briefly brought before the notice of the meeting the fact that the hitherto separate Literary and Scientific Societies had been amalgamated, and he expressed a hope that all the meetings of the new Society would be attended by those who before had come only to the meetings of one Society.

The Chairman then called upon Mr. L. Glauert (O.B.) to read his paper on " The Action of Breakers on the Sea Coast." The paper dealt with the continual denudation which is taking place in particular upon the coast, due, in great measure, to the ceaseless attrition and friction caused by the lumps of rock which are dashed against the cliffs by the breakers. Several illustrations were given to show that while this is happening on one side of a promontory, for instance, the reverse is taking place on the other side, as is the case with Dungeness. At the end of this interesting paper a few remarks were made on the sub­ject matter of the paper by Mr. Blandy, Coombe I, and Dunstan, and the meeting terminated with votes of thanks unanimously accorded to Mr. L. Glauert for his paper, and Mr. Blandy for his kindness in taking the chair.        

A. E. DUNSTAN, Hon. Sec.

FEW sports can claim to have reached such a pitch of popular favour, in such a comparatively short time, as cycling. A bicycle in some form or other has been ridden for years, but the safety is only about ten years old, and the pneumatic tyre has scarcely seen its sixth year, yet in spite of the recentness of the invention the popularity of cycling is widespread. This is scarcely to be wondered at, as it is a new means of motion, is far quicker than walking, and cheaper and more convenient than driving or riding a horse.

The bicycle is useful for business men to ride every morning into the town and return again in the evening, and I for one can testify to the conveni­ence of riding to school on one. But apart from riding to work, how great is the pleasure of riding in the country, a pleasure which is amply testified to by the hundreds that one sees on a Saturday afternoon. Another great pleasure is touring, taking your bicycle by train, say to Kendal for the Lakes, or to Coventry for the beautiful Midland counties. In fine weather there can be no more delightful way of seeing the country than on a bicycle, utterly independent of railways, conveyances, and even time itself. The immense popularity of cycling has created employment for thousands. This industry has made Beeston, and remade Coventry. Coventry, which was on the verge of ruin when ribbons went out of fashion, took to cycle making, and now its works employ thousands, importing many from Birmingham, and the ribbon trade only seems to figure in geography books. But besides Coventry, every Mid­land town of any size now has its bicycle factory. No other sport can be said to have created a great industry. Who has heard of a town springing into existence through making cricket bats, or croquet balls, or tennis racquets ? The bicycle has been brought to a great pitch of excellence. I heard the other day of an American, 6ft. 5.5 in. high, and weighing 36 stones, riding a machine weighing only 28lbs. It is a regrettable fact that bicycles are so badly treated by railway companies. They charge for them and pile them up in the ordinary luggage vans, giving you a ticket stating that they will not be responsible for any injury that may befall them. In many respects cycling is preferable, I think, to football or cricket, both of which need a special ground and a number to play. Cycling needs but a road, which one can always find. Sheffield, although in itself it is anything but an ideal place for cycling, has very fine rides in the immediate neighbourhood.  

C. C.

The examination of the Royal Drawing Society resulted as follows :­

FIRST DivisioN. - Honours : F. S. Wood, Andrews, Machon, J. C. Lockwood, Swindell, G. F. Wood, Myers, Liversidge, J. S. King, J. A. Crowther, J. Brown, J. Davis, W. R. Smith. Pass : R. E. Carr, B. V. Thompson, L. Wing, B. Lister, W. Edwards, A. E. Archer, J. H. Bookless, H. Buck, H. W. Turnbull, A. C. Smith, C. E. Brierly, W. K. Dalton, C. M. Johnson, A. P. Turnbull, F. Ward.

SECOND DIvisION. - Honours : J. H. Machon, G. E. Wood, J. A. Crowther, J. S. King. Pass : F. A. Camm, J. Brown, J. R. Swinscoe, W. Andrew, J. Myers, A. E. Archer, S. Pearson, F. J. Innocent, W. Thomas, W. A. Forsdike, G. M. Cornu, K. E. Kirk, Oates, G. Forsdike, W. K. Dalton, S. D. Williams, H. P. Foers.

THIRD DIVISION. -Honours : E. H. Furnival, B. H. Brown, H. N. Burbidge, E. H. Turner, J. T. Binney. Pass : W. B. Douthwaite, J. Twigg, C. F. Bond, W. R. Binney.

FOURTH DIVISION.-Honours: H. Hattersley, N. E. Lean. Pass G. B. Cockayne.

S.R.G.S. v. ROTHERHAM G.S.

This match was played on the School ground on July 18th.

S.R.G.S.

 

ROTHERHAM G.S.

 

Thomas I, run out

5

Nicholson, b Lean

0

Thomas II, b Wheatcroft

3

Hickmott, b Binney

9

Hallam, b Wheatcroft

2

Wheatcroft, b Lean

7

Burton, b Beevers

5

Smith, c Burton, b Lean

0

Lean, b Wheatcroft

1

Beevers, b Binney

0

Bramley, not out ..

32

Everatt, b Binney

5

Wood, run out .

0

Cook, b Binney ..

4

Binney, b Beevers

0

Hirst, b Binney ..

0

Steel, run out

15

Beaumont, not out

7

Cornu, c Beaumont, b Wells

0

Wells, b Binney ..

0

Twigg, b Hirst ..

13

Williams, b Lean

4

Extras

28

Extras

8

Total

104

Total..

44

BOWLING ANALYSIS,-S.R.G.S.

 

Overs,

Maidens,

Runs.

Wickets.

Hallam

6

4

4

0

Lean

1.3

3

23

4

Binney

10

2

9

6

PAST V. PRESENT.

The final fixture of the season, played on the School ground, July 22nd. The School was weakened by the unavoidable absence of the Head Master and Mr. Young, but had the assistance of the President on the occasion. A very enjoyable game resulted in a decisive victory for "Present."

PAST.

 

PRESENT.

 

H. S. Darbyshire, b Hallam

0

Mr. Overend, b Lister

3

W. Parkin, b Hallam . ,

14

Mr. Hodgetts, b Lister ..

16

A. B. Chambers, b Lean..

4

Rev. J. Darbyshire, b Parkin ..

17

L. Lister, b Lean. ,

0

Lean, c Darbyshire, b Chambers

25

S. Maleham, lbw, b Lean

3

Hallam, b Chambers     . ,

1

W. T. Campsall, b Binney

19

Bramley, c Darbyshire, b Chambers  

13

Dr. Stokes, b Lean

1

Burton, b Chambers     ..

13

J, Blakeney, b Binney

6

Steel, c Darbyshire, b Parkin ..

0

C. Robinson, b Binney ..

3

Binney, b Chambers

1

J. G. Chambers, c and b Mr. Hodgetts.

0

Thomas II, b Parkin

1

R. C, Gould, not out

2

Thomas I, not out         , .

0

Extras

6

Extras

21

Total ..

58

Total ..

111

BOWLING ANALYSIS.-S.R.G.S.

 

Overs.

Mdns.

Runs,

Wickets.

Hallam

9

1

18

2

Lean

10

1

19

4

Binney

5

0

8

3

Mr. Hodgetts

3.6

2

7

1

HOUSE MATCHES.

HALLAM HOUSE v. TOWN HOUSE.

First Innings

TOWN HOUSE.

Second Innings.

Hampton, b Lean ..

2

b Lean..

1

Beaumont, b Lean ..

3

b Binney II ..

2

Forsdike I, b Lean ..

0

   

Forsdike III, b Lean

1

   

Burton, not out ..

28

b Lean

8

Walker, c Binney II, b Lean

2

(sub.) not out

1

Turner II, b Lean ..

6

b Lean

0

King, run out

1

b Binney II ..

1

Waterfall, c and b Lean

1

c Greenwood, b Binney II ..

0

Buck, c Douthwaite, b Lean

10

b Binney II ..

5

Lee, b Lean ..

1

c Coombe, b Lean ..

2

Extras ..

8

Extras ..

6

Total

63

Total ..

26

First Innings

HALLAM HOUSE.

Second Innings.

 

Darbyshire, b Burton

2

     
 

Bramley, b King , .

10

b Waterfall ..

1

 
 

Douthwaite, b Burton    ..

0

     
 

Greenwood, run out , .

27

run out  . .

2

 
 

Binney II, b King ..

4

not out  ..

0

 
 

Lean, b Waterfall

13

c Hampton, b Waterfall

4

 
 

Cornu, c Lee, b Turner ..

0

     
 

Coombe, not out

1

not out

2

 
 

Lockwood, b Waterfall

2

     
 

James, c and b Waterfall

0

     
 

Briggs, absent

0

     
 

Extras ..

13

Extras ..

11

 
 

Total

72

Total

20

 

TOWN HOUSE v. SHARROW HOUSE.

First Innings,

Town House.    Second Innings.

 

Beaumont, b Hahn ..

0

c Davies, b Brown II

17

Hampton, b Huxley..

0

b Wing I

7

Walker, b Huxley . ,

0

b Hahn

0

Burton, b Hahn

2

b Huxley

0

Buck, b Huxley

8

b huxley

4

King, b huxley

7

b Wing I

4

Forsdike III, c Brown, b Hahn

4

b Huxley

8

Turner, not out  . ,

2

c Brown II, b Huxley

2

Waterfall, c and b Hahn

2

c Hydes, b Huxley ..

11

Lee, run out ..

1

not out  ,

, 1

May, b Huxley

0

c Brown II, b Huxley

2

Extras ..

„ 6

Extras ..

8

Total

32

Total ..

64

First Innings.

SHARROw HousE.     Second Innings.

   

Hattersley, b King

7

b Burton '..

5

 

Davies, b King

12

not out

9

 

Hahn I, b Waterfall..

12

run out

3

 

Wing T, c Burton, b Waterfall

6

b Waterfall' ..

8

 

Glauert, b Burton ,,

 

Burton

0

 

Huxley I, b Burton

0

b Waterfall...

l

 

Hahn II, run out

1

run out

1

 

Wood II, b Waterfall    ..

„ 5

c Walker, b Burton.,

0

 

Brown II, b Waterfall    „

3

b Waterfall ..

3

 

Wing II, c Lee, b Burton ..

0

c and b King..

1

 

Inman, not out

2

run out

3

 

Extras   , ,

7

Extras ..

19

 

Total

59

Total ..

53

 

We regret that the scores in the other House Matches were not properly kept. The final result reads as follows :-Hallam, 6 points ; Park, 4 ; Sharrow, 2 ; Town, 2.

THE start was most unpromising, of the first ten matches only two were won ; but the XI. improved greatly as the season wore on, and the final result-8 wins, 8 losses, and 1 drawn game-must be considered satisfactory. Classifying the matches in the usual way it will be seen that of the School matches four were won, Chesterfield (both matches), Doncaster, and Rotherham ; and three lost, Leeds, Doncaster, and Rotherham ; the usual match with Wesley College unfortunately had to be abandoned. Of the other matches four were victories, Bankers " A," Medicals, Masters, and Old Boys, and five were defeats, Firth College, U.C.C., Technical School, Clergy, and Mr. Blakeney's XI.; the match with the Sheffield Cantabs had to be aban­doned owing to the rain.

The Second XI. played four matches, all of which they won-two were against Rotherham G. S. Second XI., and the other two against Montgomery College.

The " House Matches" produced a very exciting finish, and necessitated an extra match between Hallam and Park to decide the championship. Hallam won by a few runs after a keen game, in which both sides could only obtain low scores in both innings.

At the close of the season Lean I and Hallam I were presented with their First XI. colours.

J. H. Y.

 

BATTING AVERAGES.

   
 

Total No.

Times

Highest

   
 

Innings.

not out,

score.

Aggregate.

Average.

Darbyshire (Captain)

12

0

24

96

8

Bramley (Vice-Captain)

19

3

42t

236

14.7

Lean 1

15

1

25

91

6.5

Hallam 1. ..

14

1

35

81

6.2

Steel

10

1

15*

53

5.8

Haslam

11

0

15

57

5.1

Burton

15

1

13t

69

4.8

Binney

17

0

13

52

3

Wood H, ..

8

3

10

36

7.2

Hahn 1

8

2

10

22

3.6

Thomas I ..

10

2

8

23

2.8

* Not out.        t Twice.

the following have also played : Thomas II (4), Turner I (3.6), Twigg (11), Cornu (5.5), Coombe I, Lockwood, Hammond, Douthwaite I, Walker I, and Forsdike III.

BOWLING AVERAGES.

 

Overs.

Maidens.

Runs.

Wickets.

Average.

Darbyshire

145

47

261

49

5.3

Hallam I

73

13

162

17

9.5

Binney II

76

11

179

22

8.1

Lean I

138

32

281

43

6.5

Bramley

25

2

92

7

13.1

Haslam

14

2

33

1

33

Thomas I

5

1

19

2

9•15

Turner I

10

6

7

1

7

Burton

2

1

2

2

1

CHARACTERS OF FIRST XI.

DARBYSHIRE, S. C. (Captain) fully retained his reputation as a bowler of more than average merit. His batting showed considerable improvement, and he frequently made very useful scores. He has proved himself a very efficient captain.

BRAMLEY A. (Vice-Captain) as a scoring bat has made a wonderful improvement since last season. His average of 14.7 contained scores of 42 (twice), 32 (not out), 21, and several double figure innings in addi­tion. A brilliant field, and a fair change bowler.

LEAN proved himself a very reliable and useful bowler, especially when we lost Darbyshire in the latter part of the season. He keeps a good length always. Also shows promising form as a batsman.

HALLAM.-A pretty bat, who has played one or two fine innings during the season. Is a left-hand bowler, and has done some good service with the ball. Lazy in the field.

STEEL I. has batted very well throughout the season. He has several good scoring strokes, and with more height would be a really dangerous bat. Has fielded well at cover point.

HASLAM.-A hard hitter, a fast bowler, and a keen field, but somewhat unreliable.

BURTON.-A useful bat, and a very fair wicket-keeper.

BINNEY II was rather disappointing. He did well in the House Matches, but failed to retain his reputation afterwards. Bowls a very deadly ball now and again.

WOOD II has good style, and plenty of pluck. Fields well.

HAHN I.-An improved batsman and fielder.

THOMAS I is lacking in steadiness.

Among others who played for the XI. and showed promising form, we may mention THOMAS II, TURNER I, CORNU, and TWIGG.

We have had handed to us for perusal a copy of The South African Leaguer and Loyal Colonist, which somewhat extended appellation belongs to an organ whose principles would not, we fancy, commend themselves to the " Little Englander." The whole paper is character­ised by a literary vigour and an out-spokenness on public men and things, which convinces us that the editor might find large scope for a good and useful work in the mother country. The paragraph, however, which particularly interests us is that devoted to " Leaguer " portraits, the subject of which is Dr. Darley-Hartley, the first President of the South African League. Dr. Hartley is an Old Boy of the Grammar School, where he was educated previously to his training at Guy's Hospital, where he gained honours in two successive years and carried off the second exhibition in his last year. He was sometime editor of Guy's Hospital Gazette. He went to the Cape in 1878 in the Imperial Medical Service ; was invalided home after the Zulu War, but returned in the following year. His career in South Africa has been an eventful one. In addition to discharging the duties of his profession, he has pro­minently identified himself with political questions, and has done much to educate his fellow colonists by the powerful organ of the Press. He has edited The South African Freeman, The South African Medical Journal, The Farmers' Chronicle, and The East London Standard. In brief, his position in the political arena marks him as a man who is writing his name in the history of his adopted country.

We have received a copy of Young England, which is yet another of a class of periodicals intended to be used, with special cover, as any­body's school magazine, and seems to be a cheap publication of its size.

The Science Society has published the first number of its magazine, which is undoubtedly a tribute to the industry of some of the members ; though it certainly must be admitted that it is not without blemishes, and those not of a nature necessarily incidental to a first issue.

We congratulate Middleton on the excellent position he has taken in the Oxford Senior Locals. He was second on the list, and was distinguished in Latin, Greek, Mathematics, English, and French ; being first in Latin, fourth in Greek, and tenth in Mathematics. He was also, on the result of the examination, excused Responsions and the Additional Subject.

We also congratulate Dunstan on having passed the Advanced Stage in the following subjects in the S. K. Examinations:-Chemistry, Electricity, Sound, Light, Heat.

Williams III has passed the preliminary examination of the Pharmaceutical Society.

Leonard Strangeways (O.B.), in addition to his Foundation Scholarship, has been awarded a King Edward's Scholarship at King Edward's School, Birmingham, and has won the Lee Divinity Prize, the Malwood French Prize, and was bracketed equal with another for the Chance Divinity Prize.

The following have been elected on the Games Committee to fill the places vacated by Darbyshire, Blandy, and Wing 1:-Binney II, Twigg, Steel I.

At the first Committee meeting of the term, Bramley was elected Captain of the Football, and Haslam Vice Captain.

The Prize Distribution has been fixed for Tuesday, November 24th, when the fortunate ones will receive their rewards at the hands of the Rev. J. R. Eyre, Vicar of Sheffield.

A capital shelter for cycles has been erected during the holidays by the Sergeant, who has laid his plans with a view to meeting any possible increase in the number of machines.

The further results of the S. K. Examinations are as follows :­

Inorganic Chemistry (Elementary Stage)-Pass: J. E. Lister, W. G. Walker, A. W. Lines. Alternative Course-Pass : J. H. Preston Fair (Elementary) : G. P. Brightwell : (Alternative) : W. A. G. Burton.

Practical Inorganic Chemistry (Advanced Stage)-2nd Class : O. Glauert. Elementary Stage-Pass : W. A. G. Burton, J. E. Lister, W. G. Walker, C. A. Hahn. Fair ; L. J. Lean, A. S. Hahn.

We beg to acknowledge the receipt of the following contemporaries :-Central, Clayesmorian, Leys Fortnightly, Our Magazine, Pelican, Peterite, Sheaf, Sydneian, Thistle, Wyvern.